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OFFICIAL CATALOG 2015-2016 8888 Balboa Avenue San Diego, CA 92123-1506 (858) 499-0202 Fax (858) 499-0233 www.coleman.edu

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Coleman University Catalog

A nonprofit coeducational institution originally chartered in 1963 Accredited by the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools to award, Associate’s degrees, Bachelor’s degrees, and Master’s degrees 750 First Street N.E., Suite 980 Washington, DC 20002-4241 (202) 336-6780 Verso

L3 This Catalog, Volume N-1 replaces and supersedes Catalog Volume M-4.1 Catalog effective for students entering August 3, 2015-July 31, 2016

Information Subject to Change without Notice To abide by accreditation standards and regulatory requirements and to ensure that curriculum and operations remain abreast of current trends in education and the information technology field, Coleman University reserves the right to change policies, procedures, and curriculum when it feels that the changes are in the best interest of the students and the University. 2

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Table of Contents PART 1: GENERAL INFORMATION............................................................................................8

Coleman University ....................................................................................................................................................................... 8 Affiliations ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 9 History of the University ............................................................................................................................................................. 9 Philosophy ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 11 Academic Freedom ..................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Statement on Diversity ............................................................................................................................................................. 12 Statement of Non-discrimination (Policy) ....................................................................................................................... 13 Governance and Management ............................................................................................................................................... 13 Academic Life ................................................................................................................................................................................ 13 Campus Life & Facilities ........................................................................................................................................................... 14 Contact Information ................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Hours of Operation ..................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Term Dates for 2015-2016 Academic Year ..................................................................................................................... 16 2015-2016 Academic Calendar ............................................................................................................................................. 17

PART 2: COLLEGES & PROGRAMS .......................................................................................... 18 College of Computer Information Science (CIS) ............................................................................................................ 18 College of Computer Networks (CCN)................................................................................................................................ 24 College of Graphic Design (CGD) .......................................................................................................................................... 27 College of General Education (CGE) .................................................................................................................................... 29 College of Graduate Studies (CGS) ....................................................................................................................................... 31

PART 3: ADMISSIONS ............................................................................................................ 35 Undergraduate Admissions Information .......................................................................................................................... 35 Graduate Admissions Information ...................................................................................................................................... 42

PART 4: STUDENT RESOURCES AND SERVICES ....................................................................... 49 Accessibility Services................................................................................................................................................................. 49 Career Services ............................................................................................................................................................................. 49 Test Center ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 50 Honor & Professional Societies ............................................................................................................................................. 50 Coleman Alumni Professional Society (CAPS)................................................................................................................ 51 Curriculum Development & Instructional Support ...................................................................................................... 51 Online Learning ............................................................................................................................................................................ 52 Financial Aid .................................................................................................................................................................................. 52 Information Technology........................................................................................................................................................... 52 Library and Resource Center ................................................................................................................................................. 52 Orientation ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 53 Student Services........................................................................................................................................................................... 53 Student Housing........................................................................................................................................................................... 53 Veteran Student Support ......................................................................................................................................................... 53

PART 5: VETERAN AFFAIRS .................................................................................................... 54 Military Student Applicants .................................................................................................................................................... 54 Veteran Education Benefit Programs Available ............................................................................................................ 55 Student Responsibilities........................................................................................................................................................... 61

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Deployments ................................................................................................................................................................................. 63 Called to Serve - Re-Admission Policy ............................................................................................................................... 64 Debts and Over-Payments ....................................................................................................................................................... 65 Student Overpayments ............................................................................................................................................................. 65 VA Healthcare ............................................................................................................................................................................... 66 Veterans Crisis Line.................................................................................................................................................................... 66

PART 6: EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID................................................................................. 67 Expenses.......................................................................................................................................................................................... 67 Financial Aid .................................................................................................................................................................................. 74

PART 7: ADMINISTRATIVE POLICIES ...................................................................................... 83 Consumer Information ............................................................................................................................................................. 83 Disclosure of Release of Information ................................................................................................................................. 83 Statement on Diversity ............................................................................................................................................................. 83 Statement of Non-Discrimination (Policy)....................................................................................................................... 84 Sexual Harassment ..................................................................................................................................................................... 84 Student Grievance Procedure ................................................................................................................................................ 84 Non-Academic Student Code of Conduct & Ethics ........................................................................................................ 85 Cancellation and Withdrawal Policies ............................................................................................................................... 88 Suspension, Dismissal and Reinstatement....................................................................................................................... 89 Identification Badges ................................................................................................................................................................. 90 Visitors On Campus .................................................................................................................................................................... 90

PART 8: ACADEMIC POLICIES................................................................................................. 91 Academic Code of Conduct & Ethics ................................................................................................................................... 91 University Catalog ....................................................................................................................................................................... 93 Registration ................................................................................................................................................................................... 94 Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy................................................................................................................. 95 Academic Calendar ..................................................................................................................................................................... 97 Attendance ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 98 Classroom Expectations/Conduct ....................................................................................................................................... 99 Academic Status ........................................................................................................................................................................... 99 Class Levels ................................................................................................................................................................................. 100 Academic Advising................................................................................................................................................................... 100 Residency Requirements ...................................................................................................................................................... 100 Registration and Registration Limits .............................................................................................................................. 100 Auditing Courses ...................................................................................................................................................................... 101 Repeated Courses ..................................................................................................................................................................... 101 Grades............................................................................................................................................................................................ 101 Transcripts .................................................................................................................................................................................. 104 Change of Degree Program .................................................................................................................................................. 106 Changes in Degree Requirements ..................................................................................................................................... 106 Grade Levels for Undergraduates ..................................................................................................................................... 106 Program Length ........................................................................................................................................................................ 106 Graduation ................................................................................................................................................................................... 107 Leave of Absence ...................................................................................................................................................................... 107 Withdrawal ................................................................................................................................................................................. 108 Transfer Credits/Credit for Previous Coursework ................................................................................................... 109

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Exceptions to Academic Regulations ............................................................................................................................... 112

PART 9: COURSE DESCRIPTIONS .......................................................................................... 113 Course Numbering System ................................................................................................................................................... 113

PART 10: FACULTY .............................................................................................................. 138 PART 11: STAFF ................................................................................................................... 144 INDEX ................................................................................................................................. 147

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Mission Statement To deliver relevant education that prepares individuals for technology-focused careers, while providing an environment where they may develop to their full potential.

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PART 1: General Information For over 50 years, Coleman University has served as San Diego’s only exclusive computer training institution. Founded in 1963, Coleman University is recognized as a thriving force in the field of information technology. Renowned for its innovative and engaging, inverted curriculum, the University has successfully taught thousands of students the skills they need to excel within their chosen fields. The University's motto "Dreams into Reality" is a testament to Coleman University’s dedication to ensuring that students are equipped with the knowledge and skills necessary to build the future of their dreams. Specializing in programs that promote the development of technology-focused careers, Coleman strives to provide students a high quality educational experience, while offering a supportive, friendly, and encouraging learning environment. Coleman University's knowledgeable and supportive administrative staff and faculty further enhance students’ learning and make attending Coleman University a wonderful and fulfilling experience. Committed to enhancing the life of its students, Coleman University aspires to maintain academic excellence and professional greatness.

Coleman University •

• •

Is accredited to offer degrees through the master’s degree by the Accrediting Council of Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS), 750 First Street N.E., Suite 980, Washington, DC 20002-4241. Phone: (202) 336-6780. Has been recognized as a Candidate for Accreditation by WASC Senior College and University Commission, 985 Atlantic Avenue, #100, Alameda, CA 94501, 510‐748‐9001. This status is a preliminary pre-accreditation affiliation with the Commission awarded within the five year period allowed to achieve Initial Accreditation. Candidacy is an indication that the institution is progressing toward Initial Accreditation. Candidacy is not Accreditation and does not ensure eventual Accreditation. Is a private institution approved to operate by the Bureau of Private Postsecondary Education. Approval to operate means the institution is compliant with the minimum standards contained in the California Private Postsecondary Education Act of 2009 (as amended) and Division 7.5 of Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations. o Any questions a student may have regarding this catalog that have not been satisfactorily answered by the institution may be directed to the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education at P.O. Box 980818, West Sacramento, CA 95798-0818, www.bppe.ca.gov, phone toll free (888) 370-7589, fax (916) 263-1897. o As a prospective student, you are encouraged to review this catalog prior to signing an enrollment agreement. You are also encouraged to review the School Performance Fact Sheet, which must be provided to you prior to signing an enrollment agreement. o A student or any member of the public may file a complaint about this institution with the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education by calling toll-free at (888) 3707589 or by completing a complaint form, which can be obtained on the bureau's Internet Website www.bppe.ca.gov. Is approved for veteran training. Is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien students.

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Affiliations • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers American Council on Education Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP) Career College Idea Exchange Group California Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Career College Association College Council Inc. National Hispanic College Fairs Council of College and Military Educators EDUCAUSE International Council on Systems Engineering ISACA Information Systems Audit and Control System National Association for College Admission Counseling National Association of Foreign Student Advisors National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators National Defense Industrial Association National Diversity Council Veteran Operations Pacific Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers Professional International Educators Roundtable San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Service Members Opportunity Colleges SHRM (Society for Human Resources Management) Western Association of Veterans Education Specialists Women in Defense WITI (Women in Technology International)

History of the University

In 1963, Coleman College was founded on the unprecedented career opportunities that electronic data processing was creating in industry, business, government, and education. In the 1970s, Coleman University responded to an ever-increasing need for individuals educated in information technology by offering associate of science and Bachelor of Science degree programs. These degree programs provided more substantial general and technical knowledge, and benefited graduates in their general education, as well as their ability to advance in technology careers and contribute to their communities. Subsequently, a general education department was also established to offer courses emphasizing English and communication, mathematics, social sciences, humanities, and management. Intermediate and advanced technology courses were also offered. In addition, Coleman University implemented its unique “inverted curriculum,” which allows students to concentrate on major course work before pursuing general education. In 1979, the proliferation of computers created the need for individuals trained to repair and maintain them. Coleman University responded by creating the Department of Computer Technology that developed a program that led to a certificate in Computer Electronics Technology and served as the core of the associate’s and bachelor’s degree programs. 9

In the 1980s, Coleman University maintained its leadership role specializing in both information science and computer technology. In 1982, with the guidance and support of industry leaders, a Master of Science degree in Information Systems was developed to provide graduates with the technical knowledge, conceptual understanding, and research skills necessary to function effectively as leaders in their technical professions. In 1994, anticipating the need for technicians and administrators of network systems, Coleman University developed an interdisciplinary program in computer applications and networks in the Office Automation Systems Department. In 1996, the Computer Applications and Networks Department began providing extensive training in local area networks and client-server applications, among the fastest growing sectors of the high-tech job market. As computer hardware became more sophisticated, troubleshooting evolved to require a deeper understanding of the total system, including software. The Computer Electronics Technology program was redesigned to reflect this shift in emphasis between hardware and software, and the department was renamed Computer Engineering Technology. Subsequently, the program evolved with industry trends emphasizing network technology and was renamed Computer Network Technology. This program eventually merged with the Computer Applications and Network program and became known as the Computer Networks program. On November 14, 2008, during the Coleman College 45th anniversary celebration, the transition to Coleman University was announced. In 2009, Coleman University introduced its Master of Business Administration program. Currently, the MBA program addresses the needs of students with a technology background who wish to transition into general business and management. In 2011, Coleman University introduced a Master of Business Administration in Health Care Management. The MBA HCM offers students essential tools and insights into the management of today’s health care business. Since 2011, Coleman University has continued to evaluate and develop its current programs in order to offer students up-to-date and relevant information. In 2014, many of Coleman University’s degree programs experienced substantive changes to improve curriculum based on industry input of workforce needs. The university continues to make every effort to infuse current best-practices, standards, and knowledge into its programs so that students learn the necessary skills and information for their technology-focused career aspirations. Today, Coleman University serves students and alumni from every part of the United States, and many foreign countries. In addition to traditional post high-school undergraduates, Coleman University students include active and retired military personnel, professionals seeking new career directions, and international students who are acquiring new knowledge and skills to take back to their home countries. These students attend Coleman University because of its reputation for high academic standards, professionalism and personal concern for each student. Long recognized by numerous industry and educational organizations as a leader in computer education, Coleman University has pioneered many new teaching techniques with great effectiveness. Technological developments are continuously researched so that the curricula and technical equipment for student use may be updated accordingly. 10

Philosophy

The Board of Trustees adopted the following Vision, Mission, and Outcomes Flow in January 2015:

Vision Statement

Coleman University is a leading non-profit teaching institution whose graduates will enjoy successful technology-focused careers and serve as leaders in their community and chosen professions.

Mission Statement

To deliver relevant education that prepares individuals for technology-focused careers, while providing an environment where they may develop to their full potential

Institutional Outcomes

Coleman University students will acquire and be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes upon graduation: • •

• • • •

• • •

Express ideas clearly, concisely, and persuasively orally and in writing. Assess and solve technology-oriented issues using quantitative techniques and critical thinking skills. Locate pertinent technical information and evaluate its quality. Demonstrate technical proficiency in a chosen field of endeavor. Lead and participate in team-oriented projects. Demonstrate knowledge of the responsibilities and ethics of citizenship and one's role in society.

Degree Level Outcomes

Associate degree programs are designed to develop the hands-on skills and competencies required for employment. Bachelor degree programs are designed to focus on industry subject matter expertise, while continuing the development of communications, problem solving skills, and independent thinking. Graduate degree programs are designed to integrate industry subject matter expertise, which the knowledge and skills required to manage business in a technological economy.

Program Level Outcomes

Program level outcomes are defined through the Curriculum Development process and reviewed by the Board’s Academic Affairs Committee. 11

Course Level Outcomes

Course level outcomes are defined through the Curriculum Development process and reviewed by the Board’s Academic Affairs Committee.

Overall Objectives

The mission is supported by the following overall objectives. • • • • • • • •

Improve the quality of life for every student accepted and every person employed at Coleman University. Develop Coleman University as an outstanding teaching institution whose accelerated, career-focused programs satisfy industry needs and respond to changing market demands. Prepare students for both entry-level employment and leadership roles in information technology and business. Promote a collaborative environment where team-based decisions foster change as a means for continuous improvement. Maintain innovative leadership in curriculum design and continuously improve pedagogy and instructional practices that support outstanding teaching and learning. Attract and retain high-quality faculty and staff who perform their duties in a superior manner and are sensitive to the needs of students and graduates. Operate a financially stable institution whose resources are sufficient to achieve all strategic objectives and withstand adverse economic conditions. Connect Coleman University to its graduates, the San Diego community, and technology and business industries through institutional outreach and development programs.

Academic Freedom

Coleman University upholds academic freedom for its faculty and students. The freedom to teach and learn, supported by free inquiry and free expression is essential to the acquisition of knowledge and the quest for the truth.

Statement on Diversity

Coleman University is committed to providing all students with essential tools for achieving their full potential, regardless of race/ethnicity, sex/gender, socioeconomic class, age, religious beliefs, political views, sexual orientation, or differing abilities. The goal of the University is to foster community and to develop students who exhibit social responsibility, equity, and productive citizenship in an increasingly global society. Each member of the Coleman University community has a responsibility to honor this commitment to supporting a diverse and inclusive campus. Coleman University does not tolerate acts of discrimination, harassment, or intimidation, which compromise the integrity of the University. The University will take necessary action to prevent, correct, and where indicated, discipline unlawful, intimidating, or other 12

inappropriate behavior. Students should report concerns to Student Services; employees should report concerns to Human Resources.

Statement of Non-discrimination (Policy)

Coleman University does not discriminate based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or age in its programs and/or activities. The following official has been designated to handle inquiries regarding Coleman University’s policies of nondiscrimination: Coleman University President 8888 Balboa Avenue San Diego, CA 92123-1506 Ph. (858) 499-0202

Governance and Management Legal Control

Coleman University is a nonprofit educational institution chartered under the nonprofit corporation laws of the State of California. The Articles of Incorporation vest the legal control and governance of Coleman University in the Board of Trustees. The Board establishes the mission and general policies of the University, oversees its finances and appoints its corporate officers.

Board of Trustees

Mike Maier, Acting Chairman Nancy Houston Norbert J. Kubilus, Interim President & CEO Dean Johnston Donald C. Jones Paul Panesar Corporate Officers Norbert Kubilus Dr. Kimberly Lobera, Vice President/Academics Ron Klingensmith, Chief Financial Officer Bobbie Strohm, Vice President/Marketing & Admissions Bruce Gilden, Vice President/Institutional Effectiveness & ALO, Secretary

Academic Life

In a time of rapidly developing technology and a fluctuating global economy, it is natural for individuals contemplating a career change to question the purpose and value of a college education. Often this evaluation is made solely in terms of subsequent economic benefits. At Coleman University, we believe that not all of life’s rewards are strictly economic, and we have a broader view of what we offer our students. A university should be more than a credentials factory. Our purpose is not only to prepare students for meaningful professional careers, but to offer them the opportunity to develop their full potential. At Coleman University, students are not simply future wage earners. They are individuals, and our academic programs are specially designed to encourage their creative and analytical thinking while preparing them for what is ahead. Our limited enrollment and small class sizes foster the opportunity to develop strong interpersonal relationships among students and encourages such between students, faculty and staff, facilitating learning and professional development. Faculty members are 13

available to meet with students, making it possible for enterprising students to extend themselves to their intellectual limits with ample support and feedback. Additionally, Coleman University has worked hard to provide meaningful curriculum programs that motivate and engage students throughout their academic career. Our inverted curriculum, or “major first” approach to education, allows students to take technical courses for their major early in the program sequence, as part of their specialized degree and it provides them with a foundation of knowledge and skills that will move them ahead. Because it is impossible to immediately master all the skills necessary to be successful in this technological age, Coleman University believes it is important to help students acquire both technical skills and a broad education. Therefore, our programs also provide an awareness of the fundamental assumptions in the broader areas of human knowledge and prepare students for a lifetime of learning. Individuals ideally suited to Coleman University know where they are going and are willing to make an extra effort to achieve their goals. They prefer to feel they are a part of a warm, caring environment that provides individual learning and support in an setting that allows for practical application.

Campus Life & Facilities

Students at Coleman University have unique opportunities to get involved and participate in a variety of activities that are designed to encourage social and professional development. From video game tournaments and baseball outings to job fairs and veteran appreciation events, our students are able to engage in a variety of activities that truly make them a part of the Coleman University environment and foster a campus life experience that they will remember. Coleman University encourages active involvement through its sponsorship of co-curricular programs and its flexibility in planning events that students want to be a part of. All residential courses are taught at 8888 Balboa Avenue, San Diego, CA 92123-1506 , and coursework in the distance education mode of delivery is completed at a location determined by the student. The residential campus provides a comfortable, safe, well-appointed environment for students, faculty and staff, which includes adequate classroom space; well-appointed interior spaces; a variety of special- and general-purpose classrooms and computer labs; quiet study areas; well-lit exterior, including all parking lots; electronic security devices, including surveillance video and key access; professionally landscaped grounds; and a full-time professional facilities staff.

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Contact Information

Coleman University 8888 Balboa Avenue San Diego, CA 92123-1506 Ph: 858-499-0202 Fax: 858-499-0233 www.coleman.edu

Social Media:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ColemanUniv Twitter: https://twitter.com/colemanuniv YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/ColemanUniversity Google +: https://plus.google.com/+ColemanEdu/posts

Webclass:

webclass.coleman.edu

Department Email:

Admissions Career Services Online Learning Financial Aid Marketing Registrar Student Services Test Center

[emailprotected] [emailprotected] [emailprotected] [emailprotected] [emailprotected] [emailprotected] [emailprotected] [emailprotected]

Hours of Operation

Administrative Offices Mon – Thurs 8:00 am to 5:00 pm Fri 8:00 am to 3:00 pm Business Office Mon – Thurs 8:00 am to 7:00 pm Fri 8:00 am to 3:00pm Center for Academic Success Mon – Thurs 9:00 am to 6:00 pm Fri – By Appointment Financial Aid Mon – Thurs 8:00 am to 7:00 pm Fri 8:00 am to 3:00 pm Registrar Mon – Thurs 8:00 am to 7:00 pm Fri – 11:00 am to 3:00 pm Student Services Mon – Thurs 8:00 am to 10:00 pm Fri 8:00 am to 3:00 pm

Admissions Mon – Thurs 8:30 am to 7:00 pm Fri 8:00am to 3:00 pm Career Services Mon – Thurs 8:00 am to 7:00 pm Fri 8:00 am to 3:00 pm Computer Services Mon – Thurs 8:00 am to 7:00 pm Fri 8:00 am to 3:00 pm Library Mon – Thurs 11:00 am to 10:00 pm Virtual Library is accessible 24/7 Resource Center Mon – Thurs 7:45 am to 9:00 pm Fri 7:45 am to 3:00 pm Test Center Mon – Thurs 8:00 am to 8:00 pm Fri 8:00 am to 3:00 pm Sat 8:00 am to 1:00 pm Classes 5-week terms: 6:00 pm to 10:00 pm & 2-hour online learning, weekly 10-week terms: 8:00 am to 12:00 pm, 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm, & 6:00 pm to 10:00 pm 15

Term Dates for 2015-2016 Academic Year Graduate Programs (5 Week Terms) Term Start August 3, 2015

Term End September 6, 2015

September 7, 2015

October 11, 2015

October 12, 2015

November 15, 2015

November 16, 2015

December 20, 2015

January 11, 2016

February 14, 2016

February 15, 2016

March 20, 2016

March 21, 2016

April 24, 2016

April 25, 2016

May 29, 2016

May 30, 2016

July 3, 2016

July 4, 2016

August 7, 2016

Undergraduate Programs (10 week Terms) Term Start August 3, 2015

Term End October 11, 2015

October 12, 2015

December 20, 2015

January 11, 2016

March 20, 2016

March 21, 2016

May 29, 2016

May 30, 2016

August 7, 2016

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2015-2016 Academic Calendar 7/31 Tuition Due (UG & GRD) 8/3 Term Start (UG & GRD)

9/4 Tuition Due (GRD) 9/6 Term End (GRD) 9/7 Term Start (GRD) 9/7 Labor Day-CLOSED

10/9 Tuition Due (UG & GRD) 10/11 Term End (UG & GRD) 10/12 Term Start (UG & GRD)

11/11 Veteran’s Day-CLOSED 11/13 Tuition Due (GRD) 11/15 Term End (GRD) 11/16 Term Start (GRD) 11/26-27 Thanksgiving Recess-CLOSED 12/20 Term End (UG & GRD) 12/25 Christmas Day-CLOSED Holiday Hours 12/21-23: 9am-6pm 12/24: 9am-1pm 12/28 -30: 9am-6pm 12/31: 9am-1pm 1/4-7: 9am-6pm 1/8: 9am-4pm

1/1 New Year’s Day-CLOSED 1/8 Tuition Due (UG & GRD) 1/11 Term Start (UG & GRD) 1/28 MLK Day-CLOSED

UG-Undergraduate

S 2 9 16 23 30

M 27 3 10 17 24 31

S

M

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

S

M

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

S 1 8 15 22 29

M 2 9 16 23 30

August 2015 T W R 28 29 30 4 5 6 11 12 13 18 19 20 25 26 27

F 31 7 14 21 28

S 1 8 15 22 29

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

F 2 9 16 23 30

S 3 10 17 24 31

November 2015 T W R F 3 4 5 6 10 11 12 13 17 18 19 20 24 25 26 27

September 2015 T W R 1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 29 30 October 2015 T W R 1 6 7 8 13 14 15 20 21 22 27 28 29

6 13 20 27

December 2015 T W R F 1 2 3 4 7 8 9 10 11 14 15 16 17 18 21 22 23 24 25 28 29 30 31

S

M

January 2016 T W R

3 10 17 24 31

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

S

M

GRD-Graduate

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

-Term End

F 1 8 15 22 29

S

February 2016 T W R 2 3 4 9 10 11 16 17 18 23 24 25

F 5 12 19 26

S 6 13 20 27

2/12 Tuition Due (GRD) 2/14 Term End (GRD) 2/15 Term Start (GRD)

F 4 11 18 25

S 5 12 19 26

3/2 FAFSA Priority Filing Date 3/18 Tuition Due (UG & GRD) 3/20 Term End (UG & GRD) 3/21 Term Start (UG & GRD)

F 1 8 15 22 29

S 2 9 16 23 30

4/15 Tuition Due 4/17 Term End (GRD) 4/18 Term Start (GRD)

5/27 Tuition Due 5/29 Term End (UG & GRD) 5/30 Memorial Day- CLOSED* 5/30 Term Start (UG & GRD) *

7 14 1 28

M 1 8 15 22 29

S

M

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

March 2016 T W R 1 2 3 8 9 10 15 16 17 22 23 24 29 30 31

S

M

April 2016 T W R

3 10 17 24

4 11 18 25

5 12 19 26

S 7 14 21 28

S 1 8 15 22 29

M 2 9 16 23 30

May 2016 T W R 3 4 5 10 11 12 17 18 19 24 25 26 31

F 6 13 20 27

S 7 14 21 28

S 5 12 19 26

S

M

5 12 19 26

6 13 20 27

June 2016 T W R 1 2 7 8 9 14 15 16 21 22 23 28 29 30

F 3 10 17 24

S 4 11 18 25

S

M

T

3 10 17 24 31 7

4 11 18 25 1

5 12 19 26 2

F 1 8 15 22 28 5

S 2 9 16 23 30 6

S 2 9 16 23 30

-Term Start

17

6 13 20 27

7 14 21 28

July 2016 W R 6 13 20 27 3

7 14 21 28 4

-Holiday, University Closed

7/1 Tuition Due (GRD) 7/3 Term End (GRD) 7/4 Independence Day-CLOSED* 7/4 Term Start (GRD) * 8/5 Tuition Due 8/7 Term End (UG & GRD)

__ -Tuition Due

PART 2: Colleges & Programs College of Computer Information Science (CIS) Software Development Major Associate of Science in Software Development

Students in the Software Development major learn the fundamentals of systems analysis and design, website development, mobile development, and e-commerce concepts required to begin a career in the Information Technology (IT) industry. Graduates of this program will have designed programming solutions in prominent programming languages on popular platforms and possess an understanding of contemporary computing principles with an emphasis in software development. In addition, the student will further develop important human relations, mathematics, oral and written communication skills, and other general education subjects.

Learning Outcomes:

The Associate of Science in Software Development has the following learning outcomes. Upon completion of this program the student will be able to: 1. Modify existing software to correct errors, or to improve its performance. 2. Implement application design using industry standard techniques. 3. Produce internal and external documentation for all deliverables. 4. Code software solutions of varying complexity in an object oriented language. 5. Manipulate data for the analysis of application capabilities and satisfaction of requirements 6. Collaborate in software application development projects.

Coursework:

The following courses make up the Associate of Science in Software Development. The courses are not necessarily offered in the sequence in which they are listed. Units 8 4 4 8 8 4 4 4 4 8 8 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

COM 107 Introduction to Programming COM 112 Programming Logic and Design COM 122 Web Interface Development COM 152 Object-Oriented Programming I COM 202 Object-Oriented Programming Concepts COM 222 Client-Side Web Programming COM 232 SQL and Database Design COM 239 Software Testing COM 242 Server-Side Web Programming COM 262 Mobile Development COM 290 Systems Design and Implementation ENG 110 College Composition GE ENG 200 Communications GE HUM/SOC* GE HUM/SOC* GE HUM 225 Ethics GE MAT 162 Algebra I GE SEC 200 Introduction to Security SEC 210 Ethics, Policies and Procedures 18

Units required for graduation (AS degree) Residency Requirement * Students are required to take 1 HUM (either 110 or 115) and 1 SOC (either 110 or 115) GE Courses are part of the general education degree requirement

96 64

Full-time students (12 units per module) can complete this degree program in 8 ten-week terms. The units earned may be applied towards a Bachelor of Science degree within limitations. (Please see Changes in Degree Requirements, Residency Requirements, and Credit Age Limitation.)

Bachelor of Science in Software Development

Graduates of this program have expertise in the most popular computer languages, systems analysis and design, as well as operations management of a computer installation. The general education component of the degree develops additional communication skills, and an awareness of the individual’s responsibility in society.

Learning Outcomes:

In addition to the learning outcomes listed for associate of science degree, upon completion of Bachelor of Science in Software Development program the student will be able to: 1. Modify existing software to correct errors, or to improve its performance. 2. Implement application design using industry standard techniques. 3. Produce internal and external documentation for all deliverables. 4. Code software solutions of varying complexity in an object oriented language. 5. Manipulate data for the analysis of application capabilities and satisfaction of requirements 6. Collaborate in software application development projects. 7. Apply ethical and legal standards to decisions commonly faced by software development professionals. 8. Communicate technical concepts to both technical (including supervisors, subordinates, and coworkers) and non-technical audiences. 9. Perform Quality Assurance activities on existing software products. 10. Create a fully documented computer system to meet specified requirements while considering real-world constraints, including information security. 11. Manipulate data for analysis of system capabilities and satisfaction of requirements.

Coursework:

The following courses make up the Bachelor of Science in Software Development. The courses are not necessarily offered in the sequence in which they are listed. Units 8 4 4 8 8 4 4 4

COM 107 Introduction to Programming COM 112 Programming Logic and Design COM 122 Web Interface Development COM 152 Object-Oriented Programming I COM 202 Object-Oriented Programming Concepts COM 222 Client-Side Web Programming COM 232 SQL and Database Design COM 239 Software Testing 19

COM 242 Server-Side Web Programming COM 262 Mobile Development COM 290 Systems Design and Implementation ENG 110 College Composition GE ENG 200 Communications GE HUM/SOC* GE HUM/SOC* GE HUM 225 Ethics GE MAT 162 Algebra I GE SEC 200 Introduction to Security SEC 210 Ethics, Policies and Procedures AREA I English and Communications +GE AREA II Social Science + GE AREA III Humanities + GE AREA IV Mathematics GE AREA V Science GE AREA VI Advanced Technology (in residence) AT AREA VII General Education Electives GE AREA VIII Electives Units required for graduation (BS degree)

4 8 8 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 8 8 8 4 4 32 12 8 180

Residency Requirement

92

+ Courses must be from upper division-300 or above GE Courses are part of the general education degree requirement AT Courses that satisfy the advanced technology requirement are identified in the Course Description section of this catalog. Full-time students (12 units per module) can complete this degree program in 15 ten-week terms.

Game Programming Development and Design Programs Associate of Science in Game Programming Development and Design (Teach-Out, No new enrollments)

This program is designed to prepare graduates for entry-level employment in the area of computer game programming, development, and design. The successful graduate will be able to effectively apply standard programming concepts, including sound and graphics, in a console/computer game setting; create and utilize a framework for designing console/computer games; build and animate three-dimensional models; and apply the preceding as part of a group to create comprehensive games. These objectives will provide graduates with a firm grasp of the skills, knowledge, and abilities that are demanded by businesses in the computer/console gaming industry. Students will combine back-end programming and networking solutions with realistic multimedia interaction to satisfy consumer demand for exceptional game-playing experiences. In addition, the student will further develop important human relations, mathematics, oral and written communication skills through general education studies. 20

Learning Outcomes:

The Associate of Science in Game Programming Development and Design has the following learning outcomes. Upon completion of this program the students will be able to: 1. Modify existing software to correct errors or improve performance. 2. Implement sound and graphics in video game projects. 3. Produce internal and external documentation for all deliverables. 4. Code video game solutions of varying complexity in an object oriented language. 5. Design an interactive video game. 6. Create 2D and 3D assets. 7. Collaborate in the production of prototype video game development projects.

Coursework:

The following courses make up the Associate of Science Degree in Game Programming, Development, and Design. The courses are not necessarily offered in the sequence in which they are listed. COM 103 Introduction to Game Programming DSN 123 Game Development COM 153 Game Programming Concepts C++ DSN 140 Digital Images I COM 203 Game Programming Logic C++ DSN 180 Animation I COM 253 Game Programming C# ENG 110 Introduction to Writing GE COM 273 XNA MAT 162 Algebra I GE DSN 253 3D Hard Surface Modeling DSN 130 Typography ENG 200 Communications GE COM 283 3D Game Programming with DirectX10 DSN 263 3D Shader Materials HUM/SOC * GE DSN 273 Introduction to Zbrush COM 233 Level Design I SOC/HUM * GE COM 293 Game Programming Capstone HUM 225 Ethics Units required for graduation (AS degree) Residency Requirement GE Courses are part of the general education degree requirement * Students are required to take 1 HUM (either 110 or 115) and 1 SOC (either 110 or 115)

Units 8 4 8 4 8 4 8 4 8 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 8 4 108 72

Full-time students (12 units per module) can complete this degree program in 9 ten-week terms. The units earned may be applied towards a Bachelor of Science degree within limitations. (Please see catalog sections “Changes in Degree Requirements,” “Residency Requirements,” and “Credit Age Limitation.”)

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Bachelor of Science in Game Programming Development and Design

In the Bachelor of Science Degree in Game Programming, Development and Design program, students develop the technical, professional, and personal skills needed for the industry. The curriculum is designed to provide an understanding of management and human relations, mathematics and physical sciences, as well as technical and design classes that translate into practical skills that can further the student’s career developing software for the professional gaming industry. Graduates will master the same tools and software used by the game industry, participate in every level of game development, from concept to publishing, and complete portfolios that demonstrate their talents with completed video game modules.

Learning Outcomes:

In addition to the learning outcomes listed for associate of science degree, upon completion of Bachelor of Science in Game Programming Development and Design the students will be able to: 1. Modify existing software to correct errors or improve performance. 2. Implement sound and graphics in video game projects. 3. Produce internal and external documentation for all deliverables. 4. Code video game solutions of varying complexity in an object oriented language. 5. Design an interactive video game. 6. Create 2D and 3D assets. 7. Collaborate in the production of prototype video game development projects. 8. Apply development and design standards in the creation of a portfolio. 9. Author 2D and 3D assets for implementation in an industry standard game engine. 10. Research industry standards to maintain professional relevancy. 11. Adhere to standards in writing clear and efficient code in conjunction with the relevant programming language(s) used in the gaming industry. 12. Collaborate in the production of a completed video game development project.

Coursework:

The following courses make up the Bachelor of Science in Game Programming Development and Design. The courses are not necessarily offered in the sequence in which they are listed. COM 103 Introduction to Game Programming DSN 123 Game Development COM 153 Game Programming Concepts C++ DSN 140 Digital Images I COM 203 Game Programming Logic C++ DSN 180 Animation I COM 253 Game Programming C# ENG 110 Introduction to Writing GE COM 273 XNA MAT 162 Algebra I GE DSN 253 3D Hard Surface Modeling DSN 130 Typography ENG 200 Communications GE COM 283 3D Game Programming with DirectX10 DSN 263 3D Shader Materials HUM/SOC * GE DSN 273 Introduction to Zbrush 22

Units 8 4 8 4 8 4 8 4 8 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

COM 233 Level Design I SOC/HUM * GE COM 293 Game Programming Capstone HUM 225 Ethics AREA I English and Communications + GE AREA II Social Science + GE AREA III Mathematics/ Science GE AREA IV Humanities+ AREA V Advanced Technology AT AREA VI Electives Units required for graduation (BS degree)

4 4 8 4 8 8 8 8 20 20 180

Residency Requirement

92

+ Courses must be from upper division-300 or above GE Courses are part of the general education degree requirement AT Courses that satisfy the advanced technology requirement are identified in the Course Description section of this catalog. The units earned may be applied towards a Bachelor of Science degree within limitations. (Please see Changes in Degree Requirements, Residency Requirements, and Credit Age Limitation.)

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College of Computer Networks (CCN) Network Security Programs Associate of Science in Network Security

The Network Security associate’s program is designed to provide students with the basic knowledge and technical skills to begin a career in the IT industry. The graduate will have an understanding of computer hardware, software, programming concepts, and networks, with a primary emphasis in network administration. Graduates of this program are able to perform the functions of a PC/Network Support Technician as well as install and configure the necessary hardware and software to support a local area network infrastructure. In addition, the student will further develop important human relations and communication skills for advancement in the areas of customer service and management. The units earned may be applied towards a Bachelor of Science degree within limitations. (Please see catalog sections “Changes in Degree Requirements,” “Residence Requirements,” and “Credit Age Limitation.”)

Learning Outcomes:

The Associate of Science in Computer Networks has the following learning outcomes. Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to: 1. Research solutions to computer network issues. 2. Work within teams. 3. Troubleshoot emergent network problems. 4. Build secure networks.

Coursework:

The following courses make up the Associate of Science in Network Security. The courses are not necessarily offered in the sequence in which they are listed. NET 110 A+ Repairing and Maintaining PCs NET 250 Networking Concepts COM 259 Linux Fundamentals NET 208 Windows Clients NET 209 Windows Servers SEC 200 Introduction to Network Security NET 260 Linux Network Administration NET 240 Advanced TCP/IP ENG 110 College Composition GE NET 225 Introduction to CISCO Networking MAT 162 Algebra I GE HUM 110 Introduction to Humanities GE HUM 225 Ethics GE SEC 210 Ethics, Policies & Procedures NET 210 Wireless Technologies NET 235 Virtualization ENG 200 Communications GE SOC 110 Introductory Sociology GE NET 232 Routing and Switching Essentials

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Units 8 4 8 4 8 4 4 8 4 8 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

Units required for graduation (AS degree) Residency Requirement GE Courses are part of the general education degree requirement

96 64

Full-time students (12 units per module) can complete this Associate in Science degree program in 8 ten-week modules.

Bachelor of Science in Network Security

The Network Security program is designed to prepare students for careers in computer and network security, and to deal with the challenges specific to this area. Areas of emphasis include fundamental security measures necessary in modern business, performance of the basic functions of a PC/Network Support Technician, and installation/configuration of hardware and software infrastructure to support a local area network. Graduates of this program have a basic understanding of computer hardware, software, programming concepts, and network administration with a primary emphasis on network security.

Learning Outcomes:

The Bachelor of Science in Computer Networks has the following learning outcomes. Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to: 1. Research solutions to computer network issues. 2. Work within teams. 3. Troubleshoot emergent network problems. 4. Build secure networks. 5. Provide optimal solutions to secure network design concerns. 6. Manage effective teams. 7. Implement unique solutions to current and emergent network threats. 8. Design secure networks.

Coursework:

The following courses make up the Bachelor of Science in Network Security. The courses are not necessarily offered in the sequence in which they are listed. Units 8 4 8 4 8 4 4 8 4 8 4 4 4 4 4 4

NET 110 A+ Repairing and Maintaining PCs NET 250 Networking Concepts COM 259 Linux Fundamentals NET 208 Windows Clients NET 209 Windows Servers SEC 200 Introduction to Network Security NET 260 Linux Network Administration NET 240 Advanced TCP/IP ENG 110 College Composition GE NET 225 Introduction to CISCO Networking MAT 162 Algebra I GE HUM 110 Introduction to Humanities GE HUM 225 Ethics GE SEC 210 Ethics, Policies & Procedures NET 210 Wireless Technologies NET 235 Virtualization 25

ENG 200 Communications GE SOC 110 Introductory Sociology GE NET 232 Routing and Switching Essentials AREA I English and Communications+ GE

4 4 4 8

AREA II Social Science+ GE AREA III Humanities+ GE

8 8

AREA IV Mathematics

4

GE

Area V Science AREA VI Advanced Technology (in residence) AT AREA VII General Education Electives GE AREA VIII Electives Units required for graduation (BS degree) Residency Requirement GE Courses are part of the general education degree + Courses must be from upper division-300 or above AT Courses that satisfy the advanced technology requirement are identified in the Course Description section of this catalog.

4 32 12 8 180 92

Full-time students (12 units per module) can complete this Bachelor of Science degree program in 15 ten-week modules (this includes the 8 modules of the associate portion of the program).

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College of Graphic Design (CGD) Graphic Design Major Associate of Science in Graphic Design

Students in the Graphic Design major learn the fundamentals of Graphic Design and applied visual communication. Graduates of this degree program will possess a foundational design skill set that individual students may leverage into career paths leading to roles as Advertising Promotions and Marketing Managers, Art Directors, Fine Artists, Desktop Publishers, Industrial Designers, Multi-Media Artists, or Animators. In addition, students will further develop important human relations, mathematics, oral and written communication skills, and other general education subjects.

Learning Outcomes:

The Associate of Science in Graphic Design has the following learning outcomes. Upon completion of this program, the student will be able to: 1. Produce graphics using standard industry software applications. 2. Effectively communicate both orally and visually. 3. Apply artistic styles, principles, and practices. 4. Create clear information hierarchies with coherent design layouts. 5. Validate design choices.

Coursework:

The following courses make up the Associate of Science in Graphic Design. The courses are not necessarily offered in the sequence in which they are listed. Units DSN 104 Drawing DSN 114 Design Principles COM 124 Computer Foundations DSN 134 Typography I DSN 144 Photography COM 154 Vector Graphics COM 164 Layout 1 COM 174 Digital Images 1 DSN 184 Marketing COM 262 Mobile Development COM 204 Digital Images 2 COM 214 Layout 2 DSN 224 Web 1 DSN 234 Multimedia COM 244 Content Management Systems DSN 254 Web 2 DSN 264 Print Production Essentials DSN 274 Professional Practices DSN 294 Portfolio ENG 110 College Composition GE ENG 200 Communications GE

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 27

HUM/SOC* GE HUM/SOC* GE MAT 162 Algebra I GE SEC 200 Introduction to Security SEC 210 Ethics, Policies and Procedures HUM 225 Ethics GE AS degree requirements Residency Requirement * Students are required to take 1 HUM (either 110 or 115) and 1 SOC (either 110 or 115) GE Courses are part of the general education degree requirement Full-time students (12 units per module) can complete this associate in science degree program in 8 ten-week modules.

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4 4 4 4 4 4 96 64

College of General Education (CGE)

The College of General Education provides the general education courses required by the associate and bachelor degree programs. All courses offered in English and Communications (ENG), Humanities (HUM), Management (MAN), Mathematics (MAT), Science (SCI), and Social Sciences (SOC), are classified as general education courses and are notated in the program coursework listings and course descriptions with the following symbol: GE.

General Education Requirements

General education requirements are identified in the sections that describe the various degrees in the coursework listings. Students must meet general education requirements to earn associate and/or bachelor degrees.

Associates Level General Education Learning Outcomes

General Education courses at the associate’s degree level align to the following learning outcomes. 1. Communication Proficiency a. Communicate effectively orally and in writing b. Facilitate intercultural communication c. Identify biases in information 2. Critical Thinking a. Identify the logic, validity, and relevance of information b. Recognize information from multiple perspectives in order to reach a reasoned conclusion 3. Information Literacy a. Define the specific information needed to solve a problem or answer a question b. Locate the appropriate and relevant information to match informational needs c. Examine information for currency, relevancy, and reliability 4. Quantitative Literacy a. Use algebraic methods to solve problems b. Interpret mathematical models (formulas, graphs, tables, schematics) and draw inferences from them c. Define or apply mathematical concepts to areas outside of mathematics through modeling real-world situations 5. Ethical Decision Making a. Make informed choices regarding conflicting situations in their lives and recognize the consequences of their choices b. Describe real world ethical problems or dilemmas and identify those affected by the dilemma c. Discuss the influence of culture on one’s own perceptions or ideologies

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Bachelors Level General Education Learning Outcomes

General Education courses at the bachelor’s degree level align to the following learning outcomes. 1. Communication Proficiency a. Formulate a theoretical understanding of communication b. Demonstrate an understanding of another culture in multiple formats c. Defend connections between a cultural artifact and the society from which it is produced 2. Critical Thinking a. Distinguish unbiased information b. Evaluate at text’s or speaker’s use of rhetoric 3. Information Literacy a. Define the specific information needed to solve a problem or answer a question b. Locate the appropriate and relevant information to match informational needs c. Examine information for currency, relevancy, and reliability 4. Quantitative Literacy a. Integrate statistical methods to solve problems d. Interpret mathematical models (formulas, graphs, tables, schematics) and draw inferences from them e. Define or apply mathematical concepts to areas outside of mathematics through modeling real-world situations 5. Ethical Decision Making a. Make informed choices regarding conflicting situations in their lives and recognize the consequences of their choices b. Describe real world ethical problems or dilemmas and identify those affected by the dilemma c. Discuss the influence of culture on one’s own perceptions or ideologies 6. Leadership a. Work collaboratively with others toward a common goal b. Demonstrate effective social interaction skills appropriate to the occasion, task, or audience

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College of Graduate Studies (CGS)

Information Technology (IT) was the fastest growing profession at the end of the 20th Century, and the 21st Century continues to provide even more opportunities. As the IT field has evolved, it has become highly specialized, requiring management with specialized skills. Working professionals in the IT field who aspire to leadership positions and greater responsibility should consider obtaining a Master of Science degree from Coleman University. A triad of objectives is used to measure academic progress in the graduate division. These objectives include technical knowledge in the chosen profession, conceptual understanding of the issues involved, and the practical application of concepts through a practitioner-scholar model of education. Graduate students are expected to assume responsibility and exercise initiative in their education. Students are expected to actively participate in the processes of learning, developing creativity, honing problem-solving skills, and improving their ability to communicate effectively. Much like so-called dual career ladders provided by today’s business environments, Coleman University offers three distinct graduate emphases. Students wishing to focus on enhancing their technical expertise may select the major in Information Technology. Those focused on the functional aspects of business management may select either the Master of Business Administration or the Master of Business Administration with a specialization in Health Care Management. Courses run continuously throughout the year. All programs are designed so students may join their chosen graduate program at any class start during the year.

Master of Science in Information Systems Management

The Information Systems Management major offers students the opportunity to explore advanced techniques, current trends, and future directions in information systems management. It is expected that graduates will be able to assume responsible positions in industry, business, government, or education at the management, development, and planning levels.

Learning Outcomes:

The Master of Science in Information Systems Management program has the following learning outcomes. Upon completing this program the student will be able to: 1. Develop detailed business plans including budgets. 2. Strategically analyze business information technology needs. 3. Propose an information technology security plan for a global business. 4. Construct a human resources strategic plan. 5. Diagnose a firm’s e-commerce capability.

Coursework:

The following courses make up the Master of Science in Information Systems Management degree. The courses are not necessarily offered in the sequence in which they are listed. MBA 615 Project Management COM 620 Advanced Systems Design and Analysis COM 640 Distributive Communications and New Technology MBA 655 Human Resource Management COM 656 Management of Information Security COM 660 Database Systems 31

Units 5 5 5 5 5 5

COM 665 Leadership COM 671 Business Intelligence and Decision Support Systems MBA 680 Financial Management and Analysis COM 685 Management of Network Technology Readiness COM 690 Management of Emerging Technologies RES 698 Thesis I RES 699 Thesis II Units Required for Graduation Residency Requirement

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 65 50

Graduate students can complete this Master of Science in Information Systems Management degree program in 13 five-week modules.

Master of Business Administration

Offered in in both on-campus and distance education formats The Master of Business Administration offers tools and insights into the management of business today. Students will explore quantitative and qualitative tools of management and will examine the dynamic environments managers must face, both inside and outside the organization. An emphasis on leadership and team building provides the human skills students will need as managers. It is expected that graduates will be able to assume responsible positions in industry, business, government, or education at the management, development, and planning levels.

Learning Outcomes:

The Master of Business Administration program has the following learning outcomes. Upon completing this program the student will be able to: 1. Solve organizational problems. 2. Create strategic plans. 3. Communicate to a global audience. 4. Make decisions that adhere to legal and ethical standards. 5. Solve business problems using quantitative analyses. 6. Critically assess information.

Coursework:

The following courses make up the Master of Business Administration degree. The courses are not necessarily offered in the sequence in which they are listed. MBA 615 Project Management MBA 620 International Business Management MBA 625 Marketing MBA 630 Quantitative Management MBA 635 Management Support Through Information Systems MBA 640 Strategic Planning MBA 650 Organizational Design for Effectiveness MBA 655 Human Resource Management COM 665 Leadership COM 671 Business Intelligence and Decision Support Systems MBA 680 Financial Management and Analysis 32

Units 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

RES 698 Thesis I RES 699 Thesis II Units Required for Graduation Residency Requirement

5 5 65 50

Graduate students can complete this Master of Business Administration degree program in 13 five-week modules.

Master of Business Administration with a specialization in Health Care Management (Teach-Out, No new enrollments)

The Master of Business Administration degree with a specialization in Health Care Management offers students essential tools and insights into the management of the health care business today. Students acquire the fundamental skills needed to assume positions of leadership in this dynamic industry, including modern quantitative management techniques, health care human resources, planning and marketing, quality management and financial management. These skills are integrated with an understanding of the nature of U.S. health care institutions and pertinent legislation, and of important modern health information systems. An emphasis on leadership and team building offers the human skills students will need as managers. It is expected that graduates will be able to assume a range of responsible management positions in industry, business, government, or education in the health care and related industries.

Learning Outcomes:

Programmatic learning outcomes for this program have not been updated for alignment due to the program’s status as a teach-out. The Master of Business Administration with a specialization in Health Care Management program has the following learning outcomes. Upon completing this program the student will be able to: 1. Formulate various approaches to strategic management and marketing of health care services through the use of information systems. 2. Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills that are utilized when communicating with human capital. 3. Integrate the process of continuous quality improvement by assessing risk, safety and the quality of care patients receive. 4. Employ pragmatic application of analytical, mathematical modeling, and quantitative reasoning skills to make rational business decisions in health care organizations. 5. Evaluate policy issues, statues, and standards of health care guidelines through the proper, legal, and compliant use of electronic records and information maintained in data warehouses within health organizations.

Coursework:

The following courses make up the Master of Business Administration with a specialization in Health Care Management. The courses are not necessarily offered in the sequence in which they are listed. MBA 625 Marketing MBA 630 Quantitative Management MBA 635 Management Support Through Information Systems MBA 640 Strategic Planning MBA 655 Human Resource Management 33

Units 5 5 5 5 5

COM 665 Leadership COM 671 Business Intelligence and Decision Support Systems MHC 675 Survey to the U.S. Health Care System MHC 685 Financial Management for Health Care Organizations MHC 690 Quality Management in Health Care MHC 695 Health Information Systems RES 698 Thesis I RES 699 Thesis II Units Required for Graduation Residency Requirement Graduate students can complete this Master of Business Administration with a specialization in Health Care Management degree program in 13 five-week modules.

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5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 65 50

PART 3: Admissions Undergraduate Admissions Information

Coleman University offers degree programs for technology-focused careers at the associate’s and bachelor’s levels. Courses are offered in residence at the San Diego campus. Applications may be completed by contacting the campus. All applicants are expected to satisfy procedures and criteria for admission to Coleman University and to submit acceptable certified documents, which verify that they have satisfactorily completed all admission requirements. Students who meet all requirements will be considered for acceptance to the University.

Deadlines for Applications

The Admissions Department processes applications for admission on a year-round basis. All applicants must complete the Application for Admission and submit it to: Coleman University Admissions Department 8888 Balboa Avenue San Diego, CA 92123-1506 Telephone: 858-499-0202 Fax: 858-499-0233 Email: [emailprotected]

Fees

There is a $25 application fee for all programs, which is non-refundable. There is a $500 international services processing fee for international applicants, which is nonrefundable. There is a variable Student Tuition Recovery Fund Fee based on total institutional charges, which is non-refundable.

High School Diploma or Equivalent

All applicants must provide proof of graduation (diploma) or equivalent (GED certificate) for admission to Coleman University.

Transcripts

All applicants who have previously attended other colleges or universities and wish to be considered to receive transfer credit must send official transcripts to Coleman University. Student grade reports cannot be accepted in lieu of a transcript for awarding transfer credit. Mailed or hand delivered, sealed records addressed to Coleman University should bear the official seal or certification and appropriate signature from the issuing institution. Transcripts issued by schools outside of the United States must be translated into English by a certified educational credential service and evaluated for U.S. High school graduation equivalency. All foreign credentials must be evaluated by a NACES or AICE member organization regardless of whether they are printed in English. Transcripts (record of studies) issued in languages other than English must be accompanied by a certified English translation together with a copy of the record(s) from which the translation was made. Certified educational credential services such as www.ece.org or www.wes.org or 35

www.ierf.org (these agencies charge a fee and are not affiliated with Coleman University in any way) may be used to obtain certified translations. Documents submitted to the University in support of student’s application become the property of the University. The documents cannot be returned or forwarded. Transcripts should be sent to:

Coleman University Office of the Registrar 8888 Balboa Avenue San Diego, CA 92123-1506

Interview

Each individual who seeks admission to Coleman University will be interviewed by an Admissions Officer. The interview helps determine whether the applicant meets the admission requirements and has the qualities necessary to be successful in the information technology field. Among these qualities are the interest and motivation needed to be successful in this field.

Financial Guarantee Request for International Applicants

International applicants to Coleman University’s programs are required to provide evidence of financial support for their studies. International applicants must submit an Affidavit of Support. This financial guarantee document must be signed by the sponsor, if applicable, and certified by a bank official. A bank statement is also required from all parties who are sponsoring the student. This should be submitted with the application packet. Affidavit of Support: An individual sponsor, who is not a U.S. citizen, U.S. Permanent Resident, or non-immigrant legally present in the U.S., must sign a Notarized Bank Letter/Affidavit of Support and attach supporting financial documents or; an individual sponsor, who is a U.S. citizen, U.S. Permanent Resident, or non-immigrant legally present in the U.S., must submit a completed I-134 Affidavit of Support Form with supporting financial documents.

Official/Original Bank Letter: Provide a letter or certificate from the applicant’s bank showing the minimum amount required by International Admissions. The bank letter must be in English. A photocopy is unacceptable. (Please note that U.S. Financial Aid is not available for International Students). U.S. immigration law prohibits waiver of the financial guarantee. The financial guarantee certifies that sufficient funds are available for a student (and dependents) for study at the University for at least one academic year; and, barring unforeseen circ*mstances, adequate funding will be available from the same or equally dependable sources for subsequent years for the full course of study. Without this certified information, the I-20 form or DS-2016 (formerly known as IAP-66 form) cannot be issued. The financial guarantee must be current within twelve months of the student’s start date at the University. Applicants must also submit copies of their valid passports.

English Language Proficiency

Coleman University does not offer English as a Second Language instruction. All instruction occurs in English. All applicants, regardless of citizenship, whose native language is not English, must demonstrate competence in English. Applicant meets English proficiency requirements for enrollment in degree programs if the applicant provides evidence of English proficiency by one of the following: 36

• • • •

English is the official language of applicant’s home country Applicant has graduated from U.S. university with a degree from an accredited institution of higher education Applicant is transferring with Freshman Composition grade of B or higher from an accredited U.S. college or university Applicant has earned a minimum TOEFL score: 500 paper or 80 Internet-based

Academic performance at Coleman University may reveal the necessity for further English language study by a student. The University reserves the right to make the final determination of a student’s English proficiency level in all classes. Students who need additional proficiency in English before studying at Coleman University may request a referral to an ESL (English as a Second Language) program in the San Diego area.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

There is no minimum Grade Point Average (GPA) requirement for undergraduate admission to Coleman University.

Examinations

Wonderlic Scholastic Level Exam: Coleman University uses the Wonderlic Scholastic Level Exam to ensure that applicants are sufficiently prepared and capable of achieving success in the programs offered. An applicant must earn a score of 19 or above. Students may retake the Wonderlic Exam up to 4 times. The first retake can occur immediately with not waiting period. The second retake requires a 7 day waiting period, and the third retake requires a 30 day waiting period. Applicants will work with their admissions officer for scheduling.

Advanced Placement Tests (AP)

Any applicant who has taken the College Entrance Examination Board Advanced Placement Tests in a secondary school or high school and who has earned satisfactory score of a 5 may be credited coursework.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Satisfactory scores on the General and Subject Examinations of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) may entitle a student to receive units of academic credit. The Academic Advisor can provide detailed information on the tests available, fee schedules, and testing dates. Exams can be scheduled at the Coleman University Test Center. Scores should be sent to the Coleman University for evaluation.

DSST formerly DANTES

Satisfactory scores on the General and Subject Examinations of the DSST may entitle a student to receive units of academic credit. The Test Center can provide detailed information on the tests available, fee schedules, and testing dates. Exams can be scheduled at the Coleman University Test Center. Scores should be sent to the Coleman University for evaluation.

Applicants who are U.S. Veterans or Active Duty Personnel

Military applicants must satisfy the same admission requirements as all other applicants. Additionally, for awarding of transfer credit, military transcripts are required of all current or former service members attending Coleman University.

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Applicants for Re-Admission

Students who are not in continuous enrollment or who have not obtained an approved leave of absence must apply for re-admission through the Admissions Department. Continuous enrollment is defined as being officially registered and pursuing an academic program. Students who have not enrolled consecutively must apply for re-admission unless they have obtained an approved leave of absence. Applicants applying for re-admission must submit a new application, pay all applicable fees (see Expenses and Financial Aid for program fee schedule), and if seeking transfer credit, submit any new transcripts from schools attended since last enrolled at Coleman University. Military students returning from active duty are guaranteed readmission subject to specific conditions (see Veteran Affairs for more information). Students who are re-admitted will be treated as new students, and their transcripts will be evaluated based on current curriculum and admissions requirements.

Returning Coleman University Graduates

Students who complete a degree at Coleman University and wish to apply for another degree program are not required to submit another application or pay another application fee, but they are required to pay the state-imposed Student Tuition Recovery Fund fee. The student must meet with an Admissions Officer to discuss terms of a new Enrollment Agreement and complete applicable procedure for entry into the new degree program.

Undergraduate Admissions Requirements

Coleman University has associates and bachelors level undergraduate academic programs and admits first-time freshman and transfer students.

Domestic Applicants 1. Application Form An application form is completed to gather important applicant information. This form is completed with an Admissions Officer. 2. Fees Undergraduate applicants are required to pay a $25.00 non-refundable/non-deferrable application fee at the time of enrollment. Undergraduate applicants are required to pay the non-refundable/non-deferrable Student Tuition Recovery Fund fee. 3. High School Diploma or Equivalency High school graduation is required for admission to Coleman University. Coleman University also recognizes the General Education Development (GED) certificate as an equivalent for high school graduation. 4. Official Transcripts Transcripts are only required for students who seek awarding of transfer credit. Transcripts for this purpose should be submitted during the application process. For more detailed information regarding transcripts, please see Transcripts. 5. Interview Applicants will be interviewed by an Admissions Officer to determine whether the applicant meets the admission requirements and has the qualities necessary to be successful in the information technology field. 38

6. Wonderlic Scholastic Level Exam Coleman University uses the Wonderlic Scholastic Level Exam to ensure that students are sufficiently prepared and capable of achieving in the programs offered at the University. As part of the admissions process, your Admissions Officer will have you take the Wonderlic Scholastic Level Exam during a visit to the University. 7. English Proficiency All applicants, regardless of citizenship, whose native language is not English, must demonstrate competence in English. Students who need additional proficiency in English before studying at Coleman University may request a referral to an ESL (English as a Second Language) program in the San Diego area, prior to admission. For detailed information, please see English Language Proficiency.

International Applicants 1. Application Form A completed application form, with all required signatures, must be returned to the University for processing. The application may be submitted in person, by postal mail, email, or fax. 2. Fees Undergraduate international applicants are required to pay a $25.00 nonrefundable/non-deferrable application fee and a $500.00 international services processing fee at the time of application submission. The application and international services processing fees are due before the University will issue an I-20. The institution accepts Visa, MasterCard or Discover. Students may, also, wire-transfer money directly to the institution. Wire Transfer Information: Wells Fargo Bank 9360 Clairemont Mesa Blvd. San Diego, CA 92123 Routing #: 121000248 Account #: 449-679-9578 Account Name: Coleman University General Account International SWIFT BIC WFBIUSS6S Applications submitted without application fee payment will not be processed until payment is received. The Student Tuition Recovery Fund fee is due upon enrollment. 3. Official Transcripts All required transcripts must be submitted during the application process to ensure proper evaluation, timely processing, and successful admission to the University. 4. Financial Guarantee International applicants to Coleman University’s programs are required to provide evidence of financial support for their studies. International applicants must submit an Affidavit of Support, signed by the sponsor, if applicable, and certified by a bank official. A bank statement is also required from all parties who are sponsoring the student. This should be submitted with the application packet. For more detailed information regarding this requirement, please see Financial Guarantee Request for International Applicants. 39

5. Photocopy of Valid Passport An International applicant must provide a photocopy of his/her valid passport. 6. English Language Proficiency All applicants, regardless of citizenship, whose native language is not English, must demonstrate competence in English. Applicants may present a score of 500 or higher paper-based, 80 internet-based on the official Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). For more information regarding this requirement, please see English Language Proficiency

Transfer Admission/Credit Information

Undergraduate students transferring to Coleman University may meet some degree requirements by presenting credit earned from accredited institutions of higher education. The University does not award credit for prior experiential learning. Official evaluation of undergraduate transfer credit is under the authority of the Registrar. Transfer evaluation will be based on higher education work completed in which grades of C or better were earned. Note: Once a student has matriculated at Coleman University, any further transfer credits must have prior approval of the Registrar.

Transfer Credit Time Limits

English and math courses taken more than ten years prior to the start of term for which the applicant is applying are not eligible for transfer. Technology courses taken more than ten years prior to the start of term for which the applicant is applying are not eligible for transfer.

Transfer Credit Maximums

Associate’s degree programs: A maximum of 36 units of credit earned may be accepted for transfer from accredited institutions of higher education. The remaining 72 units must be completed at Coleman University to comply with residency requirements. Bachelor’s degree programs: A maximum of 88 units of credit earned may be accepted for transfer from accredited institutions of higher education. The remaining 92 units must be completed at Coleman University to comply with residency requirements.

Basis for Institutional Transfer Credit

Transfer credits (if earned within the United States) may be accepted from accredited institutions of higher education recognized by the United States Department of Education.

Transfer Credit for International Applicants

International students from government recognized institutions must submit official, translated transcripts and results from a foreign educational credential evaluation service agency. The evaluations must contain degree equivalency, U.S. semester/quarter credit and grade equivalent for each course, and U.S. grade point average. A syllabus or course description, also translated into English, covering each course being considered for transfer credit should be submitted with the transcript to the Registrar. Transcripts and syllabi documentation are evaluated for the minimum C grade equivalency requirement (see below) and subject matter content to determine the number of transfer credits allowed.

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During the transfer credit evaluation process, academic work from other colleges and universities is compared to Coleman University courses within the appropriate degree program, and transfer credits are awarded on the basis of similar content.

Grades Required for Transfer Credit

Undergraduate transfer credit can be accepted from accredited institutions only if the grade received is a C or better. Applicants to Coleman University must submit official transcripts of credit from all previously attended institutions for transfer credit evaluation. Course descriptions may also be required for evaluation of transfer credit.

Transfer Credit for Military Courses

Military students must satisfy the same admission requirements as all other applicants. Additionally, for awarding of transfer credit, military transcripts are required of all current or former service members attending Coleman University.

Variant Courses

Vocational or technical courses, remedial high school courses, and other courses below collegiate level are not accepted at Coleman University as transfer credits, even if the courses were completed at an accredited institution of higher education.

Review Process

Applications and additional documents are reviewed by the Admissions Department for completeness. The Admissions Department reviews all applications and determines which candidates will be admitted. An admitted student is expected to maintain the standard of academic performance upon which admission was based during the time between acceptance and enrollment. Official transcripts of all work completed between acceptance and enrollment must be furnished to Coleman University prior to the end of the first term of enrollment.

Final Documents

All final required documents will be completed with an Admissions Officer before or at orientation. Students with missing documents will be admitted in a conditional status, and missing documents must be submitted within twenty (20) days of the start of term.

Admission Status

An applicant may be automatically refused, without further recourse, if any fraudulent, altered, or forged documents or information are submitted. Students who meet all requirements will be considered for admission to the University but are not guaranteed admission. The Admissions Department may rescind an offer of admission to an applicant if it is determined that application information is fraudulent, misleading or incorrect. There is no appeal process for admissions decisions. All Coleman University admissions decisions are FINAL.

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Graduate Admissions Information

Coleman University offers admission to those who have the highest potential for graduate study and who, with the benefit of graduate education, are most likely to contribute substantially to their professional fields. Candidates admitted to graduate programs are generally professionals already employed in the field of business. Coleman University offers degree programs at the master’s level. Courses are offered in residence at the San Diego campus or through distance education, depending on the program. Applications may be completed by contacting the campus. All applicants are expected to satisfy procedures and criteria for admission to Coleman University and to submit acceptable certified documents, which verify that they have satisfactorily completed all admission requirements. Students who meet all requirements will be considered for acceptance to the University.

Deadlines for Applications

The Admissions Department processes applications for admission on a year-round basis. All applicants must complete the Application for Admission and submit it to: Coleman University Admissions Department 8888 Balboa Avenue San Diego, CA 92123-1506 Telephone: 858-499-0202 Fax: 858-499-0233 Email: [emailprotected]

Fees

There is a $25 application fee for all programs, which is non-refundable. There is a $500 international services processing fee for international applicants, which is nonrefundable. There is a variable Student Tuition Recovery Fund Fee based on total institutional charges, which is non-refundable.

Transcripts

Applicants seeking acceptance into a graduate-level program must submit proof of completion of a bachelor’s level degree program from an accredited institution. Mailed or hand delivered, sealed records addressed to Coleman University should bear the official seal or certification and appropriate signature from the issuing institution. Official records including, transcripts, evaluations, diplomas, certificates and translations must be delivered in a sealed envelope from the administering institutions or service. Completed coursework must demonstrate the equivalent of a minimum B average (3.0). No photocopies will be accepted. Transcripts (record of studies) issued in languages other than English must be accompanied by a certified English translation together with a copy of the record(s) from which the translation was made. Certified educational credential services such as www.ece.org or www.wes.org or www.ierf.org may be used to obtain certified translations (these agencies charge a fee and are not affiliated with Coleman University). 42

Documents submitted to the University in support of student’s application become the property of the University. The documents cannot be returned or forwarded. Transcripts should be sent to:

Coleman University Office of the Registrar 8888 Balboa Avenue San Diego, CA 92123-1506

Financial Guarantee Request for International Applicants

International applicants to Coleman University’s programs are required to provide evidence of financial support for their studies. International applicants must submit an Affidavit of Support. This financial guarantee document must be signed by the sponsor, if applicable, and certified by a bank official. A bank statement is also required from all parties who are sponsoring the student. This statement should be submitted with the application packet. Affidavit of Support: An individual sponsor, who is not a U.S. citizen, U.S. Permanent Resident, or non-immigrant legally present in the U.S., must sign a Notarized Bank Letter/Affidavit of Support and attach supporting financial documents or; an individual sponsor, who is a U.S. citizen, U.S. Permanent Resident, or non-immigrant legally present in the U.S., must submit a completed I-134 Affidavit of Support Form with supporting financial documents. Official/Original Bank Letter: Provide a letter or certificate from the applicant’s bank showing the minimum amount required by International Admissions. The bank letter must be in English. A photocopy is unacceptable. (Please note that U.S. Financial Aid is not available for International Students). U.S. immigration law prohibits waiver of the financial guarantee. The financial guarantee certifies that sufficient funds are available for a student (and dependents) for study at the University for at least one academic year; and, barring unforeseen circ*mstances, adequate funding will be available from the same or equally dependable sources for subsequent years for the full course of study. Without this certified information, the I-20 form or DS-2016 (formerly known as IAP-66 form) cannot be issued. The financial guarantee must be current within nine months of the student’s start date at the University. Applicants must also submit copies of their valid passports.

English Language Proficiency

Coleman University does not offer English as a Second Language instruction. All instruction occurs in English. All applicants, regardless of citizenship, whose native language is not English, must demonstrate competence in English. English proficiency requirements for enrollment in degree courses are met if the student meets one of the following conditions: • English is the official language of student’s home country • Applicant graduated from U.S. university with an associate's or bachelor's degree • Applicant is transferring with a Freshman Composition grade of B or higher from an accredited U.S. college or university • Applicant has earned a minimum TOEFL score: 500 paper or 80 Internet-based

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Academic performance at Coleman University may reveal the necessity for further English language study by a student. The University reserves the right to make the final determination of a student’s English proficiency level in all classes. Students who need additional proficiency in English before studying at Coleman University may request a referral to an ESL (English as a Second Language) program in the San Diego area.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

The minimum Grade Point Average (GPA) requirement for graduate admission to Coleman University is a cumulative 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale for all applicants.

Examinations

Coleman University does not require students to take the GMAT or GRE for admission.

Applicants who are U.S. Veterans or Active Duty Personnel

Military applicants must satisfy the same admission requirements as all other applicants. Additionally, for awarding of transfer credit, military transcripts are required of all current or former service members attending Coleman University.

Applicants for Re-Admission

Students who are not in continuous enrollment or who have not obtained an approved leave of absence must apply for re-admission through the Admissions Department. Continuous enrollment is defined as being officially registered and pursuing an academic program. Students who have not enrolled consecutively must apply for re-admission unless they have obtained an approved leave of absence. Applicants applying for re-admission must submit a new application, pay all applicable fees (see Expenses and Financial Aid for program fee schedule), and any new transcripts from schools attended since last enrolled at Coleman University if seeking transfer credit. Military students returning from active duty are guaranteed readmission subject to specific conditions (see Veteran Affairs for more information). Students who are re-admitted will be treated as new students, and their transcripts will be evaluated based on current curriculum and admissions requirements.

Returning Coleman University Graduates

Students who complete a degree at Coleman and wish to apply for another degree program are required to submit another application but are not required to pay another application fee. The student must meet with an Admissions Officer to discuss terms of a new Enrollment Agreement and complete necessary procedure for entry into the new degree program.

Graduate Admissions Requirements

Coleman University has master’s level academic programs and admits students who have completed a bachelor’s degree.

Domestic Applicants 1. Application Form An application form is completed to gather important applicant information. This form is completed with an Admissions Officer. 44

2. Fees Graduate applicants are required to pay a $25.00 non-refundable/non-deferrable application fee at the time of enrollment. Graduate applicants are required to pay the non-refundable/non-deferrable Student Tuition Recovery Fund fee. 3. Bachelor’s Degree Proof of attendance and graduation from a bachelor’s degree program at an accredited institution recognized by United States Department of Education is required for admission into a Coleman University master’s level programs of study. The degree should be directly related to the applicant’s desired program of study. 4. Official Transcripts All required transcripts must be submitted during the application process to ensure proper evaluation, timely processing, and successful admission to the University. For more detailed information regarding transcripts, please see Transcripts. 5. Letters of Recommendation Three letters of recommendation from professional/educational sources are required. Each letter should be sent bearing the signature of the source and sealed in a separate envelope. 6. Statement of Intent All applicants must submit a statement of intent explaining his/her goals in the selected graduate program of study that will lead to a master’s degree. The statement must be typed, double-spaced, and formatted as an essay containing at least 250 words. 7. Current Resume A current professional resume, displaying the applicant’s educational background, work experience, and skills related to the desired program of study should be submitted. 8. English Language Proficiency All applicants, regardless of citizenship, whose native language is not English, must demonstrate competence in English. Students who need additional proficiency in English before studying at Coleman University may request a referral to an ESL (English as a Second Language) program in the San Diego area, prior to admission. For detailed information, please see English Language Proficiency. 9. Verifiable Field Experience (minimum 3 years) All applicants, regardless of degree program, must show verification that they have at least 3 years of relevant field experience for the desired program of study. Applicants need to obtain a letter of verification from their employer (supervisor or Human Resources).

International Applicants 1. Application Form A completed application form, with all required signatures, must be returned to the University for processing. The application may be submitted in person, by postal mail, email, or fax. 45

2. Fees Undergraduate international applicants are required to pay a $25.00 nonrefundable/non-deferrable application fee and a $500.00 international services processing fee at the time of application submission. The application and international services processing fees are due before the University will issue an I-20. The institution accepts Visa, MasterCard or Discover. Students may, also, wire-transfer money directly to the institution. Wire Transfer Information: Wells Fargo Bank

9360 Clairemont Mesa Blvd. San Diego, CA 92123 Routing #: 121000248 Account #: 449-679-9578 Account Name: Coleman University General Account International SWIFT BIC WFBIUSS6S

The Student Tuition Recovery Fund fee is due upon enrollment. 3. Bachelor’s Degree Proof of attendance and graduation from a bachelor’s degree program at an accredited institution recognized by United States Department of Education is required for admission into a Coleman University master’s level programs of study. The degree should be directly related to the applicant’s desired program of study. 4. Official Transcripts All required transcripts must be submitted during the application process to ensure proper evaluation, timely processing, and successful admission to the University. For more detailed information regarding transcripts, please see Transcripts. 5. Statement of Intent All applicants must submit a statement of intent explaining his/her goals in the selected graduate program of study that will lead to a master’s degree. The statement must be typed, double-spaced, and formatted as an essay containing at least 250 words. 6. Current Resume A current professional resume, displaying the applicant’s educational background, work experience, and skills related to the desired program of study should be submitted. 7. English Language Proficiency All applicants, regardless of citizenship, whose native language is not English, must demonstrate competence in English. For information regarding this requirement, please see the English Language Proficiency. 8. Verifiable Field Experience (minimum 3 years) All applicants, regardless of degree program, must show verification that they have at least 3 years of relevant field experience for the desired program of study. Applicants need to obtain a letter of verification from their employer (supervisor or Human Resources). 9. Financial Guarantee International applicants to Coleman University’s programs are required to provide evidence of financial support for their studies. International applicants must submit an 46

Affidavit of Support, signed by the sponsor, if applicable, and certified by a bank official. A bank statement is also required from all parties who are sponsoring the student. This should be submitted with the application packet. For more detailed information regarding this requirement, please see Financial Guarantee Request for International Applicants under Undergraduate Admission Information. 10. Photocopy of Valid Passport International applicants must provide a photocopy of his/her valid passport.

International Transfer Applicants

Applicants who are currently attending school in the United States also need to submit the following materials with their application packet: • Transfer Evaluation Form* o Only for applicants who currently hold an F-1 visa; applicant must be released form SEVIS by attending school before Coleman University can issue the I-20 • Photocopy of Current I-20 Form, other VISA type* o Only for applicants who are currently studying in the United States *Must be received prior to Coleman University issuing an Acceptance Letter or I-20.

Transfer Admission/Credit Information

Graduate coursework taken from an accredited institution can be considered for transfer credit. The number of transfer credits to be considered and the materials required to support petitions for transfer credit of previous graduate coursework will be specified for each program. A limited number of graduate transfer credits may be accepted from accredited institutions if the grade earned is B or higher. Graduate academic work acceptable for transfer credits must be appropriate to the degree program to be pursued at Coleman University and approved by the Dean or designee.

Transfer Credit Time Limits Transfer credit time limits are established for certain types of coursework. Please see Credit Age Limitation for more details.

Transfer Credit Maximums

Master’s degree programs: A maximum of 15 units of credit earned may be accepted for transfer from recognized undergraduate institutions. The remaining 50-55 units must be completed at Coleman University to comply with residency requirements.

Basis for Institutional Transfer Credit

Transfer credits (if earned within the United States) may be accepted from institutions of higher education that are accredited.

Transfer Credit for International Applicants

International students from government-recognized institutions must submit official, translated transcripts and results from a foreign educational credential evaluation service agency. The evaluations must contain degree equivalency, U.S. semester credit and grade equivalent for each course, and U.S. grade point average. A syllabus or course description, also translated into English, covering each course being considered for transfer credit should be submitted with the transcript to the Admissions Department. Transcripts and syllabi documentation are evaluated 47

for the minimum B grade equivalency requirement (see below) and subject matter content to determine the number of transfer credits allowed. During the transfer credit evaluation process, academic work from other colleges and universities is compared to Coleman University courses within the appropriate degree program, and transfer credits are awarded on the basis of similar syllabi.

Grades Required for Transfer Credit

Graduate transfer credit can be accepted from accredited institutions only in the grade receive is B or better. Completed coursework must demonstrate the equivalent of a minimum B average (3.0). Applicants to Coleman University must submit official transcripts of credit from all previously attended institutions for transfer credit evaluation. Photocopies will not be accepted. All grades earned at other accredited institutions will be used to compute the grade point average for admission purposes. The computed transfer credit grade point average from the other institution(s) does not appear on the Coleman University permanent record. Course descriptions may also be required for evaluation of transfer credit.

Transfer Credit for Military Courses

Please see Veteran Affairs for more information.

Review Process

Applications and additional documents are reviewed by the Admissions Department for completeness. The Admissions Department reviews all applications and determines which candidates will be admitted. An admitted student is expected to maintain the standard of academic performance upon which admission was based during the time between acceptance and enrollment. Official transcripts of all work completed between acceptance and enrollment must be furnished to Coleman University prior to the end of the first term of enrollment.

Final Documents

All final required documents will be completed with an Admissions Officer before or at orientation.

Admission Status

An applicant may be automatically refused without further recourse if any fraudulent, altered, or forged documents or information are submitted. Students who meet all requirements will be considered for admission to the University but are not guaranteed admission. The Admissions Department may rescind an offer of admission to applicants if it is determined that application information is fraudulent, misleading or incorrect. There is no appeal process for admissions decisions. All Coleman University admissions decisions are FINAL.

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PART 4: Student Resources and Services Coleman University provides a range of services and support necessary for student success. Students can meet with various offices to get the quality assistance and support. In addition, Coleman University also provides opportunities for students to get involved through a variety of co-curricular events and organizations implemented to supplement the academic programs and to enrich the educational and social experience.

Accessibility Services Academic Accommodation/Adjustment Policy

In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Coleman University offers accommodations to students with documented physical, psychological, and/or cognitive disabilities. Coleman University will adhere to all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and guidelines with respect to providing reasonable accommodations as required to offer equal educational opportunities to qualified disabled individuals. All students may request accommodation, regardless of type of disability, by completing the “Student Academic Accommodation/Adjustment” form. If the student’s situation changes or the student did not fill out this form, forms can be requested at the front desk at any time or be found online at the Coleman University website. Once the form has been submitted, stating that a student requests accommodation/adjustment, the ADA Coordinator and the ADA Review Board will determine if and how to accommodate the student’s needs. The ADA Review Board will then meet with the student to review all accommodations required. The Coleman University ADA policy states that academic accommodations are not provided until a student has provided adequate documentation of a disability. The ADA Review Board determines whether the documentation is adequate and what academic accommodations are appropriate. It is the policy of Coleman University to provide academic accommodations promptly upon receiving confirmation from the ADA Review Board that the student is eligible. The ADA Coordinator will provide the student with the ADA Accommodations memo to notify the student’s instructors of any necessary accommodations. If any problems or concerns regarding the provision of accommodations occur, the student must inform the ADA Coordinator before the next meeting time for that specific class. This allows the University to address concerns in a timely manner. If the student feels accommodation is not being made appropriately, the student may follow the published Student Grievance Procedures. Students seeking accommodations should contact Student Services to schedule an appointment with the ADA Coordinator.

Career Services

Coleman University’s Career Services Advisors work with students to help them develop their career paths along with their short- and long-range goals for job placement. They also work closely with employers to assist them in recruiting qualified, job-ready Coleman University graduates.

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The Career Services Department provides a variety of career development opportunities for students and graduates. These include but are not limited to on-campus job leads for possible interviews, assistance with resume writing, instruction in effective job-search techniques, and interview preparation. Individual career counseling sessions are also available to students and graduates. These sessions include a wide range of job searches that cover the career path and goals for each individual. Students or alumni interested in this service should contact Career Services at [emailprotected] to set up an appointment. Career Services Advisors participate in all levels of employer, student, and graduate placement needs to support a positive experience for all participants during the job search process. Records of communication are maintained to provide a custom understanding of employer and graduate needs. The Career Services Department provides students with a workbook that supports and extends all the subject matter covered during individual sessions. Further relevant material regarding the employment market and job opportunities is gathered from diverse sources and distributed through convenient campus posting locations and by email. For further information about Career Services, please visit http://www.coleman.edu/careerservices or email [emailprotected].

Test Center

The San Diego campus has an authorized Test Center offering PearsonVue, CLEP, and DSST (formerly DANTES) testing services by appointment or on a walk-in basis. The Test Center offers reduced pricing for Microsoft Client and CompTIA exams, including A+, NET+, and SEC+. The University also offers discounted test vouchers to Coleman University students and alumni. Please contact the Test Center for pricing and scheduling by email at [emailprotected] or call (858) 966-3970.

Honor & Professional Societies The Alpha Beta Kappa National Honor Society “The Mark of Distinction”

In 2010 Coleman University established a chapter of the Alpha Beta Kappa Honor Society. This organization exists to recognize outstanding student achievement in career and technical education. Alpha Beta Kappa is the premier national honor society for America’s private postsecondary schools, institutes, colleges, universities, and distance learning institutions – serving many institutions for the past 34 years. Alpha Beta Kappa places Chapters in institutions that have demonstrated high standards over a period of many years in the education and training of women and men in the numerous fields, trades, and occupations essential to modern society. There was no national society for private proprietary and nonprofit postsecondary institutions until the National Alpha Beta Kappa Honor Society was officially established. It is the mark of distinction for an institution to be awarded a Chapter of Alpha Beta Kappa. The fact that an individual is elected to membership in this honor society sets him/her apart as an exemplar of personal integrity and excellence.

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Business Professionals of America

Business Professionals of America is the leading CTSO (Career Technical Student Organization) for students pursuing careers in business management, office administration, information technology and other related career fields. The mission of Business Professionals of America is to contribute to the preparation of a worldclass workforce through the advancement of leadership, citizenship, academic, and technological skills.

National Technical Honor Society

Students are encouraged to apply for membership in this exclusive assembly. Membership benefits include NTHS accessories, eligibility for scholarships, and up to three letters of recommendation sent directly to employers and scholarship review committees.

Coleman Alumni Professional Society (CAPS)

The Coleman Alumni Professional Society (CAPS) is Coleman University’s alumni association. The mission of CAPS is to provide Coleman University alumni opportunities to enhance their professional careers by facilitating networking among alumni, professional development, industry and community engagement, access to resources, and by establishing a Coleman University community sense of pride within the alumni community. For further information about CAPS, please contact: Coleman Alumni Professional Society (CAPS) 8888 Balboa Avenue San Diego, CA 92123-1506 Email: [emailprotected] Web: www.coleman.edu/alumni Phone: (858) 499-0202 Fax: (858) 499-0233

Curriculum Development & Instructional Support

Continuous curriculum research and development is a basic tenet of the University’s commitment to excellence. Curriculum development is faculty driven and focused on three major areas: curriculum content, teaching equipment, and educational methodology. Membership in professional organizations and attendance at local and national seminars keeps faculty and administrators aware of educational developments. The curricula are continually and carefully scrutinized for appropriateness to the needs of the graduates. New subjects are surveyed for inclusion in the curriculum and new equipment of all kinds is evaluated to determine its suitability to meet the educational objectives of the students. The University is proud of its reputation as a pioneer in educational methodology. Computer-based instructional systems have long been an integral part of the University’s curriculum, and the University continues to search for additional ways to utilize these outstanding teaching systems. Based on continuing evaluation of industry and educational trends, new subjects, methods and equipment are researched, tested, and integrated into the curriculum. By regularly soliciting input from the information technology, education and business communities, the University is committed to researching the entire educational spectrum to develop and implement tomorrow’s education today.

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Online Learning

The University offers certain courses through online learning using the WebClass online learning platform. Online materials and educational activities are comparable to campus-based courses, with interaction between students and faculty occurring in virtual classrooms. For information regarding online technological requirements and responsibilities, please see Technology Requirements and Responsibilities, and for information regarding online attendance policy, please see Online Participation and Attendance Policy.

Financial Aid

Under the direction of the Director of Financial Aid, Financial Aid Administrators assess students’ resources to determine the best method of meeting their financial obligations. Financial Aid Officers are thoroughly knowledgeable of all funding sources available and are prepared to tailor plans to meet individual students’ needs. For more information regarding Financial Aid, please see Expenses and Financial Aid. Students may also contact Financial Aid at [emailprotected].

Information Technology

Coleman University provides extensive technical resources for its students, including eBooks. Each student is provided with an @student.coleman.edu email address as the official method for communicating deadlines and other important information. The University will use this as your primary email address while you are a student at Coleman University so you can receive information from your Instructors, Student Services, Financial Aid, and other departments. You will want to either check this email account regularly or have it forward email messages you receive to another account that you do check on a regular basis. Students who are on-campus also have access to the internet via computer labs or Coleman University WiFi.

Library and Resource Center

Library materials are available to Coleman University library patrons both on-campus and online. Professional librarian services are also available to the Coleman University community. The library’s overall collection covers the arts, humanities, social sciences, and general sciences with special emphasis on information sciences and business. Professional librarian services provide research services via email, chat, telephone and in-person. In addition, students can request materials from other libraries through interlibrary loan services. The library also subscribes to a number of full text databases to provide students and faculty with the content and support for research and scholarly activities. These and other online reference materials and resources are made available to students and faculty both on- and offcampus via the Coleman University computer network and the Internet. A Library Orientation Guide is issued to students, faculty, and staff as needed. Some classes include trips to the library or in-class visits for an orientation with the librarian. The Resource Center houses the required associate, bachelor (except for textbooks specifically related to the student’s major) and in-house master’s degree course instructional materials, such as textbooks, videos, syllabi, student and instructor guides, and/or class printouts. 52

With the exception of reference materials and periodicals, which must remain on campus, library print materials are checked out to students for a two-week period and may be renewed multiple times. When requested, low demand materials can be checked out for longer periods of time, up to a 10-week period. Faculty can check out any print materials for an unlimited length of time. Students check out textbooks based upon their class type; undergraduate students receive textbooks for a 10-week period while graduate students receive them for 5 weeks.

Orientation

Orientation is extremely important for all new students as they become members of the Coleman University community. Orientation familiarizes students with policies, procedures, programs and services. Orientation also offers new students the opportunity to interact with and to get to know faculty, administrators and new and returning students.

Student Services

While the University recognizes that most students pursue a college education for its future occupational value, Coleman University’s curricula are designed to encourage students to think of a college education as providing fullness of life and offering the opportunity to contribute to their fellow students and the community. Members of the Student Services staff are available to assist Coleman University students with academic and nonacademic questions (see Hours of Operation). Students may also contact Student Services at [emailprotected].

Student Housing

Coleman University does not provide housing facilities. The University does not assume responsibility for student housing, does not have dormitory facilities under its control, nor does it offer student housing assistance. Living accommodations can be found in reasonable proximity to the university. Single occupancy ranges from $1,000 to $2,800 depending on accommodations.

Veteran Student Support

Coleman University acknowledges and appreciates the sacrifice and commitment made by our current and veteran military personnel. In our efforts to provide a military friendly environment, the university has faculty and staff available to meet the needs of active duty and veteran students. Additionally, the university has a Veteran’s Center dedicated to our military student population for quiet study and periodic events. For more information specifically related to students who are or have been a part of the United States Armed Forces, please see Veteran Affairs.

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PART 5: Veteran Affairs Coleman University is committed to serving its military community. We appreciate and recognize the service and sacrifices of our nation’s active and veteran military personnel and their families. Our goal is to provide you with the best possible service during your transition to and success at Coleman University. Our faculty and staff are committed to supporting you as you engage and develop your skills and knowledge at Coleman University.

Military Student Applicants

Military students must satisfy the same admissions requirements as all other applicants. Additionally, military transcripts are required for all current or former service members seeking transfer credit for military experience/coursework.

Military Transcripts

Joint Services Transcript (JST)

JST is the Joint Services Transcript that replaces the Coast Guard Institute Transcript, the Army ACE Registry Transcript (AARTS) and the Sailor/Marine American Council on Education Registry Transcript (SMART). JST is an academically accepted document approved by the American Council on Education (ACE) to validate a service member’s military occupational experience and training along with the corresponding ACE college credit recommendations. The JST may be accessed and requested http://jst.doded.mil.

U.S. Air Force: Community College of the Air Force (CCAF)

The USAF, through the Community College of the Air Force (CCAF), provides a transcript detailing ACE recommended credit. You will be able to obtain this transcript for military training and experience even if you have not attended classes at CCAF. To order an official copy and have it mailed directly to us, please download a CCAF transcript (http://www.au.af.mil/au/ccaf/transcripts.asp) request and follow the instructions. CCAF transcripts typically arrive within 14 days. CCAF will send an official copy to Coleman University by mail.

Transfer Credit for Military Service and Training

Veterans, active-duty personnel, Guard and Reservists applying for admission to Coleman University may be granted academic credit on a case-by-case basis upon evaluation of official military transcripts. Coleman University may award academic credit to United States military personnel for courses and military occupational specialties (MOS), based on the American Council of Education (ACE) Guide for Military Transfer Credit. An MOS must have a recommendation evaluation by ACE (in the ACE Guide) for credit to be awarded. Course equivalencies and credit hours awarded for a particular Coleman University degree are determined by our colleges and/or academic departments. Credit hours may be awarded for specific courses toward degree requirements. The number of credit hours awarded will be determined by the college and/or academic department. Transfer Students Students who have attended other schools and used VA educational benefits will need to complete a VA Form 22-1995 (Change of Program or Place of Training) and submit it to the Director of Veterans Affairs. VA Form 22-1995 may be found at http://www.vba.va.gov/pubs/forms/VBA-22-1995-ARE.pdf. 54

Veteran Education Benefit Programs Available

Veterans and their dependents generally qualify for an array of Federal, State, Institutional and Private financing programs beyond the Military Education Benefit Programs listed and described below. For example, the U.S. Department of Education offers financial aid programs for almost everyone. Undergraduate students may qualify for the Federal Pell Grant, the Federal Supplemental Opportunity Grant, the Federal Work Study Program and the Federal Direct Student Loan Program. Graduate students may also qualify for the Federal Work Study and the Federal Direct Student Loan Program. The Federal Direct Loan Program generally offers student loans at interest rates considerably lower than interest rates on a typical consumer credit card. To apply for financial aid from the U.S. Department of Education, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/. The Federal School Code for Coleman University is 009273. We encourage you to apply annually. The application process is free and provides an opportunity for Coleman University to determine your eligibility for an array of financing opportunities. For more information related to Financial Aid, please see Financial Aid. The following Military Education Benefit Programs are available at Coleman University. • Montgomery GI Bill (Chapter 30) • Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment VetSuccess Program (Chapter 31) • Post-Vietnam Veterans Educational Assistance Program-VEAP (Chapter 32) • Post9/11 GI Bill (Chapter 33) • Vietnam Era GI Bill (Chapter 34) • Dependents’ Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 35) • The Yellow Ribbon Program • Transfer of Educational Benefits (TEB) • Military Tuition Assistance (TA) Program • Reserve Educational Assistance Program (Chapter 1607) • Montgomery GI Bill –Selected Reserve Program (Chapter 1606)

Montgomery GI Bill (Chapter 30)

Generally, the Montgomery GI Bill is for individuals who have been on Active Duty since July 1, 1985, who have contributed $1,200 to an educational fund and have completed a qualifying amount of “honorable” service. Additional information on the GI Bill may be found at Chapter 30 http://www.gibill.va.gov/pamphlets/Ch30/Ch30_Pamphlet_General.htm.

Post-Vietnam Veterans Educational Assistance Program-VEAP (Chapter 32)

If you are a veteran who entered active duty between January 1, 1977 and June 30, 1985 and who contributed to the program while on active duty, you are eligible for this benefit.

Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment VetSuccess Program (Chapter 31)

If you are a veteran who has a VA disability rating and an employment handicap, you may be entitled to vocational rehabilitation and employment (VR&E) services under Chapter 31 of the GI Bill. These services include—but are not limited to—counseling, training, education and job placement assistance. The following services may be provided through the VR&E program: • Comprehensive rehabilitation evaluation to determine abilities, skills, interests, and needs • Vocational counseling and rehabilitation planning 55

• • • • • •

Employment services such as job-seeking skills, resume development, and other work readiness assistance Assistance finding and keeping a job, including the use of special employer incentives On the Job Training (OJT), apprenticeships, and non-paid work experiences Financial assistance for post-secondary training at a college, vocational, technical or business school Supportive rehabilitation services including case management, counseling, and referral Independent living services for Veterans unable to work due to the severity of their disabilities

Eligibility

Eligibility and entitlement for VR&E are two different things. You may meet eligibility criteria, yet not be entitled to services. The first step in the VR&E process is to be evaluated to determine if you qualify for services. To receive an evaluation for VR&E services, you must meet the following “eligibility” criteria: • Have received, or will receive, a discharge that is other than dishonorable • Have a service-connected disability rating of at least 10% – or a memorandum rating of 20% or more from the VA • Submit a completed application for VR&E services (online at the Department of Veterans Affairs VONAPP - http://vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp/main.asp)

Period of Eligibility

Similar to many VA benefits, VR&E has a limited period of eligibility. The basic period of eligibility in which VR&E services may be used is 12 years from the date of separation from active military service, or the date the veteran was first notified by VA of a serviceconnected disability rating, whichever comes later. The basic period of eligibility may be extended if a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor determines that a veteran has a Serious Employment Handicap.

Program/Process Overview

If you are eligible for an evaluation under the Vocational Rehabilitation program, you must complete an application and meet with a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC). If the VRC determines that an employment handicap exists as a result of a service-connected disability, you will be entitled to services. The VRC will help you identify and select the appropriate services track, and together, you will develop a plan to address your rehabilitation and employment needs. You and your Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor will work together to: • Determine your transferable skills, aptitudes, and interests • Identify viable employment and/or independent living services options • Explore labor market and wage information • Identify physical demands and other job characteristics • Narrow vocational options to identify a suitable employment goal • Select a VR&E VetSuccess program track leading to an employment or independent living goal • Investigate training requirements • Identify resources needed to achieve rehabilitation • Develop an individualized rehabilitation plan to achieve the identified employment and/or independent living goals 56

The rehabilitation plan will specify an employment or independent living goal, identify intermediate goals, and outline services and resources needed to achieve these goals. You and the VRC will work together to implement the plan and achieve successful rehabilitation. If the VRC determines that you are not entitled to services, he or she will help you locate other resources to address any rehabilitation and employment needs identified during the evaluation. Referral to other resources may include state vocational rehabilitation programs; Department of Labor employment programs for disabled veterans; state, federal or local agencies providing services for employment or small business development; internet-based resources for rehabilitation and employment; and information about applying for financial aid. If you believe that you may be eligible for VR&E services, you can get started today by applying online at the Department of Veterans Affairs VONAPP (http://vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp/main.asp). Additional information may be found at Chapter 31 (http://www.vba.va.gov/bln/vre/).

Post 9/11 GI Bill Program (Chapter 33)

The Post-9/11 GI Bill provides financial support for education and housing to individuals with at least 90 days of aggregate service on or after September 11, 2001, or individuals discharged with a service-connected disability after 30 days. You must have received an honorable discharge to be eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Additional information may be found at http://www.gibill.va.gov/benefits/post_911_gibill/index.html. The Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) rate is based on the zip code of the campus with which you are affiliated. Additionally, students must be enrolled more than half-time for BAH eligibility. Half-time registration is as follows: • Undergraduate, 8 units • Graduate, NA Therefore, you must register for more than the units reflected above. The BAH calculator may be found at www.defensetravel.dod.mil/site/bahCalc.cfm (E-5 with dependents).

The Yellow Ribbon Program

The Yellow Ribbon Program is a provision of the Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008. It provides funding to veterans who have served at least 36 months of active duty following September 10, 2001, veterans who were honorably discharged from active duty for a service related disability and who served 30 continuous days following September 10, 2001, and dependents eligible for Transfer of Entitlement of the Post-9/11 GI. Coleman University is a participant in the Yellow Ribbon Program and eligibility is determined on a first-come, first-served basis. Applicants must have 100% eligibility for the Post 9/11 GI Bill to qualify for the Yellow Ribbon Program. Additionally, active duty service members and their spouses are not eligible for the Yellow Ribbon program. Questions regarding eligibility, program application, and guidance on completing the forms should be directed to the Veterans Affairs Coordinator. When tuition costs are fully covered by the Post-9/11 GI Bill and the Yellow Ribbon Program, no other institutional scholarships or grants that are specified to cover tuition costs (such as Coleman University’s academic scholarships or grants) will be awarded. The Yellow Ribbon funds that are provided by Coleman University are tied to tuition costs. If tuition costs are refunded or 57

reduced, the Yellow Ribbon award from Coleman University and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) will be reduced at the same percentage.

Transfer of Educational Benefits (TEB)

Some service members may be able to transfer all or some of their Post 9/11 GI Bill (Chapter 33) eligibility to their dependent children or spouse. Under the new law the Department of Defense is authorized to allow individuals who have served at least 6 years in the Armed Forces and who agree to serve at least another 4 years to transfer unused GI Bill entitlement to their spouse. In addition, when a service member reaches their 10-year anniversary they can choose to transfer the benefit to any dependents – spouse or children. The criteria for TEB are very specific and the transfer of benefits must be approved by the Department of Defense (DoD) while payment of benefits is handled by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Additional information may be found at http://www.gibill.va.gov/gi_bill_info/ch33/transfer.htm

Survivors and Dependents Assistance (DEA) – Chapter 35

Dependents’ Educational Assistance provides education and training opportunities to eligible dependents of certain veterans. The program offers up to 45 months of education benefits. These benefits may be used for degree and certificate programs, apprenticeship, and on-the-job training. Additional information may be found at http://gibill.va.gov/benefits/other_programs/dea.html

Military Tuition Assistance (TA) Program

Tuition Assistance (TA) is available to Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserve service members. Generally, TA has a limit of $250 per credit hour and an aggregate annual limit of $4,500. Additional information on the TA program for each branch of the military may be found on the links provided. Please note: if the links below prompt you with a security warning, simply accept the security certificate or follow the instructions to add an exception to your browser. • • • • •

For more information on the Air Force’s Tuition Assistance Program, visit https://www.my.af.mil/faf/FAF/fafHome.jsp For more information on the Army’s Tuition Assistance Program, visit https://www.goarmyed.com/public/public_tuition_assistance_policies.aspx For more information on the Coast Guard’s Tuition Assistance Program, visit http://www.uscg.mil/hq/capemay/Education/ta.asp For more information on the Marine’s Tuition Assistance Program, visit www.cbirf.marines.mil/Portals/16/Tuition%20Assistance%20Form.doc For more information on the Navy’s Tuition Assistance Program, visit https://www.navycollege.navy.mil/ta_info.aspx

Chapter 1606 (MGIB-SR)

The MGIB-SR program may be available to you if you are a member of the Selected Reserve. The Selected Reserve includes the Army Reserve, Navy Reserve, Air Force Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve and Coast Guard Reserve, and the Army National Guard and the Air National Guard. You may use this education assistance program for degree programs, certificate or correspondence courses, cooperative training, independent study programs, apprenticeship/onthe-job training, and vocational flight training programs. Remedial, refresher and deficiency training are available under certain circ*mstances. 58

Eligibility for this program is determined by the Selected Reserve components. VA makes the payments for this program. You may be entitled to receive up to 36 months of education benefits. Your eligibility for the program normally ends on the day you leave the Selected Reserve. One exception to this rule exists if you are mobilized (or recalled to active duty from your reserve status), in this case your eligibility may be extended for the amount of time you are mobilized PLUS four months. For example, if you are mobilized for 12 months your eligibility period is extended for 16 months (12 months active duty PLUS 4 months.) So even if you leave the reserves after mobilization, you may have additional eligibility to the MGIB-SR. If your unit is deactivated during the period beginning on October 1, 2007 through September 30, 2014 or you are involuntarily separated (for reasons other than misconduct) you will retain your original period of eligibility which is 14 years from the date of your first 6 year obligation with the selected reserves.

Eligibility

To qualify, you must meet the following requirements: • Have a six-year obligation to serve in the Selected Reserve signed after June 30, 1985. If you are an officer, you must have agreed to serve six years in addition to your original obligation. For some types of training, it is necessary to have a six-year commitment that begins after September 30, 1990; • Complete your initial active duty for training (IADT); • Meet the requirement to receive a high school diploma or equivalency certificate before completing IADT. You may not use 12 hours toward a college degree to meet this requirement; • Remain in good standing while serving in an active Selected Reserve unit. You will also retain MGIB - SR eligibility if you were discharged from Selected Reserve service due to a disability that was not caused by misconduct. Your eligibility period may be extended if you are ordered to active duty.

How to Apply

Your unit will give you a DD Form 2384-1, Notice of Basic Eligibility, when you become eligible for the program. Your unit will also code your eligibility into the Department of Defense personnel system so that VA may verify your eligibility. Obtain and complete VA Form 22-1990, Application for Education Benefits.

Chapter 1607 Reserve Educational Assistance (REAP)

REAP was established as a part of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005. It is a Department of Defense education benefit program designed to provide educational assistance to members of the Reserve components called or ordered to active duty in response to a war or national emergency (contingency operation) as declared by the President or Congress. This program makes certain reservists who were activated for at least 90 days after September 11, 2001 either eligible for education benefits or eligible for increased benefits.

Licensing and Certification Tests (Chapter 30, 32, 33, 35, 1606 and 1607)

VA can reimburse the cost of approved licensing and certification tests. Students are reimbursed the cost of the test, not to exceed the approved cost of the test or $2,000. Benefits can be paid for tests that are not passed, for tests retaken if not passed, and for tests required to be recertified or to renew a license. 59

Students must be eligible for benefits to receive test reimbursem*nt. They must have remaining entitlement and their delimiting date must not have passed. Information about test fee reimbursem*nt can be found at http://gibill.va.gov/resources/educationresources/programs/licensingandcertification.html. VA students can apply for test fee reimbursem*nt by completing and submitting an Application for Reimbursem*nt of Licensing or Certification Test Fees available at http://www.vba.va.gov/pubs/forms/VBA-22-0803-ARE.pdf. Attach a copy of the test results to the application. If test results are not available, attach a copy of the license or certification and a payment receipt. Test fee reimbursem*nt can be paid for each test for which reimbursem*nt is claimed and the required documents are submitted. Entitlement is prorated based on the amount reimbursed. If a student’s full-time benefit is $1000 per month and the student is reimbursed $500 for a test, then the student’s remaining entitlement will be reduced by ½ month. Some test examples include: • ACT (American College Testing Program) • AP (Advanced Placement Exam) • CLEP (College-Level Examination Program) • DSST (DANTES Subject Standardized Tests) • ECE (Excelsior College Examinations) • GMAT (Graduate Management Admission Test) • GRE (Graduate Record Exam) • LSAT (Law School Admission Test) • MAT (Miller Analogies Test) • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) For more information or to see if a test is approved, please visit http://inquiry.vba.va.gov/weamspub/buildSearchNE.do.

Applying For Reimbursem*nt

You must be eligible for GI Bill benefits to qualify for reimbursem*nt. Complete VA Form 220810 (Application for Reimbursem*nt of National Exam Fee). You may mail the required documentation to the Regional Processing Office in Muskogee, OK (P.O. Box 8888, Muskogee, OK, 74402-8888) or you can use the “Submit a Question” section of the GI Bill website to send the VA Form 22-0810 and attach required documents to your submission.

Tutorial Assistance (Chapters 30, 32, 33, 35, and 1606)

VA may pay tutorial assistance to a student receiving education benefits. The monthly rate may not exceed the cost of tutoring or $100. The maximum amount payable is $1200. There is no entitlement charge for the first $600 under Chapter 30 and 1606. There is no entitlement charge under Chapter 33 or 35. The student, tutor, and certifying official (CO) must complete an Application and Enrollment Certification for Individualized Tutorial Assistance VA Form 22-1990t. The application may be submitted at the end of each month or combination of months. The application must be signed and dated on or after the date of the last tutoring session certified. VA can pay for tutorial assistance during the one-year period before the date VA receives the application. All of the following criterion must be met for a student to be eligible for tutorial assistance: 60

• • •

The student must be in a post-secondary program ½-time or more. For Chapter 33, rate of pursuit must be “at least 50%.” The student must have a deficiency in a course that is part of his or her approved program. The student must be enrolled in the course during the term in which the tutoring is received for the course. Tutoring may not occur between terms.

When a certifying official signs an Application and Enrollment Certification for Individualized Tutorial Assistance, he or she certifies that: • Tutoring is essential to correct a deficiency. A letter from the course instructor should be put in the student’s VA file. The letter must state that the student is deficient in the course and that individual tutoring is required to correct the deficiency. • The tutor meets the college’s qualifications. Ideally, the school maintains a list of approved tutors. The list should indicate the subjects a tutor is qualified to tutor and the hourly charge. Students should be assigned a tutor from the approved list. A tutor may not be a close relative of the student. • The charges do not exceed the usual charges for tutoring.

VA Work Study (Chapters 33, 30, 31, 32, 35, 1606 and 1607)

Students can apply by completing VA Form 22-8691 “Application for Work-Study Allowance” and submitting the form to the VA Regional Processing Office in Muskogee, Oklahoma: P.O. Box 8888 Muskogee, OK 74402-8888 Students must attend school at ½ time course load rate or more.

What Type of Work Does a Work Study Student Do?

Students must be assigned to work sites that will permit them to perform VA related activities. These work sites include, but are not limited to: Regional Offices, VA Medical Centers, Vet Centers, VA Outpatient Clinics, National Cemeteries, and local education institutions. Pay is based on the higher of the Federal minimum wage or the State/Local minimum wage. Work performed on or after the effective date of any minimum wage increase will be paid at the higher rate even though the contract may show a lower rate.

Student Responsibilities E-Benefits Portal

The E-Benefits portal developed by the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense is an on-line resource for tools and benefits-related information. The portal serves Wounded Warriors, Veterans, Service Members, their families, and their caregivers. Students are encouraged to register and utilize eBenefits to assist with: • Obtaining up to date information on educational entitlement • Updating Direct Deposit and personal contact information • Downloading VA Letters and Personal Documents • Viewing the current status of payments (both education and disability) Students can access the web portal at http://www.ebenefits.va.gov.

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Student Responsibilities to Begin Receiving Benefits

The following steps must be completed prior to a student receiving VA educational benefits for Coleman University courses: • Students must be admitted to a degree program at Coleman University. • Students expecting to enroll under educational benefits administered by the Veterans Administration may apply online at http://vabenefits.vba.va.gov/vonapp/main.asp. • Students contact the VA Financial Aid Officer.

Responsibilities of Students Receiving Education Military Benefits

Students must notify their Certifying Official (CO) when any of the following occurs: • Dropping or adding course(s) • Withdrawing from course(s) • Discontinuing regular class attendance • Change in programs (academic majors) VA educational benefits are payable for regular attendance in courses that are part of the veterans’ program (major) curriculum. VA educational benefits are not payable for: • Classes not attended regularly • Repeating a course for which a passing grade was received • Classes for which credit is received through successful completion of a proficiency test or grade by examination • Classes taken on an audit basis • Classes that are dropped • Classes taken that are not part of the student’s academic program (major) curriculum

Your Role to Continue to Receive Benefits Reporting Requirements

Recertification for benefits is not automatic and must be requested each semester. To prevent overpayment and subsequent indebtedness to the Federal Government, it is important to notify the POC for your campus immediately of changes that may affect your eligibility for benefits. It is the responsibility of each student to keep their Certifying Official apprised of the following:

Class Registration

After registering, students should request VA-Once certification through their POC. The earlier a student registers and notifies registration information to the POC, the earlier certification can be transmitted to the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Changes to Schedule

Any additions, drops, withdrawals, or other interruptions must be immediately reported to the POC by the student.

Failure to Attend Class

Routine class attendance is required for students receiving VA benefits. Students who are unable to attend class for an extended period of time should notify their professors and their POC.

Change of Address

If a student’s address changes, the student must notify both the Department of Veterans Affairs and Coleman University.

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Your Role as a Student—Irrespective of your VA Benefit Program

The Veterans’ Administration requires all students attending Coleman University under Veterans Educational Assistance Benefits to make satisfactory academic progress and systematic advancement toward an educational objective or be liable for over payments from the Veterans’ Administration. Satisfactory progress and regular class attendance are expected. Note: Most military students at Coleman University meet the conditions for “satisfactorily pursuing” a program of study for receiving VA benefits by meeting the Coleman University general catalog requirements. However, a few VA requirements are more stringent than the Coleman University general catalog requirements and are as follows: 1. Regular Attendance: Students must be in regular attendance of all classes for which they are registered. Coleman University may periodically make attendance spot-checks through the faculty to verify compliance. 2. Unsatisfactory Progress: The University must notify the Veterans Administration that a student has made unsatisfactory progress if the student: a. Fails or withdraws from all classes or, b. Is suspended by the University. Education benefits are terminated when a student makes unsatisfactory progress. 3. Classes not completed: Unless there are extenuating circ*mstances, students do not receive benefits for any portion of a class dropped after the first 1-2 weeks of a term or for classes in which incomplete (delayed) grades are received and not resolved within one year.

Called to Serve

Coleman University is committed to providing the highest quality services for active military students and those affiliated with the military. It is our goal to provide a seamless transition for students from Coleman University who are deployed for national and international military service and who return to the University to complete their coursework. Coleman University employees realize every student’s situation is unique dependent upon course load, financial aid status, and date called to serve to name a few. As such, each and every student “called to serve” will be provided individualized service to address their specific needs.

Deployments

Coleman University will ensure students do not face an academic disadvantage as a result of being called to national or international service. When a student (or family member) receives orders to deploy, the University works with the student to determine the best options based on the circ*mstance. In these circ*mstances, students can withdraw from the University with a 100% refund and without penalty for the enrolled term or any future pre-paid terms. The University will also make every effort to restore students returning from national and military service to the status they held prior to their departure. If classes are in session at the time of activation, each case may be evaluated individually and instructors consulted as appropriate. The Financial Aid Office has guidelines for students called to serve with student loans. Given the differences in the programs of lenders, students should coordinate with their lenders directly to obtain deferments as prescribed by federal law.

Process

1. Withdrawal. At any point in the term, a student called to serve may withdraw from Coleman University by submitting a withdrawal request along with a copy of deployment orders to Student Services. The student will receive a full credit of paid tuition and fees for the term and any future terms already paid. Student Services will 63

process the withdrawal and arrange for appropriate adjustments to the student’s account. 2. Selective Drops. A student may drop one or more courses and elect to complete remaining coursework according to Option 3 or Option 4 below. A refund of tuition and fees for dropped courses will be honored. 3. Incompletes. Students who have successfully completed the majority of work for a course may be awarded a grade of “Incomplete” at the discretion of the professor. Professors are strongly encouraged to grant additional time for students to make up the required work. 4. Final Grades. A final grade option becomes available if the following requirements are met: a. The professor determines a sufficient amount of the course work has been completed, and b. Sufficient information about a student’s performance in the course has been obtained. Students must consult with their instructors to determine whether these two requirements have been met for a final grade to be awarded.

Called to Serve - Re-Admission Policy

Any student whose absence from Coleman University is necessitated by reason of service in the uniformed services shall be entitled to readmission to Coleman University if: 1. The student (or an appropriate officer of the Armed Forces or official of the Department of Defense) gives advance written or verbal notice of such service to Coleman University Official. 2. The cumulative length of the absence and of all previous absences from Coleman University by reason of service in the uniformed services does not exceed five years, and except as otherwise provided in this section, the student submits a re-application to reenroll at Coleman University.

Exceptions to verbal or written notice include:

1. No notice is required if giving of such notice is precluded by military necessity, such as: mission, operation, exercise, or requirement that is classified or, 2. A pending or ongoing mission, operation, exercise or requirement that may be compromised or otherwise adversely affected by public knowledge.

Any student who did not give advance written or verbal notice of service to the appropriate Coleman University Official may meet the notice requirement by submitting, at the time the student seeks readmission, an attestation to Coleman University that they performed service in the uniformed services that necessitated the student’s absence from Coleman University. A student who is readmitted to Coleman University under this section, shall be readmitted with the same academic status as such student had when such student last attended Coleman University.

Exception from Readmission Eligibility

Upon the occurrence of the following events a student’s eligibility might be terminated: 1. Separation of such person from the Armed Forces (including the National Guard and Reserves) with dishonorable or bad conduct discharge, or 2. Dismissal of such person permitted under section 1161(a) of Title 10, United States Code. 64

Debts and Over-Payments

A debt is established on a school when: • The student never attended classes for which he/she was certified regardless of the reason for non-attendance. • The student completely withdraws on or before the first day of the term. If student reduces, the debt is a student debt. • The school received payment for the wrong student. • The school received a duplicate payment. • The school submitted an amended enrollment certification and reported reduced tuition and fee charges, reduced Yellow Ribbon amount, or reduced both. (Reductions based on student’s action should be reported on a 1999B with the changes in the enrollment and will result in a debt to the student.) • The student died during the term, or before start of the term. • VA issued payment above the amount certified on the enrollment certification that was used to process the payment (VA data entry error). A debt is established on the student for Tuition/Fees/Yellow Ribbon when: • The student withdrew after the first day of the term (FDOT). • If the student completely withdrew on the FDOT, the student will be treated as never attended. • The student reduced hours whether the reduction occurred before or during the term. • If the student attended at least one day of any of the classes certified and a payment has been issued, any debt created by the reduction/withdrawal will be charged to the student. • The school submitted a change in enrollment (1999b) and reported a reduction in tuition, fees, and/or Yellow Ribbon due to student action reducing or terminating training. • If a student drops a course and adds a course so that there is no net change in training time, any change to tuition, fees, and/or Yellow Ribbon is a student debt.

Student Overpayments

When an overpayment is created, the VA sends a first demand letter notifying the student of the overpayment. When the letter is received, the student should immediately contact the VA regarding the debt. The response should be sent (in writing) directly to the office sending the letter, unless otherwise stated. Responding immediately and reaching a valid repayment agreement in a timely manner could prevent future benefits from being withheld. Due process (rights to appeal or waiver) as well as time limits for each step in the process is given in the first demand letter. Time limits - A request for waiver must be received no later than 180 days (6 months) from the date of the initial notification of the overpayment. If a waiver request is received within 30 days of the first demand (notification) letter, no benefits will be withheld until the decision is made. If benefits were withheld and the waiver request was found to be timely, a refund will be issued. If a waiver is granted, any funds that have been applied will be refunded. Note: If a waiver is requested after the first 30 days, but within 180 days, offset of benefits will continue. If a waiver is granted, the amount collected will be refunded. • Compromise offers can be made any time. The offer must be a lump sum offer, in writing, and accompanied by a current Financial Status Report. 65

• •

If a waiver is denied, the student will receive a written notification of the decision that will also indicate when future benefits will start being withheld. An appeal to a waiver denial must be made within one year from the date of the denial letter. Withholding of benefits will continue while this issue is pending. Second and third demand letters and one warning letter are sent before referrals are made to nationwide credit bureaus. Second and third demand letters and two warning letters are sent before referral to the Internal Revenue Service to offset the debt from any federal payments being made to the claimant.

Should a veteran/claimant have an overpayment and desire waiver consideration, a request must be received at VA no later than six (6) months from the date of initial notification of the overpayment. When an overpayment is established, written notification is sent to the veteran/claimant detailing the information needed to be considered for waiver. Briefly, the request must be in writing, specifically stating the reasons for the waiver request, accompanied with a financial status report listing all income, living expenses, installment contracts, assets, etc.

VA Healthcare

If you are a recently discharged veteran with service in a theater of combat operations since November 11, 1998, VA can provide you with free medical care for five years from your discharge from active duty for conditions possibly related to your combat service, regardless of your income status. Additionally, new conditions may be treated with a mandatory co-pay since all veterans meeting this criterion are automatically enrolled in Priority Group 6, regardless of income status. For more information, see Combat Veteran Eligibility (http://www.va.gov/healthbenefits/assets/documents/publications/IB-10438_Combat_Veteran_Eligibility.pdf).

Veterans Crisis Line

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a 24-hour, toll-free, confidential suicide prevention hotline available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress. You may reach this hotline by dialing 1-800-273-TALK (8255) (Press 1 if you are a Veteran). Calls are routed to the nearest crisis center in the national network of more than 150 crisis centers. The Lifeline’s national network of local crisis centers provides crisis counseling and mental health referrals day and night. Recognize the signs of risk for harming yourself: • Thinking about hurting/killing yourself • Looking for ways to kill yourself • Talking about death, dying, or suicide • Engaging in risky activities or self-destructive behavior without thinking (i.e., alcohol/drug abuse, weapons, etc.) • Hopelessness, feeling like there is no way out • Anxiety, agitation, sleeplessness, mood swings • Feeling like there is no reason to live • Rage or anger • Withdrawing from family and friends

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PART 6: Expenses and Financial Aid Expenses Tuition and Fees

The Board of Trustees sets tuition on the basis of overall costs. Primary among its considerations are the academic and professional excellence of the programs. Tuition is charged per unit for ALL registered courses, and tuition must be paid in advance of the class start date. Students who maintain continuous attendance are not subject to tuition increases. No student may register for a subsequent term or be issued a diploma or transcript, until all outstanding tuition, and/or fees are paid in full.

2015-2016 Tuition Schedules Associate’s Degree Application Fee Non-Refundable International Services Processing Fee Student Tuition Recovery Fund** Non-Refundable Technology Fee E-Textbooks (Cost per term) Tuition **State of California is currently not assessing the STRF fee.

Domestic $25 NA $0** $550 $100 $345/unit

International NA NA NA NA NA NA

Domestic $25 $0 $0** $550 (optional) $200 $345/unit

International NA NA NA NA NA NA

Bachelor’s Degree Application Fee Non-Refundable International Services Processing Fee Student Tuition Recovery Fund** Non-Refundable Technology Fee E-Textbooks (Cost per term) Tuition **State of California is currently not assessing the STRF fee.

Master’s 65-units Application Fee Non-Refundable International Services Processing Fee Student Tuition Recovery Fund Non-Refund-able ** Technology Fee E-Textbooks (Cost per term) Tuition

Domestic $25 NA $0** $550 (optional) $200 $450/unit

International $25 $500 $0** $550 (optional) $200 $450/unit

**State of California is currently not assessing the STRF fee.

Other Fees Diploma replacement Replacement key card

$25 $10 67

Returned check fee Transcripts Graduation Fee

$35 $15 $40 (UNDG) $60 (GRAD)

Cost of Attendance Total Charges per Term

Charges are based on full-time enrollment: 12 units for undergraduate programs, and 5 units for graduate programs Estimated Cost $4,240.00 Undergraduate Programs $2,250.00 Graduate Programs Note: The estimated totals above do not include one-time fees for application, international processing, technology, or STRF.

Estimated Schedule of Total Charges for Entire Program by Degree Program Estimated Degree Program Cost $38,754.00 Associate of Science in Game Programming Development and Design $34,512.00 Associate of Science in Network Security $34,512.00 Associate of Science in Software Development $64,207.00 Bachelor of Science in Game Programming Development and Design $64,207.00 Bachelor of Science in Network Security $64,207.00 Bachelor of Science in Software Development $29,250.00 Master of Business Administration $29,250.00 Master of Business Administration, Specialization in Health Care Management $29,250.00 Master of Science in Information Systems Management Note: The estimated totals above do not include the State Tuition Recovery Fee

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Tuition Payment Policy

Coleman University only offers the following payment options: • Payment in full by tuition deadline • Official University tuition payment plan set up through the Business Office • Financial Aid or other officially approved third party funding Students receiving Financial Aid who have an unmet balance after Financial Aid has been applied, must use one of the official payment options (payment plan or pay in full) to cover this unmet balance. Coleman University does not allow students to carry a balance from one term to the next. Tuition that is not expected to be covered by Financial Aid or other outside resources must be paid in full to the University by the tuition deadline. Enrollment constitutes a financial contract between the student and the University. Students’ rights to university services and benefits are contingent upon making all payments as agreed upon. If payments are not made when due, the university has the right to cancel a student’s registration, withhold grades, transcripts, diplomas, scholastic certificates and degrees, and impound final exams. Failure to maintain good financial standing with the University will result in denied participation in any tuition payment plan. In addition, balances due the university are reported to the credit agencies which may impact students’ credit rating. Prior to registering for a new term, students must pay any outstanding balances from any preceding terms. Students who do not pay their outstanding balances will not be permitted to register.

Financial Statements

Statements are mailed out monthly and are also available upon request.

Payment Due Date

In order to complete the enrollment process, students must pay all tuition and fee charges by the payment due date for the term or have a valid tuition payment plan on file by the payment due date for the term. Failure to do so will result in the cancellation of the student’s registration. Each term’s payment due date is published in the Academic Calendar. Tuition and fees for terms are due and payable on the Friday before the first day of the term.

Payment Methods

The University accepts the following forms of payments • Cash (USD) • Credit Card • Check or Money Order • Bank Wire An account paid by check that is returned by the bank uncollected is not considered paid. If a student’s check for tuition is returned by the bank for any reason, the student will be billed a $35 Returned Check Fee and the student’s registration may be cancelled. The university reserves the right to refuse payment by personal check from individuals who have previously had items returned unpaid by their bank and may require that all future payments be made by credit card, cashier’s check, money order or cash. Payments made through a bank wire must be initiated early enough to arrive by the tuition deadline. Coleman University recommends initiating bank wire transfers at least 10 business days prior to the tuition deadline. 69

Tuition Deferments

Tuition deferments may occur under the following circ*mstances: • Tuition Payment Plan If you have a balance and are not receiving Financial Aid or your balance is not covered by Financial Aid, AND you do not have a past due balance from a prior term, you may be eligible for a payment plan. A payment plan may be arranged by meeting with the Business Office. • Third-Party Tuition Assistance, including Title IV and Veteran Funds Some students are entitled to tuition assistance through their employer, a government agency, or other third party. If you are expecting another party to pay any part of your tuition and fees, all required paperwork must be received by the Business Office at least one week prior to the tuition deadline. If for any reason payment is not received from the third-party, the student is responsible for all outstanding charges. To qualify for third-party tuition assistance, the funding must be paid directly to Coleman University and not directly to the student. • Scholarship Deferment If a student is receiving a scholarship from an outside source and funds are not available by the tuition schedule due date, the student may defer payment pending receipt of the scholarship. To qualify, the student must apply for the deferment prior to the payment deadline and have documentation of the award. If the deferment is not obtained prior to the deadline, the student risks cancellation of registration. Upon receipt of the scholarship the student’s tuition must be paid in full. Students receiving tuition reimbursem*nts are not eligible.

Refund Policy

Student’s Right to Cancel 1. You have the right to cancel your program of instruction, without any penalty or obligations, through attendance at the first scheduled class session or the seventh (7) calendar day after enrollment, whichever is later. After the end of the cancellation period, you also have the right to stop school at any time; and you have the right to receive a pro rata refund if you have completed 60 percent or less of the scheduled days in the current payment period in your program through the last day of attendance. 2. Cancellation may occur when the student provides a written notice of cancellation at the following address: 8888 Balboa Avenue, San Diego, CA 92123-1506. This can be done by mail or by hand delivery. 3. The written notice of cancellation, if sent by mail, is effective when deposited in the mail properly addressed with proper postage. 4. The written notice of cancellation need not take any particular form and, however expressed, it is effective if it shows that the student no longer wishes to be bound by the Enrollment Agreement. 5. If the Enrollment Agreement is cancelled the school will refund the student any money he/she paid, less an application fee not to exceed $250.00, and any other non-refundable fees, within 45 days after the notice of cancellation is received.

Withdrawal from the Program

You may withdraw from the school at any time after the cancellation period (described above) and receive a pro rata refund if you have completed 60 percent or less of the scheduled days in the current payment period in your program through the last day of attendance. The refund will be less an application fee not to exceed $250.00, and any other non-refundable fees, within 70

45 days of withdrawal. If the student has completed more than 60% of the period of attendance for which the student was charged, the tuition is considered earned and the student will receive no refund. For the purpose of determining a refund under this section, a student shall be deemed to have withdrawn from a program of instruction when any of the following occurs: • The student notifies the institution of the student’s withdrawal or as of the date of the student’s withdrawal, whichever is later. • The institution terminates the student’s enrollment for failure to maintain satisfactory progress; failure to abide by the rules and regulations of the institution; absences in excess of maximum set forth by the institution; and/ or failure to meet financial obligations to the School. • The student has failed to attend class for 3 consecutive sessions in the same course. • Failure to return from a leave of absence. For the purpose of determining the amount of the refund, the date of the student’s withdrawal shall be deemed the last date of recorded attendance. The amount owed equals the daily charge for the program (total institutional charge, minus non-refundable fees, divided by the number of days in the program), multiplied by the number of days scheduled to attend, prior to withdrawal. For the purpose of determining when the refund must be paid, the student shall be deemed to have withdrawn at the end of twenty-one (21) calendar days. For programs beyond the current “payment period,” if you withdraw prior to the next payment period, all charges collected for the next period will be refunded. If any portion of the tuition was paid from the proceeds of a loan or third party, the refund shall be sent to the lender, third party or, if appropriate, to the state or federal agency that guaranteed or reinsured the loan. Any amount of the refund in excess of the unpaid balance of the loan shall be first used to repay any student financial aid programs from which the student received benefits, in proportion to the amount of the benefits received, and any remaining amount shall be paid to the student. If the student has received federal student financial aid funds, the student is entitled to a refund of moneys not paid from federal student financial aid program funds.

Refund Distribution

Once the refund liability for a student has been determined, the federal portion of the refund shall be distributed back to the federal program in the following manner: All refund monies shall first be applied to reduce the student’s Federal Unsubsidized Stafford, Federal Subsidized Stafford, or Federal PLUS loans. Any remaining refund monies will then be applied as a reduction to any other federal program awards if applicable, and if not, then to any non-federal sources. The University also follows the return of funds regulations, which went into effect October 7, 2000. The U.S. Department of Education’s Return of Title IV Funds Policy The amount of financial aid any student is eligible to receive to help offset the charges incurred is determined by a separate formula. This formula is a result of regulations adopted and enforced by the U.S. Department of Education. These regulations determine the amount of assistance that a student earns, following a pro rata formula based on payment period or period of enrollment. For example, if a student completes 30% of a payment period or a period 71

of enrollment, the student earns 30% of the assistance that he or she was scheduled to receive for that period. Students must understand that even though financial assistance in the form of loans or grants may have been or could have been applied to the student’s account before the student elects to withdraw, it is likely the student will not be able to use all of that federal financial assistance to meet his or her obligations to the University for tuition charges.

Suspension for Failure to Pay

Students who fail to pay their tuition or commit to a payment option by the posted deadline may be suspended from the University. In order to have their schedule reinstated, students will be required to provide the Business Office with payment in full, proof of guaranteed financial aid funds or complete a valid tuition payment plan. A Business Office Hold will be placed on a student account at any point if satisfactory payment arrangements have not been made or maintained. Any course that is added after the registration period must be paid in full before it can be added to the schedule and requires clearance from the Business Office.

Collections Fees

In the event that a student’s account is sent to collections for an unpaid balance, the student may be responsible for costs of the collections process and/or attorney fees.

Online Learning

There are no additional charges or fees assessed for any online learning service. Tuition for online courses is the same as for campus-based courses. Textbooks may be purchased from any external resource or borrowed from the Resource Center, if available.

Tuition Payment Plan

A Tuition Payment Plan must be completed by the student and be approved by the Business Office in order to be valid. • The payment schedule must reflect the most expeditious rate of payment possible, but never longer than the end of the student’s program. o Repeated late payments will nullify the agreement and all outstanding tuition immediately becomes payable in full. If financial problems arise, students should contact the Business Office immediately. o Defaulted payment plans from prior terms may cause a student to become ineligible for future Tuition Payment Plans. • Past due balances and tuition due from prior terms may also disqualify students from future payment plans. • Students who apply for a payment plan must have a source of funding for making payments prior to agreeing to a payment plan. • Failure to complete the tuition payment plan agreement can result in suspension.

International Students & Tuition Payment Plan

International students who are allowed to pay tuition in installments, per tuition payment plan agreement, are subject to mandatory administrative dismissal if the balance owed becomes greater than one payment, as agreed in the tuition payment plan agreement. If that student is on Curriculum Practical Training employment, the school must notify the employer to terminate 72

employment. Additionally, the university must report such activity to SEVP which may affect the student’s SEVIS record.

Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF)

You must pay the state-imposed assessment for the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) if all of the following applies to you: 1. You are a student in an educational program, who is a California resident, or are enrolled in a residency program, and prepay all or part of your tuition either by cash, guaranteed student loans, or personal loans, and 2. Your total charges are not paid by any third-party payer such as an employer, government program or other payer unless you have a separate agreement to repay the third party. You are not eligible for protection from the STRF and you are not required to pay the STRF assessment, if either of the following applies: 1. You are not a California resident, or are not enrolled in a residency program, or 2. Your total charges are paid by a third party, such as an employer, government program or other payer, and you have no separate agreement to repay the third party. The State of California created the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) to relieve or mitigate economic losses suffered by students in an educational program who are California residents, or are enrolled in a residency program attending certain schools regulated by the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education. You may be eligible for STRF if you are a California resident or are enrolled in a residency program, prepaid tuition, paid the STRF assessment, and suffered an economic loss as a result of any of the following: 1. The school closed before the course of instruction was completed. 2. The school’s failure to pay refunds or charges on behalf of a student to a third party for license fees or any other purpose, or to provide equipment or materials for which a charge was collected within 180 days before the closure of the school. 3. The school’s failure to pay or reimburse loan proceeds under a federally guaranteed student loan program as required by law or to pay or reimburse proceeds received by the school prior to closure in excess of tuition and other costs. 4. There was a material failure to comply with the Act or this Division within 30 days before the school closed or, if the material failure began earlier than 30 days prior to closure, the period determined by the Bureau. 5. An inability after diligent efforts to prosecute, prove, and collect on a judgment against the institution for a violation of the Act.

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Financial Aid

The Financial Aid Office is committed to providing assistance to qualified students who would otherwise be unable to pursue the attainment of their educational and professional goals. Most, but not all, financial aid is based on financial need as determined by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Some types of scholarship aid do not depend on student financial need. “Need” can be defined most simply as the difference between the total cost of attendance and those resources that the student and his or her family are expected to apply toward that cost of attendance. The Financial Aid Office coordinates federal, state, institutional, and private financial assistance programs. The Financial Aid Office is responsible for ascertaining that all policies and procedures comply with institutional, state, and federal regulations. There are many restrictions on eligibility for most financial aid programs offered at Coleman University. Students are expected to be aware of their rights, responsibilities, and the restrictions of the aid programs in which they participate. Several publications that describe students’ rights and responsibilities with regard to aid programs are available in the Financial Aid Office. Financial aid funds awarded while attending Coleman University are intended to supplement the resources students and their families already have available to them. All aid applications undergo a needs analysis calculation to determine the minimum amount of resources they will need to contribute to the total cost of the student’s education. Students should not expect their total financial need to be met by resources available through student financial aid programs. Students who intend to request financial assistance are expected to arrange an appointment with a financial aid officer as soon as registration has been completed. Financial aid officers are available on a walk-in or appointment basis to provide individual counseling to students who apply for financial aid.

Eligibility for Title IV Aid Programs

Coleman University students must meet the following criteria to be eligible for federal or state financial assistance: • Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen • Be enrolled in a program that leads to a degree • Not be in default on any loan under the Title IV programs • Not owe a refund on any grant under the Title IV programs • Demonstrate financial need as determined by the appropriate agency offering the financial assistance • Make satisfactory progress toward an educational objective (See “Standards of Satisfactory Progress.”) • Meet Selective Service requirements • Have a high school diploma or recognized equivalent

Dependency Status

Students who apply for financial aid must determine whether they qualify as independent (selfsupporting) students or as dependent students. Determination of a student’s dependency status is made in the student status section on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). If ANY of the following circ*mstances apply to you, you are an independent student; you will not have to provide parental information. If NONE of the following circ*mstances apply to you, you will be asked to provide parental information. 74

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

You are 24 years or older You are married You will be working on a master’s degree You are serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces You are a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces You have children, and you provide more than half of their support After you turned age 13, both of your parents were deceased You have dependents (other than children or your spouse) who live with you, and you provide more than half of their support You were in foster care since turning age 13 You were a dependent or ward of the court since turning age 13 You are currently or you were in legal guardianship You are currently or were an emancipated minor You are homeless or you are at risk of being homeless

Students who claim to be independent may be asked to provide documentation to verify their dependency status prior to receiving financial aid. Students who want to be considered independent due to circ*mstances other than those listed should contact a financial aid officer prior to completing the FAFSA.

Participating Programs Federal Programs

Coleman University participates in the following financial programs: • Federal Direct Loan Subsidized and Unsubsidized • Federal Direct Loan Grad Plus for Graduate Students • Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (FPLUS) • Federal Pell Grant • Federal Supplementary Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) • Federal Work Study Program

Institutional Program

Coleman University sponsors the Presidential Scholarship program for incoming students.

Application Process for Federal Programs

This section applies to U.S. citizens and permanent residents only. Most United States citizens and permanent resident graduate students may qualify for U.S. federal financial aid programs or for aid from the state of California. In order to qualify, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which provides an in-depth analysis of the financial condition of the student and his/her family. This analysis (done on a yearly basis) determines how much the student/family is expected to contribute toward the cost of education. This figure is called the “expected family contribution,” or EFC. Parents’ income and asset information is included in the EFC calculation for dependent students. To determine if you are independent from your parents for financial aid, you will need to answer the questions on the FAFSA application. Students who received financial aid for the previous year should receive a renewal email from the Federal Department of Education or your Department of Education PIN number sometime in January. Students are encouraged to file their renewal FAFSA applications electronically at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. 75

If you do not receive a Renewal email from the Federal Department of Education or if you did not apply for Financial Aid for the previous year, but wish to apply for coming award year, you should do the following: • Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You may complete the FAFSA online at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. Regardless of how an applicant completes the renewal FAFSA, the March 2 priority filing deadline applies for undergraduate and graduate students to be eligible for campus based aid. Applicants should make sure the Institution Code for Coleman University (009273) is indicated on their FAFSA or Renewal Form. • It is the student’s and/or applicant’s responsibility to obtain and file all the forms by the proper deadlines in order to be considered for aid at Coleman University. Students selected for verification will have 30 days from the date of notification to turn in all necessary documents. For entering students, notification of financial aid is given in the form of an estimate letter shortly after admission. Accepted students also receive information and forms concerning application for other available loan programs.

Determining Financial Need

Financial aid eligibility for need-based aid is determined using the following formula: Cost of Attendance - Expected Family Contribution = Financial Need Financial need is the difference between what a family is expected to contribute toward the cost of the education and the actual cost of the education. For example, if the cost of education is $20,000 per year including both tuition and living expenses in the local area, and the family is expected to contribute $5,000, then the student’s need is $15,000. The aid students receive from all sources of aid (including non-need based aid) may not exceed their cost of attendance. Many students may choose only to seek aid for the cost of tuition and fees, since their housing, food, and other basic household costs are supported with ongoing family income.

Cost of Attendance and Standard Student Expense Cost of attendance includes the following items: • Tuition • Fees • Books and Supplies • Room and Board • Transportation • Other Educational Costs

Students can meet with a financial aid officer to discuss itemized totals for expenses.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy for Students Receiving U.S. Federal Financial Aid

The academic requirements that students who receive U.S. federal assistance must meet to maintain their eligibility have changed due to new guidelines adopted by the Federal Department of Education effective July 1, 2011. Students must now meet new standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). These SAP standards may be different from, and at times, more stringent than, the satisfactory academic progress policies adopted by Coleman University’s academic programs. For Coleman 76

University’s SAP policy see Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy. The federal guidelines require that Coleman University’s Financial Aid Office conduct reviews of student progress at the end of each term to determine if students are making satisfactory progress towards earning their degree and therefore remain eligible for federal financial aid. You need to make satisfactory academic progress in order to continue receiving federal student aid. In other words, you have to make good enough grades, and complete enough classes (credits, hours, etc.), to keep moving toward successfully completing your degree or certificate in a time period that’s acceptable to your school. Each school has a satisfactory academic progress policy for financial aid purposes; to see your school’s SAP, you can ask someone at the financial aid office. Your school’s policy will tell you • What grade-point average (or equivalent standard) you need to maintain; • How quickly you need to be moving toward graduation (for instance, how many credits you should have successfully completed by the end of each year); • How an incomplete class, withdrawal, repeated class, change of major, or transfer of credits from another school affects your satisfactory academic progress; • How often your school will evaluate your progress; • What will happen if you fail to make satisfactory academic progress when your school evaluates you; • Whether you are allowed to appeal your school’s decision that you haven’t made satisfactory academic progress (reasons for appeal usually include the death of a member of your family, your illness or injury, or other special circ*mstances); and • How you can regain eligibility for federal student aid.

Course Load & Financial Aid Programs Full-time

Graduate students: 5 units of required coursework toward degree completion Undergraduate students: 12 units of required coursework toward degree completion

Half-time

Graduate students: Does not apply Undergraduate students: 8 units of required coursework toward degree completion

Federal Programs

To be eligible for the Federal Direct Loan Programs, a student must be enrolled at least half time in units related to the identified program of study. Students enrolled less than half time are not eligible for the Federal Direct Loan programs.

Student Loan Fund Release Policy (Disbursem*nt)

Annual Financial Aid awards will be divided by the number of terms for which the student is enrolled and disbursed by term as long as the student meets the eligibility requirements for the aid. If all paperwork, Stafford entrance test, verification and loan funds are received, student loan funds may post to the student’s school account within the first two weeks of the first day of the term. However, Department of Education rules allow fourteen (14) days from the first day of the term to return excess payments to students. Any questions regarding delay in financial aid refund after aid has dispersed to the student’s statement should be directed to the Business Office. 77

Loan Repayment

If a student receives a loan to pay for the educational program, the student will have the responsibility to repay the full amount of the loan plus interest, less the amount of any refund to the lender.

Financial Aid Refunds/Return of Title IV Funds

If a recipient of Title IV student financial aid withdraws from Coleman University or does not complete the term for which he/she has paid, he/she may be entitled to a partial refund of his/her tuition based on the Return of Title IV Funds Policy. Under this policy, the University will determine how much Title IV student financial aid a student has earned based on the period he/she was in attendance. Any unearned Title IV student financial aid will be returned to the Title IV programs. This pro rata schedule is calculated up through the 60% point in time of the enrollment period at Coleman University for which the student was charged (measured from the first day of classes through the end of formal instruction). Funds returned to any Title IV student financial aid program may not exceed those disbursed to the student (or credited to his/her account) from that program. All Title IV refunds will be made within 45 days of the date the student officially withdraws, the date the school determines that the student has unofficially withdrawn, or within 45 days of the date the student fails to return from an approved leave of absence or notifies the school that he/she will not be returning, whichever is earlier. For financial aid purposes a student is only allowed a leave of absence for a maximum of 180 days within a 12 month period. If a student is granted a leave of absence for a longer period by the academic department the student for financial aid purposes will be considered a withdrawal and a return to lender calculation will be completed. Any recipient of Title IV federal student financial aid who withdraws or does not complete the term, must complete a clearance process, including a financial aid exit interview for students who have received educational loan assistance. The clearance and exit interview will explain students’ rights and responsibilities as they pertain to tuition refunds, financial aid refunds and return of Title IV funds and educational loans. (See Return of Title IV Funds examples below.) Any refund calculated must be returned first to the Title IV programs. Refunds are allocated in the following order: 1. Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loan Program 2. Subsidized Federal Direct Loan Program 3. Federal Perkins Direct Loan Program 4. Federal PLUS/GRADPLUS Loan Program 5. Federal Pell Grant Program 6. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) Program 7. Any other Title IV program 8. Other federal, state, private, or institutional student financial aid programs.

Repayments

A repayment is cash disbursed directly to the student for non-institutional costs that must be repaid to the Title IV programs. A student will owe a repayment if he or she received a cash disbursem*nt in excess of what was reasonably incurred before the student ceased attendance. Federal Family Education Loan Program and Federal Work Study funds are excluded from repayment calculations. Repayments are allocated in the following order: 1. Federal Perkins Direct Loan Program 2. Federal Pell Grant Program 78

3. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) Program 4. Any other non-loan Title IV program 5. Other state, private, or institutional student financial assistance programs.

Descriptions of Aid Offered by Coleman University

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)

These federal funds are awarded to undergraduate students with exceptional financial need who are pursuing their first undergraduate degree. Priority is given to Federal Pell Grant recipients with zero (0) Expected Family Contribution (EFC) and on a first come first serve basis.

Federal Work Study Program (FWS)

FWS is an employment program largely funded by the federal government and supplemented by employer contributions. The goals of the program are to help students meet their educational expenses, encourage participation in community service activities, and instill a sense of social responsibility and commitment to the community. FWS strives to complement and reinforce the student employees’ educational programs and career goals. Under the Federal Work-Study (FWS) program, students are employed in part-time jobs on campus or in other nonprofit agencies to help meet a portion of their cost of attendance. FWS earnings are considered taxable income and must be reported as such. Doctoral extension students are eligible to work under FWS as long as they are enrolled at least half-time (3 credits). Students may earn up to the maximum amount specified in their financial aid package. On average, FWS students work 10-20 hours per week during the academic year. The actual amount earned depends on the student’s employability, class schedule, and the number of hours worked. Each year, at least seven percent of an eligible institution’s FWS allocation must be used for Community Service. Coleman University encourages students to investigate opportunities for on-campus community service employment. In general, community services include: 1. Health care, child care, literacy training, education (including tutorial services), welfare, social services, transportation, housing and neighborhood improvement, public safety, crime prevention and control, recreation, rural development and community improvement 2. Support for students (other than for an institution’s own students) with disabilities 3. Activities in which a FWS student serves as a mentor for such purposes: A. Tutoring B. Supporting educational and recreational activities C. Counseling, including career counseling

Federal William D Ford Direct Loan

The following information pertains to the Federal William D. Ford Direct Loan. Starting July 1, 2010, all student borrowers will be using Direct Loan as their lender which includes the following programs: • Federal William D. Ford Subsidized Direct Loan (for Undergraduate students only) • Federal William D. Ford Unsubsidized Direct Loan • Federal William D. Ford Direct Loan Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students • Federal William D. Ford Grad Plus for Graduate Student Direct Loan

Federal Subsidized Direct Loan and Federal Unsubsidized Direct Loan Programs

These are long-term, low-interest loans borrowed directly from Direct Loan as the lender. 79

There are two types of Direct Loans – subsidized and unsubsidized. Eligibility for subsidized Direct Loans is based on financial need (demonstrated via the FAFSA or Renewal Form) and they are only available to undergraduate students. Students who do not demonstrate (sufficient) need may borrow unsubsidized Direct Loans. Maximum loan eligibility is indicated on each student’s financial aid award letter. When students are eligible for a subsidized Direct Loan, the government pays the interest that accrues on the loan while in school. Students receiving an unsubsidized Direct Loan are charged the interest on the loan while in school, in grace period and in deferment. Starting July 1, 2013 the interest rate for a Subsidized and Unsubsidized Stafford loan for undergraduate students is variable with an 8.25% cap.

Annual Loan Limits Additional Unsubsidized

(Subsidized and Limits for Independent* Unsubsidized) Student Borrowers Subsidized Freshmen $3,500 Sophom*ores 4,500 Juniors/Seniors 5,500 Graduates 0

Unsubsidized $6,000 6,000 7,000 20,500

If you are eligible for a Federal Direct Loan you must complete a copy of your current Financial Aid Award indicating how much you wish to borrow. Moreover, if you are a first time borrower, you must complete and submit a Master Promissory Note electronically through www.studentloans.gov. All students are required to complete the Financial Awareness Counseling at www.studentloans.gov.

Federal GRADPLUS for Graduate Students

The Federal GRADPLUS for Graduate students is a federal loan program. The interest rate is 6.41%. Interest is charged on the loan once disbursem*nt is made to the school as it is with the unsubsidized Direct. Students must be preapproved for the loan as it is dependent on the credit of the borrower. A separate Master Promissory Note must be filled out for this loan through the lender.

Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS)

The Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) is a federal loan program available for parents of undergraduate students. Interest rates are a fixed rate of 6.41% for those that use Direct Loan as their lender. The Federal Direct PLUS may be used to replace the expected Parent and/or Student Contribution to supplement the total financial aid package up to the amount of the budget.

Institutional Scholarship Program

(Effective for students starting the January 5, 2015 module and forward)

A limited number of scholarships for students are available. Students who wish to be considered should complete a FAFSA for the current academic year, and submit the University Scholarship Application, which can be obtained through the Financial Aid Office. There is no deadline for applications. However, students are encouraged to apply early, as funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Scholarship awards may only be applied to tuition.

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Legacy Scholarship

(Effective for students starting the January 5, 2015 module and forward)

Scholarship is for: • Students who have relatives who were graduates of the University; • Graduates who return for their first master’s degree; or • Graduates of Coleman Tech High School. Award amount: • $1,000 per academic year (30 weeks, 3 quarters) o A total of $90,000 in scholarship funds is available each year for eligible Coleman University students who apply. Disbursem*nt and Renewal: • Students who are awarded this scholarship will receive the first $1,000 when they begin school. • For all subsequent academic years, the student must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA to remain eligible. Failure to maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA will result in loss of the scholarship for subsequent terms. Presidential Scholarship Scholarship is for: • Coleman University students who display financial need Award amount: •

Up to $1,000 per academic year (30 weeks, 3 quarters); o A total of $90,000 in scholarship funds is available each year for eligible Coleman University students who apply.

Disbursem*nt and Renewal: • Students who are awarded this scholarship will receive the first $1,000 when they begin school. • For all subsequent academic years, the student must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA to remain eligible. Failure to maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA will result in loss of the scholarship for subsequent terms.

The Yellow Ribbon Program

Scholarship is for: • Veterans who have served at least 36 months of active duty following September 10, 2001 • Veterans who were honorably discharged from active duty for a service related disability and who served 30 continuous days following September 10, 2001 • Dependents of veterans eligible for Transfer of Entitlement of the Post-9/11 GI Award amount: • Up to $3000 per academic year

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Other Aid Sources Alternative Loans

Alternative loans, offered by private lenders, help bridge the gap between the actual cost of a student’s education and the limited amount the government allows a student to borrow in its programs.

Corporate Tuition Assistance

Many companies and government agencies award tuition reimbursem*nt to employees. Students should check with their employer for information on how to apply for this employee development fringe benefit.

Veteran Affairs Funding

Please see Veteran Affairs for more information.

Aid for Native Americans

Native American students who can prove membership in a federally recognized tribe may receive educational grants from the federal Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Applications for BIA grants for California tribes are available by writing the Bureau’s Office of Indian Education, 2800 Cottage Way, Sacramento, CA 95825 or by calling (916) 978-4680. • Student may not owe an overpayment on any Title IV educational grant or be in default on a Title IV educational loan unless satisfactory payment arrangements are made to repay or otherwise resolve the overpayment or default • Student must complete the verification process, if selected to do so, by submitting a signed copy of federal tax forms and any other required documents

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PART 7: Administrative Policies Consumer Information

Any questions a student may have regarding this catalog that have not been satisfactorily answered by the institution may be directed to:

Accrediting Council of Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS) 750 First Street N.E., Suite 980 Washington DC, 20002-4241 Phone (202) 336-6780 Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education P.O. Box 980818 West Sacramento, CA 95798-0818, www.bppe.ca.gov Phone: (888) 370-7589 (toll-free) Fax: (916) 263- 1897 As a prospective student, you are encouraged to review this catalog prior to signing an enrollment agreement. You are also encouraged to review the School Performance Fact Sheet, which must be provided to you prior to signing an enrollment agreement. Coleman University has never filed a bankruptcy petition, operated as a debtor in possession or had a petition of bankruptcy filed against it under Federal law.

Disclosure of Release of Information Student Records

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. To protect the privacy of students, the law sets certain conditions on the disclosure of personal information kept by the University. Coleman University informs students of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended. This Act, with which the institution intends to comply fully, was designated to protect the privacy of education records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their education records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act. Policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act. Answers to questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and copies of the complete student records privacy policy may be obtained from the Registrar’s Office.

Statement on Diversity

Coleman University is committed to providing all students with essential tools for achieving academic success, regardless of race/ethnicity, sex/gender, socioeconomic class, age, religious beliefs, political views, sexual orientation, or differing abilities. The goal of the University is to foster community and to develop students who exhibit social responsibility, equality, and productive citizenship in an increasingly global society. Each member of the Coleman University 83

community has a responsibility to honor this commitment to supporting a diverse and inclusive campus. Coleman University does not tolerate acts of discrimination, harassment, or intimidation, which compromise the integrity of the University. The University will take necessary action to prevent, correct, and where indicated, discipline unlawful, intimidating, or other inappropriate behavior. Students should report concerns to Student Services.

Statement of Non-Discrimination (Policy)

Coleman University does not discriminate based on race, color, national origin, sex/gender, disability, or age in its programs and/or activities. The following official has been designated to handle inquiries regarding Coleman University’s policies of nondiscrimination: Coleman University President 8888 Balboa Avenue San Diego, CA 92123-1506 (858) 499-0202

Sexual Harassment

The prohibition against sexual harassment, a form of discrimination on the basis of sex, is set forth in the University Non-Discrimination Policy. The term “sexual harassment” means unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal, visual, or physical conduct of a sexual nature. This behavior is unacceptable in the academic environment and in other University-related settings such as University-sponsored activities or University-related social events. The entire policy is available in the Human Resources Office.

Student-Initiated Discrimination Grievance

It is University policy that all persons should enjoy freedom from unlawful discrimination of any kind, including harassment or retaliation for reporting a complaint. This policy applies to prohibit discrimination between members of the University community, including between students and between employees and students. Coleman University encourages prompt reporting of complaints so that a rapid response can be made and appropriate action can be taken. Note that reporting a complaint need not be limited to someone who was the target of the discrimination. The compliance officers listed in the section on non-discrimination and others are available to help students resolve problems informally. The University encourages discussion between the parties directly involved in a grievance, especially in the early stages of a dispute before the respective parties have assumed official or public positions which may polarize the dispute and render a solution more difficult. In any event, students have the right to file a formal written grievance—either initially or if informal resolution is not possible.

Student Grievance Procedure

The following procedures are available to any Coleman University student to resolve any grievance directly affecting the student by any member of the University community while acting in an official capacity. Students should meet with his/her Academic Advisor to discuss the process. 1. Informal Resolution: Students wishing to bring an issue of concern to the attention of the university should first, immediately, contact, within the academic term term of any occurrence giving rise to the issue or the time they could reasonably have learned of such occurrence, the person responsible for the matter being presented (the respondent) and attempt to resolve the concern informally. Students should always 84

make a good faith attempt to resolve an issue through one or more discussions about the issue with the person or people most directly involved. Students who are uncertain of how to proceed may consult their Academic Advisor, who will identify the appropriate person. At the request of the student, the Academic Advisor can arrange a meeting of the parties, attend that meeting, and attempt to aid in the resolution of the issue of concern. 2. Formal Complaint: If the issue of concern is not resolved within two (2) weeks after the student directly contacted the appropriate person to attempt an informal resolution, a student may obtain review by submitting a Formal Complaint within three (3) weeks of the first direct contact with his/her Academic Advisor. The Formal Complaint should identify the issue of concern to include the facts and evidence supporting the complaint, indicate what redress the complainant seeks, and provide a brief history of the attempts to resolve the issue. The Director of Student Services may meet with the complainant and with such other persons he or she shall deem appropriate for the purpose of ascertaining the facts and attempting to resolve the complaint; the Director of Student Services, in conjunction with appropriate personnel will render a written decision regarding the complaint to the complainant and the respondent within two (2) weeks. 3. Grievance: The Grievance Procedure may be used only if the Informal Resolution and Formal Complaint processes above have been followed and have been unsuccessful in resolving the matter. By completing the Grievance Form, to be submitted no later than one (1) week following the issue of the Formal Complaint decision, the student may request an appeal by filing a Grievance to be reviewed by Grievance Committee, to be made up of the university staff and or administrators. This committee will investigate and meet concerning the grievance within two weeks of the submission and issue a written decision within three days of the hearing. All decisions of the Grievance Committee are final. Note: Formal Complaints and Grievances should be submitted within 90 days of the initial occurrence. Formal Complaints and Grievances submitted after 90 days of the occurrence will not be considered. This does not supersede other specifically stated timelines contained within this catalog. All materials submitted and gathered regarding Formal Complaints and Grievances will be stored electronically and will also be placed in the student’s file. Complaints about the implementation of this grievance policy may be addressed to the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools, 750 First Street N.E., Suite 980, Washington, DC 20002-4241; Phone: (202) 336-6780 A student or any member of the public may file a complaint about this institution with Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education by calling 888.370.7589 toll-free or by completing a complaint form, which can be obtained on the bureau’s Internet Web site, www.bppe.ca.gov.

Non-Academic Student Code of Conduct & Ethics

Students are subject to the civil laws and regulations in effect at the location where they are enrolled and the academic and non-academic codes of conduct published in the University’s catalog. The policy of the University places responsibility on its students, who are expected to conduct themselves with discretion and with regard to their fellow students and to the University. 85

Students must observe school regulations willingly, devote themselves seriously to their studies, and be honorable and upright in their living as well as in their associations with the University. A student’s agreement to abide by the policies and procedures of the University is implicitly confirmed when the student accepts Coleman University’s admissions offer through the signing of the Enrollment Agreement and upon registration each term. Students are expected to respect the various administrative and academic policies listed in the University catalog and to completely and accurately provide all financial aid information required. Failure to abide by any of the above constitutes grounds for probation or dismissal from the University. Students who engage in conduct that disrupts the orderly functioning of the University may be subject to probation or dismissal from the program as set forth in the academic and nonacademic codes of conduct. Any student who is dismissed because of conduct detrimental to the best interest of the University or student body will not be reinstated. In the case of dismissal for cause, no fees will be refunded.

Student Privacy & Identity Policy for Distance Education and Online Computing

Login credentials distributed to the student by Coleman University are used to both protect the privacy and to verify the identity of the student. Credentials are considered privileged information; a student who knowingly shares credential information will face disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion from the university. Coleman University reserves the right to require verification of identity at enrollment and at any time thereafter as it deems appropriate. Students who fail to provide verification of identity will face disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion from the institution.

Acceptable Use Policy for Computing Resources

In support of Coleman University’s mission to prepare students for technology-focused careers, the University provides computing, networking, and information resources to its students, faculty, and staff. These resources include access to local, national, and international sources of information in an atmosphere that encourages sharing of information, access to a rich variety of services, and open and free discussion. The issue of acceptable use confronts all companies and institutions that make use of the Internet as an informational or business tool. As technology professionals, Coleman University graduates will face this issue at their places of employment. Students must assume responsibility for the privilege of using these resources. All existing federal, state and local laws apply, as well as all Coleman University regulations and policies, including not only those laws and regulations that are specific to computers and networks, but also those that may apply generally to personal conduct. The information set forth below further defines user responsibilities and presents examples and consequences of misuse.

User Responsibilities

The University’s computers and networks provide the ability to communicate with other users worldwide. Such open access is a privilege, and requires that individual users act responsibly. Users must respect the rights of other users, respect the integrity of the systems and related physical resources, and observe all relevant laws, regulations, and contractual obligations.

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Coleman University grants to members of the Coleman University community free use of computing resources. As a condition of using these resources, users must observe the following guidelines: • Use the facility only for University-related purposes, or for purposes in accordance with established policies and procedures. • Respect the rights of other users to work in a growth-oriented environment, conducive to learning and research. • Respect the integrity and security of the systems and related physical resources, and observe all relevant laws, regulations, and ethical obligations. • Make economical and wise use of the resources that are shared with others, thus enabling access to these resources by the greatest possible number of users. • Respect the rights of others to the privacy of their programs and data. • All computer use must conform to the spirit of these guidelines. Inappropriate use will be considered an offense to the University community.

Examples of Misuse

The following list, while not exhaustive, characterizes unacceptable behavior and misuse of computer resources, which may be subject to disciplinary action: • Violating applicable federal or state laws or University regulations, including but not limited to the transmission of inappropriate material, copyright infringement, theft of or unauthorized access to or use of Coleman University resources. • Giving other people access to a Coleman University computer account without authorization. • Engaging in activities that compromise computer security or disrupt services on any Coleman University network. • Altering Coleman University system software or hardware configurations or circumventing resource control mechanisms. • Knowingly running or installing on any computer system or network, a program intended to damage or to place excessive load on a computer system or network. • Using Coleman University facilities or equipment for non-academic or commercial purposes, or for personal financial gain. • Posting material to social media, news groups, or mail lists that is illegal, inappropriate, or otherwise at variance with accepted codes of network etiquette. Sending electronic junk mail or chain letters. • Wasting resources: leaving non-essential processes running when you are not logged in.

Consequences of Misuse

As in any disciplinary matter, students and staff receive fair and reasonable due process. Misuse of computing, networking, or information resources may result in the loss of access to special Coleman University privileges. Users may be held accountable for their conduct under any applicable campus policies, procedures or agreements. Any actions which deter other users from doing their work or completing exams, or which would otherwise be deemed malicious will result in disciplinary action, including possible dismissal. Activities authorized by Coleman University instructors and staff officials for security or performance testing are not considered unacceptable behavior.

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Firearms

The use or possession of firearms is prohibited on campus property.

Food and Drink

No food or beverages are allowed in the hallways, computer labs, or classroom areas at any time, with the exception of water in a capped plastic bottle.

Drugs, Narcotics, and Alcohol

Coleman University prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of drugs or narcotics and alcohol on campus property. A student who does not abide by this regulation is subject to disciplinary action without warning. Such action may be in the form of probation, suspension, or dismissal. The student may also be subject to prosecution under federal, state, and local laws. Coleman University personnel are asked to report suspected violators to the administration. The University maintains a directory of agencies and support groups where students with drug and alcohol problems can seek help.

Personal Appearance

Students are preparing for careers. Now is the time to develop the habits of appropriate dress that will be required on the job. Many prospective employers visit the University. It is important that students be properly dressed in order to make the best possible impression. Students whose attire is unsuitable for the academic environment will be referred to an officer of the University and may be sent home. Attire should not be such to cause distraction within the learning environment. This includes clothing that is too revealing in nature or has inappropriate logos or wording.

Smoking

Smoking is permitted only in designated areas outside the buildings of Coleman University. Smoking is not permitted inside any part of the University’s buildings as mandated by California law not permitting employers to knowingly or intentionally permit the smoking of tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, in an enclosed space.

Cancellation and Withdrawal Policies Student’s Right to Cancel

Students have the right to cancel their agreement for a program of instruction, without any penalty or obligations, through attendance at the first scheduled class session or the seventh calendar day after enrollment, whichever is later. After the end of the cancellation period, the student also has the right to stop school at any time; and the student has the right to receive a pro rata refund if he/she has completed 60 percent or less of the scheduled days in the current payment period in his/her program through the last day of attendance. Cancellation may occur when the student provides a written notice of cancellation at the following address: 8888 Balboa Avenue, San Diego, CA 92123-1506. This can be done by mail or by hand delivery. The written notice of cancellation, if sent by mail, is effective when deposited in the mail properly addressed with proper postage. The written notice of cancellation need not take any particular form and, however expressed, it is effective if it shows that the student no longer wishes to be bound by the Enrollment Agreement.

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If the Enrollment Agreement is cancelled, the school will refund the student any money he/she paid, less an application fee not to exceed $250.00, within 45 days after the notice of cancellation is received.

Student’s Right to Withdraw

You may withdraw from the school at any time after the cancellation period (described above) and receive a pro rata refund if you have completed 60 percent or less of the scheduled days in the current payment period in your program through the last day of attendance. The refund will be less an application fee not to exceed $250.00. If the student has completed more than 60% of the period of attendance for which the student was charged, the tuition is considered earned and the student will receive no refund. For the purpose of determining a refund under this section, a student shall be deemed to have withdrawn from a program of instruction when any of the following occurs: • The student notifies the institution of the student’s withdrawal or as of the date of the student’s withdrawal, whichever is later. • The institution terminates the student’s enrollment for failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress, failure to abide by the rules and regulations of the institution, absences in excess of maximum set forth by the institution, and/or failure to meet financial obligations to the School. • The student has failed to attend class for 14 calendar days. • Failure to return from a leave of absence. For the purpose of determining the amount of the refund, the date of the student’s withdrawal shall be deemed the last date of recorded attendance. The amount owed equals the daily charge for the program (total institutional charge, minus non-refundable fees, divided by the number of days in the program), multiplied by the number of days scheduled to attend, prior to withdrawal. For the purpose of determining when the refund must be paid, the student shall be deemed to have withdrawn at the end of 14 calendar days. For programs beyond the current “payment period,” if you withdraw prior to the next payment period, all charges collected for the next period will be refunded. If any portion of the tuition was paid from the proceeds of a loan or third party, the refund shall be sent to the lender, third party or, if appropriate, to the state or federal agency that guaranteed or reinsured the loan. Any amount of the refund in excess of the unpaid balance of the loan shall be first used to repay any student financial aid programs from which the student received benefits, in proportion to the amount of the benefits received, and any remaining amount shall be paid to the student. If the student has received federal student financial aid funds, the student is entitled to a refund of moneys not paid from federal student financial aid program funds.

Suspension, Dismissal and Reinstatement

If the terms of an academic probation are not met, the student may be suspended for at least one term. A suspended student must petition for reinstatement. Reinstatement is neither automatic nor guaranteed. A student who has been suspended twice must sit out six months before petitioning for reinstatement. A student who has incurred two suspensions will be permanently dismissed from the program and the University on the third offense. Students who are suspended (for SAP, plagiarism, code of conduct, etc.), must sit out one full term (currently 10 weeks for undergraduate level and 5 weeks for graduate level). The student will be required to submit a written reinstatement request, which will be reviewed by the Reinstatement Committee. The Reinstatement Committee will approve the request, deny the 89

request, or request a meeting with the student for further consideration. If a student is approved for reinstatement, he/she must complete the admissions process for re-entry.

Extenuating Circ*mstances

If the Reinstatement Committee, convened by the Vice President/Academics, determines that extenuating circ*mstances are present in the student’s case sufficient to have prevented the student from reasonably completing his or her work in a satisfactory manner, the student may be reinstated into the program. The student may be required to present evidence of such circ*mstances. Extenuating circ*mstances to be considered include, but are not limited to: • Personal illness. • Confirmed illness or death in the immediate family. (Immediate family includes spouse, parents, grandparents, children, and siblings.) • Active duty military service, including active duty for training. The appeal must present any mitigating circ*mstances that the student considers to be related to his or her unsatisfactory progress. If the Reinstatement Committee determines that mitigating circ*mstances were present in the student’s failure to maintain satisfactory progress, the student will be reinstated and financial aid will resume.

Reinstatement: Appeal of Suspension from the University

A student who has been suspended for violation of student responsibilities may appeal the decision by requesting, within seven days of the date of dismissal, a hearing with the Reinstatement Committee. This committee includes Coleman University faculty and/or staff. The decision of the committee is final.

Identification Badges

At orientation, new students are issued identification badges and a security badge. For security reasons, these badges must be displayed at all times when a student is on the University grounds. A replacement fee of $10 will be charged to re-issue a lost security badge.

Visitors On Campus Adults Visitors

All guests must sign in at the front desk. Visitors on campus should be on campus to address university related business and are required to adhere to those codes of conduct not pertaining to academics as listed in this catalog.

Children on Campus

Coleman University values the safety of all its employees, students, and visitors. Unaccompanied children are not allowed on campus and must be supervised by an adult all times. Children are not allowed in classrooms or labs. The university is not liable for any incident involving unaccompanied and unsupervised children on campus.

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PART 8: Academic Policies Academic Code of Conduct & Ethics

The University is committed to principles of scholastic honesty. Its members are expected to abide by ethical standards both in their conduct and in their exercise of responsibility towards other members of the community. The policy of the University places responsibility on its students, who are expected to conduct themselves with discretion and with regard to their fellow students and to the University. Students must observe school regulations willingly, devote themselves seriously to their studies, and be honorable and upright in their living as well as in their associations with the University. This Academic Code of Conduct and Ethics is established to lend greater definition and meaning to the principles of scholastic honesty and integrity and to outline standards that will guide the actions of the academic community. Any student who violates the Academic Code of Conduct and Ethics will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from the University. A student accused of a violation is guaranteed an impartial hearing and the right to an appeal. Procedures and guidelines for the hearings and the appeals are described in this section. Students also need to be in compliance with the Non- Academic Student Code of Conduct and Ethics, which is included in this catalog. Any student who is dismissed because of conduct detrimental to the best interest of the University or student body will not be reinstated.

Students

As it is with other members of the academic community, each student’s conduct is expected to be in accordance with the standards of the University.

Faculty and Administration

Faculty and administration are obligated to the University and to the students they teach and serve to uphold ethical standards. They must deal fully and fairly with instances of academic misconduct. Any evidence that a faculty member has intentionally acted in a manner not consistent with this policy (including failure to report instances of suspected misconduct) will be subject to a referral to the faculty member’s Dean for appropriate action.

Acts of Misconduct

The Academic Code of Conduct and Ethics prohibits certain acts of misconduct by students enrolled at the University. Other University policies and procedures may also apply. Depending on the circ*mstances, the acts of misconduct described below may be considered as either a violation or an infraction. Students who engage in conduct that disrupts the orderly functioning of the University may be subject to probation or dismissal from the program as set forth in the academic and nonacademic codes of conduct. In the case of dismissal for cause, no fees will be refunded.

Violations (Academic Dishonesty)

Academic dishonesty is cause for disciplinary action up to and including dismissal from Coleman University. Presenting another person’s ideas, methods, course work, or test answers with the intention that they be taken as one’s own is theft of a special kind. It defrauds the originator of the work, the institution, its graduates, its students, and its future students. The student has full responsibility for the authenticity of all academic work and examinations submitted. A student who appears to have violated this policy must submit to a hearing with the reporting instructor and the associate dean. If it is determined that a violation occurred, the 91

matter will be referred to an officer of the University with recommendations for an appropriate penalty. The student may be dismissed, suspended, or given another penalty. The following acts are examples of violations. 1. Examination Behavior: Any intentional giving or use of external assistance during an examination without the express permission of the faculty member giving the examination. 2. Fabrication: Any falsification or invention of data, citation, or other authority in an academic activity. 3. Plagiarism: Any passing off of another’s ideas, words, or work as one’s own. 4. Unauthorized Collaboration: Collaboration in any academic exercise unless the faculty member has stated that such collaboration is permitted. 5. Previously Submitted Work: Presenting work prepared for and submitted to another course (self-plagiarism). 6. Unauthorized Research: Failure to obtain approval of the Institutional Review Board for research involving human subjects. 7. Alteration or Misuse of Academic Documents: Any alteration or misuse of academic documents, including acts of forgery and/or furnishing false information. 8. Disruption of Academic Activity: Disruptive behavior, willful disobedience, profanity or vulgarity in a learning environment including but not limited to the classroom, practicum, and Internship sites. 9. Violations Defined by Faculty Member: Any other intentional violation of rules or policies established by a course faculty member/academic supervisor. 10. Assisting other students in acts of academic misconduct. Under certain exceptional circ*mstances involving serious violations listed above which pose a threat to the health and safety of the University community, disciplinary procedures administered by the campus senior administration may replace the procedures outlined below. These include circ*mstances in which a matter has been referred by the dean. In the case of a violent act, the faculty member or administrator immediately contacts the appropriate individual.

Infractions

The following acts are examples of infractions. Students found to have committed these acts are subject to sanctions described, as applicable, for infractions in the Sanctions. 1. Any unintentional act that, if it were intentional, would be a serious violation. 2. Any serious violation of the rules or policies established for a course or academic exercise.

Sanctions

For cases which find infractions or serious violations under Academic Code of Conduct, the following actions may be taken by the Director of Student Services or the Vice President/Academics: 1. Infractions of the Academic Code of Conduct a. Warning – A notification is placed in the student’s academic file indicating that an infraction of the Academic Code of Conduct occurred along any recommended or required remediation. 2. Serious Violations of the Academic Code of Conduct Actions in this section may be taken when the violation of the Academic Code of 92

Conduct is judged to be more serious than an infraction. Relevant disciplinary actions that may be taken include: a. Suspension from class for the remainder of the term in which case the student must re-take the course, pay the required tuition for the course when it is retaken and forfeit all tuition and fees paid for the course. b. Suspension from the University for a term or more with no transcript notation. Conditions for readmission will be specified when this sanction is imposed. c. Termination from the University with no transcript notation. d. Termination from the University with transcript notation indicating “Academic Misconduct Termination.”

Process and Procedures

Suspected instances and allegations of academic misconduct should be reported to the dean of the academic program. They will be reviewed and processed.

Educational Records

The record of the final determination in all cases will be maintained in the educational record of the student in the Registrar’s Office for a period of not less than five years after the student’s departure from the University. A request for removal of transcript notation of “Suspension Due to Student Conduct” may be submitted by the student to the office of the Vice President/Academics after three years. The decision of the dean with respect to such removal shall be final.

University Catalog

Students are responsible for becoming familiar with the information presented in this catalog and for knowing and observing all policies and procedures related to their participation in the University community. This responsibility includes, but is not limited to, academic requirements and general rules listed in this catalog. Regulations will not be waived nor exceptions granted based on a student’s lack of knowledge regarding Coleman University policies or procedures. Additional policies and procedures can be found in the student handbooks and in published school policies.

Catalog Controlling Graduation

Students must satisfy degree and course requirements as outlined in the catalog in effect at the time of first enrolling at the University as degree candidates, provided they do not interrupt their studies. Once students interrupt their program (i.e., without an approved leave of absence for one or more terms), it will be necessary to satisfy the degree requirements as outlined in the University catalog in effect at the time they re-enter as newly enrolling degree candidates, even if the changes in curriculum for that program are significant. Students may choose to graduate under the degree requirements from a more recent catalog than their matriculation catalog. Students choosing this option should note that taking such action may result in having to complete courses in addition to those listed as satisfying the degree outlined in the matriculation catalog It should also be noted that while students are required to satisfy degree and course requirements as outlined in their matriculation catalog, University policies and procedures may change on a yearly basis. Students are held to the policies and procedures outlined in the current catalog. Catalogs take effect on the first day of class for the Fall term of the academic year for which they are published.

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Registration

Students may only register for courses when they are officially admitted to the University. Students should register for all courses prior to the start of classes. Students will not receive credit for any course in which they are not officially registered. Students may not attend any class in which they are not officially enrolled.

Registration Procedure

Students must make an appointment with an academic advisor for course scheduling and registration.

Course Loads

At the undergraduate level, students must be enrolled in a minimum of 12 units to have fulltime status for any term. At the graduate level, students must be enrolled in 5 units to have fulltime status for any term. Students who attempt less than the minimum load risk a delay in the completion of their degree requirements. To be considered for an increase in course load in excess of 12 units, students must have a good attendance record as determined by the Vice President/Academics and the Student Services Department, have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.8, and have no history of withdrawing from classes. A committee comprised of Academics, Student Services, Financial Aid, and an officer of the University must document any exceptions. For additional information on course loads and how they impact financial aid, please see the Expenses and Financial Aid section of the catalog.

Dropping and Adding Courses

The add/drop period for each term is during the first 1-2 weeks of the term. Students who wish to drop courses from their schedules must see their academic advisor. International students with visa status must confer with the International Student Services Advisor before dropping courses. Domestic students with financial aid should confer with the Financial Aid Office before dropping courses. If a student stops attending a course without going through the official drop procedure, a grade of F, Withdrawal, or No Credit (as relevant) will be entered on the student’s permanent record, and the student may not be eligible for any refund on tuition and fees. Students who wish to drop all courses in which they are enrolled for a term must follow the withdrawal procedures described in the Withdrawal from All Classes section. Students who drop a course or withdraw from a course after the add/drop period may be entitled to a refund per the refund policies located in the Expenses and Financial Aid section.

Withdrawal from All Classes

For students approved to withdraw from all classes after the add/drop period, a grade of W for each course will be entered on the student’s permanent record. Clearance from Financial Aid must be obtained prior to withdrawal. To withdraw in good standing, students must meet all obligations to the University. Students withdrawing completely from all classes should schedule an appointment with their academic advisor. Students who stop attending the Institution, and do not meet with their Academic Advisor, will be Administratively Withdrawn from the University. In these cases, “Withdrawn” will be noted on the official transcript. 94

Cancellation of Registration

The University reserves the right to cancel the registration of any student who does not comply with Coleman University rules, regulations, or policies, including the nonpayment of tuition fees.

Cancellation of a Course

The University makes every reasonable effort to offer courses as announced. However, the University reserves the right to modify the class schedule or to cancel courses if necessary.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy Satisfactory Academic and Financial Aid Progress

Satisfactory academic progress is required of all students and is necessary in order to maintain eligibility for federal financial aid programs. The two components of satisfactory academic progress are the qualitative component (cumulative grade point average) and the quantitative component (earned credits divided by attempted credits or incremental completion rate.) A student’s progress will be evaluated at the end of each term or payment period to determine satisfactory academic progress. A student who does not meet the standards of satisfactory academic progress at any given evaluation point will be notified and placed on either probation, including financial aid probation, or be dismissed as a regular student.

Academic Year

Federal regulations require Coleman University to establish an academic year that meets the minimum requirements: 30 weeks and a minimum number of quarter credit hours. Listed are the definitions of each program’s academic year. • Master’s degree Programs – 30 weeks and 30 quarter credits • Bachelor’s Degree Programs – 30 weeks and 36 quarter credits • Associate Degree Programs – 30 weeks and 36 quarter credits Enrollment Status For undergraduate programs, Coleman University defines full-time status as 12-quarter credit hours of regularly scheduled instruction or examination per 10-week quarter. Half-time enrollment is defined as one half of the full-time status. For graduate level programs, Coleman University defines full-time enrollment status as 10 credit hours of regularly scheduled instruction or examination per 10-week quarter. Half-time enrollment is defined as one half of the full-time status.

Maximum Time Frame

A student must complete all coursework in no more than 1.5 times the normal program length as measured by the credit hours required for completion of the program. This 1.5 times the normal program length is referred to as the maximum time frame. For example, if a student is in a 96 credit hour associate’s degree program, he/she must complete the program in no more than 144 attempted credit hours. Students who do not meet this requirement, may be dismissed from the University.

Required Minimum Academic Achievement

In order to be considered to be making satisfactory academic progress, a student must have earned the following cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and incremental completion rate (ICR) at the following evaluation points.

Undergraduate Programs

Required evaluation point minimum CGPA and minimum ICR: (Based on 10 week terms) CGPA 95

ICR

• • • •

0 – 12 credits 13 – 24 credits 25 – 36 credits 37+ credits

2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00

50% 50% 60% 66.67%

Graduate Programs

Required evaluation point minimum CGPA and Minimum ICR: (Based on 5 week terms) • • •

CGPA 3.00 3.00 3.00

0 – 5 credits 6 – 10 credits 11+ credits

ICR 50% 50% 66.67%

Effect of Attendance on Satisfactory Academic Progress

A student is expected to maintain good attendance and follow the established attendance policy. In the event a student fails to maintain the required attendance standard in any course, he/she will be withdrawn from the course.

Effect of grades on Satisfactory Academic Progress

Courses with grades of “F”, “I”, “W”, “NC” are not counted as credits successfully completed, but are counted as credits attempted and will therefore effect the IRC. Grades of “WV”, “W”, “I”, “TR”, “CR”, “NC”, “AU” are not used in the calculation of CGPA.

Effect of Credit for Previous Training on Satisfactory Academic Progress

Credit for previous training (transfer & waived credits) will be counted as both completed and attempted credits when calculating the ICR and for determining the maximum time frame. However, the credits will not count in the CGPA. A student who seeks an additional credential may have applicable units from a previous program transferred into the new program based on the new program’s requirements. Units transferred from a previous program will be treated as transfer units.

Effect of Earning an Additional Credential

A student who completes a program at Coleman University and enrolls in an additional program at Coleman University may have the ability to transfer units from the previously completed program into the new enrolled program upon evaluation. All transferred coursework will be counted when calculating ICR and for determining the maximum time frame.

Effect of Repeating a Course on Satisfactory Academic Progress

A student may repeat any course in which he/she has received a grade of “F” or “W.” The new grade will replace the original grade for the purpose of calculating the CGPA. However, both courses will be considered credits attempted for the purpose of determining ICR. Effect of Program Changes on Satisfactory Academic Progress A student who changes program must submit a written request for a program change to the Student Services Department. The Student Services Department will complete an evaluation indicating which courses have been completed and which, if any, count toward the graduation requirements of the new program. The student will be required to sign a new enrollment agreement. All coursework that applies to the new program will be used in the calculation of satisfactory academic progress, including both the CGPA and ICR. If there are no relevant courses applied to the new program, the student will begin the new curriculum with a new normal program length, maximum time frame, and ICR. The CGPA will continue from the old program. 96

Appeals

A student, who wishes to appeal determination that he/she is not making satisfactory academic progress due to mitigating circ*mstances, may submit a written appeal to the Director of Student Services for review. The written appeal should include a detailed explanation and documentation of the following: • Current academic status of the student • Mitigating circ*mstances that led to the student’s current academic status. • How the student’s situation has changed • The student’s plan for achieving required minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress The Director of Student Services is responsible for determining the appropriateness of the mitigating circ*mstances in regards to severity, timeliness and the student’s ability to avoid the circ*mstances. The result of the appeal (granted or denied) will be provided to the student and documented in the student’s academic file. If the student’s appeal is granted, he/she will be placed on financial aid probation and eligibility for financial aid will be reinstated for one (1) additional term.

Financial Aid Probation

A student on financial aid probation may receive financial aid despite the determination that he/she did not maintain satisfactory academic progress. However, if it is determined that the student will not make satisfactory academic progress by the end of the term in which he/she is on probation, a written academic plan must be developed by the Student Services Department and signed by the student. The plan is designed to ensure that the student will be able to meet the standards of satisfactory academic progress by a specified point in time. As part of the academic plan, the Student Services advisor may require the student to repeat some or all or the courses in which the student previously received a grade of “D,” “F,” or “W” before attempting any other courses in the student’s program of study. In order for the student to qualify for further financial aid, he/she must meet the required CGPA and ICR standards by the end of the term in which he/she is on probation or be successful in following the academic plan. If the requirements are not met, the student will be dismissed from the program of study.

Mitigating Circ*mstances

Mitigating circ*mstances may include poor health, death in the family or other significant occurrences outside the control of the student. These circ*mstances must be documented by the student to demonstrate that they had an adverse impact on the student’s academic performance. The student is responsible for providing any requested written verification of mitigating circ*mstances.

Academic Calendar

Undergraduate: The academic year is divided into 5 terms that are 10 weeks in length. Academic credit is given in quarter units. Graduate: The academic year is divided into 10 terms that are 5 weeks in length. Academic credit is given in quarter units.

Term Organization/Unit of Credit

The University operates on the quarter system. A quarter consists of 10 weeks. For graduate students, the courses are divided into accelerated five-week modules. One-quarter unit of credit equals, at a minimum, 10 classroom hours of lecture, or 20 hours of laboratory. 97

Attendance On-Campus

Students are expected to be punctual and to attend every class session. Absences are recorded on the student’s Master record. A student’s success in his or her academic work is directly related to class attendance. A student who is late to class by 30 minutes or more or leaves 30 minutes before class ends will be recorded as absent. A student who has missed 30% or more of any scheduled course sessions may be subject to suspension and to being assigned a fail (“F”). The student must report to the VP of Academics to request reinstatement. The student is responsible for the tuition for the course. If a student is going to be late or absent from class, the student should contact a member of the Student Services Department and his/her instructor. Any student who is having difficulty maintaining regular attendance should also contact the Student Services Department or his/her associate dean for assistance. Extenuating circ*mstances will be considered. The student may be required to present confirmation of such circ*mstances. Extenuating circ*mstances include, but are not limited to, the following: • Personal illness, confirmed by a physician. • Illness or death in the immediate family (immediate family includes spouse, parents, grandparents, siblings, and children). • Active duty military service, including active duty for training. Failure to maintain continuous attendance can result in ineligibility for financial aid. Students may be removed from a course based on the following absence guidelines: • 4 Unit Course—Allowed 2 absences per 10-week term (3rd absence may be excused by Vice President/Academics & Director of Student Services) • 5 Unit Course—Allowed 2 absences per 5-week term (3rd absence may be excused by Vice President/Academics & Director of Student Services) • 8 Unit Course—Allowed 5 absences per 10-week term (6th absence may be excused by Vice President/Academics & Director of Student Services)

Online Participation and Attendance Policy

An important part of the learning process involves applying the knowledge gained from lectures and printed and electronic materials in real-world activities. The University is dedicated to ensuring that all students are given ample opportunities to demonstrate their mastery of subject matter through projects and assignments in every class taken. Succeeding in distance education courses requires a high degree of motivation and participation. Students are expected to participate in all class activities and assignments, as detailed in the syllabus and in the online course materials in each class taken. As in campus-based courses, attendance is recorded every week. A student is considered to have attended a distance education class if he or she logs into the class during the week in question. The University policy on absences is strictly enforced in online classes. Any student absent for more than two weeks is subject to immediate removal from the class in question. Any student who fails to participate in required class assignments for three weeks may be dropped and/or removed from the class at the discretion of the class instructor, the Director of Student Services, or the Vice President/Academics. Any student who is having difficulty maintaining regular participation in assigned coursework should contact his or her instructor, the Student Services Department, or the Vice 98

President/Academics for assistance. Extenuating circ*mstances will be considered, but evidence proving the circ*mstances should be provided to the University. Extenuating circ*mstances include, but are not limited to, the following conditions: • Personal illness, confirmed by a physician. • Illness or death in the immediate family (immediate family includes spouse, parents, grandparents, siblings, and children). • Active duty military service, including active duty for training. All distance education coursework offered at Coleman University is evaluated within ten business days of submission. Coursework includes lesson activities, quizzes, exams, final projects, and theses.

Classroom Expectations/Conduct

Classrooms and labs are spaces designed for learning and engagement. Students and faculty should interact with one another in a manner that encourages and facilitates active engagement, collaboration, transfer of knowledge, and the practice of skills in order to maintain an environment that inspires learning. Behavior that is not related to student learning or instructor presentation is to remain outside of the classroom. Examples of actions that fall into this category include but are not limited to eating food, mobile device use, or using electronic cigarettes. Such actions distract from the purpose of the classroom environment, which is teaching and learning. Students are expected to restrict such activities to break periods outside of the classroom. Faculty members are expected to enforce this policy.

Technology Requirements and Responsibilities

Students must have access to high-speed-Internet-connected computers that are able to create, send, and receive documents in Microsoft Office-compatible formats. Students are responsible for backing up their coursework and keeping their systems current. Technical difficulties are not an automatic reason for extended deadlines. Students should plan ahead and complete work early to avoid last-minute crises situations caused by equipment failure.

Academic Status Full-Time Status

Undergraduate students must be enrolled in 12 units to have full-time status for any term. A petition is required to take more than 12 units during any term. Graduate students must be enrolled 5 units to have full-time status for any term. To be considered for an increase in course load beyond 12 units (undergraduate) or 5 units (graduate), students must have a good attendance record as determined by Student Services and the Vice President/Academics, have a GPA of at least 3.8, and no history of withdrawing from classes. A committee comprised of Academics, Student Services, Financial Aid, and an officer of the University must document any exceptions.

Half-Time Status

Undergraduate students who are enrolled in 8 units or less are considered to be enrolled at halftime status. Graduate students are not permitted to be enrolled at half-time status for a 5-week term.

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Class Levels Undergraduate

Grade Level I: 0-45 units completed Grade Level II: 46-90 units completed Grade Level III: 91-135 units completed Grade Level IV: 136 or more units completed

Graduate

Master’s Students:

Those who have completed a baccalaureate degree (or its equivalent) and who have been admitted to the University to work toward a master’s degree

Academic Advising

Coleman University is committed to providing helpful and informed advising to all students in all programs. Academic advisors from the Student Services Department are available to consult with students on issues of performance, policies, regulations, rules and curriculum requirements. Depending on the specific issues, students may obtain advice from academic advisors, deans, and advisors for students with special needs, such as international students and students with disabilities.

Residency Requirements Associate Degree Programs

Students in associate degree programs with 96 units must complete 64 units in residence at Coleman University. Students in associate degree programs with 108 units must complete 72 units in residence at Coleman University.

Bachelor Degree Programs

Students in bachelor degree programs with 180 units must complete 92 units in residence at Coleman University.

Graduate Degree Programs

Students in graduate degree programs with 65 units must complete 50 units in residence at Coleman University. Special residency requirements may be imposed by individual colleges or programs. Students should confer with their academic advisor or Dean (or equivalent).

Registration and Registration Limits

Coleman University offers registration by appointment for all students. Students must schedule an appointment with their assigned academic advisor. Students may add or drop courses during the add/drop periods of each term by meeting with their advisor. It is the responsibility of the student to check with the Financial Aid office to be sure that any changes in total units after adds and/or drops does not affect eligibility for financial aid or the amount of financial aid received. Some programs set limits on the number of units in which students may enroll during one term.

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Auditing Courses

Any student who audits a course is not required to pay tuition for the course, but the student is responsible for any fees associated with the course for items such as materials and supplies. The auditing student is not required to fulfill any class assignments or to take any examinations. The auditing student receives no college credit for such courses and receives no grade. Therefore, the auditing of courses does not apply toward the fulfillment of degree requirements. No change from audit to credit status, or from credit to audit status, may be made after the beginning of the class. Students wishing to audit a course should speak with their academic advisor to determine whether the course can be audited. Courses that are audited do not count towards determination of academic status (half/full-time), but they must be approved by an academic advisor before registration can occur.

Repeated Courses

Students may repeat courses in order to improve their academic record. Courses must be repeated at Coleman University, at the student’s expense, and cannot be taken at another institution. All grades earned at Coleman University will remain on the student’s transcript and the higher grade earned when students repeat a course will be used to compute the grade point average. The record for any repeated course will show the original grade accompanied by a notation signifying that the repeated course is shown elsewhere on the transcript. In all instances, the same structured class must be completed. Courses must be repeated at Coleman and not taken at another institution. There is no maximum of courses that may be repeated. No course may be taken more than twice (the original registration and one subsequent registration) without approval from the Director of Student Services.

Grades

An undergraduate student must earn a grade of 60% or above in each course to be considered passing. A minimum cumulative grade point average of “C” (2.0) in all courses taken at Coleman University for which a grade of A, B, C, D, or F was assigned is required for graduation. Students in the graduate program are expected to maintain a high level of performance. A grade point average of 3.0 is required for graduation. A student who earns less than a 3.0 in the first course attempted will be counseled to determine the advisability of continuing in the program.

Grading Structure

The following table lists the Coleman University grading structure. All grades listed will count as units attempted. For each unit in which the student is enrolled, he or she will receive quality points as follows: Letter Grade A AB+ B BC+

Percentage 94% - 100% 90% - 93% 87% - 89% 84% - 86% 80% - 83% 77% - 79%

Grade Points 4.00 3.67 3.33 3.00 2.67 2.33 101

C 74% - 76% 2.00 C70% - 73% 1.67 D+ 67% - 69% 1.33 D 64% - 66% 1.00 D60% - 63% 0.67 F 0% - 59% 0.00 I N/A 0.00 W N/A 0.00 CR 70% or above 0.00 NC 69% or below 0.00 AU N/A 0.00 TR N/A 0.00 WV N/A 0.00 Note: I = Incomplete, W = Withdraw, CR = Credit, NC = No Credit, AU= Audit, TR= Transfer, WV= Course Waiver A student’s grade point average is obtained by dividing the total number of quality points earned by the total number of units undertaken, excluding foundational courses and courses in which the grades CR, INC, NC, and W. Transfer units are not counted in calculating the GPA on the Coleman University transcript. All Coleman University credits counted toward a degree are used in calculating the cumulative GPA.

Marking System and Symbols Used on Transcripts

The following list of grade descriptions is a general overview. In some cases, graduate program standards may be more stringent than the general University standards. A

Superior. The student has demonstrated a quality of work and accomplishment far beyond the formal requirements and shows originality of thought and mastery of material. A+ grades are not recognized as a valid grade in grade point average calculations and are not recorded on the student’s transcript.

B

Above Average. The student’s achievement exceeds the usual accomplishment, showing a clear indication of initiative and grasp of the subject.

C

Average. The student has met the formal requirements and has demonstrated good comprehension of the subject and reasonable ability to handle ideas.

D

Below Average. The student’s accomplishment (while still passing) leaves much to be desired.

F

Failure. The student has not met the minimum requirements.

CR

Credit. Used upon completion of thesis, internship and for other specified courses.

NC

No Credit. The student has not achieved the minimum expectations of scholarship or credit in terms of the course objectives. The NC is not to be used in situations in which a grade of F is justified. It is not used in computing grade point averages.

I

Incomplete. Given only in extenuating circ*mstances. Work must be completed by 5 weeks from the end of the current term.

W

Withdrawal. Grade given to those who drop classes after the scheduled drop period. 102

AU

Audit. The student has selected to audit the course and receives no credit for the course.

TR

Transfer. Used to identify courses accepted for transfer toward degree completion

WV

Course Waiver. Used to identify courses that have been approved for waiver.

Faculty members may use pluses and minuses when grades fall between two categories. Note: A plus may not be used with a grade of A.

Incomplete Course Work

Students who are currently enrolled and have attended class for at least 70% of the term and are doing passing work, may request an incomplete grade if they are unable to complete the term for nonacademic reasons beyond their control. To do so, students must obtain a “Request for Incomplete Grade” from the Student Services Office. They must then meet with the course instructor or dean, who will specify the remaining requirements and the time frame for completion. The maximum extension is five weeks from the end of the current term. The instructor and the student must sign the forms, and the student must return the completed form to the Director of Student Services. Time spent resolving an Incomplete does not qualify a student for financial aid or constitute official enrollment in the University. It is the responsibility of the student to work with the course instructor to complete all required coursework by the established deadline in order to receive a grade for the course. If a grade change has not been filed by the specified date, a failing grade will be recorded.

Noncredit and Remedial Courses

Noncredit and remedial courses are considered part of a student’s course load but do not count for units completed toward degree completion. Instructors report a grade for credit when all requirements for the course have been completed. The Registrar must receive grades from instructors on the last day of a scheduled term. If grades are not received by the registrar, an NR (No Report) will be entered on the student’s transcript until the final grade is received. Students who receive NR for their grade should contact their instructor. After a grade has been reported to the University’s Registrar, the grade will not be changed unless a written grade change and an acceptable reason for the change are submitted to the Registrar by the course instructor with prior approval of the dean (or equivalent).

Review of Students’ Performance

Student Services has a procedure for regularly reviewing the overall performance of students, including whether the minimal grade point average has been met. The department may also perform an annual evaluation of all students. Academic Advisors are responsible for monitoring academic performance and for working with students whose performance needs special review. Review may lead to recommended remediation programs, probation, or dismissal from the program. For more information on the procedures used by the University, contact your academic advisor.

Grade Appeals

Faculty members are vested with the authority to evaluate student standards of performance and assign corresponding grades. It is the responsibility of faculty to apply these standards and 103

grading criteria uniformly. Final course grades submitted by faculty to the Registrar’s Office are presumed accurate and are considered final. Students can appeal a grade only when they can document and prove that any of the following has occurred: • An error in calculating the grade. • Assignment of a grade based on reasons other than the announced criteria and standards, or based on factors other than student achievement. • Inconsistent or inequitably applied standards for evaluation of student academic performance. If a student believes he or she has grounds for appealing a grade issued by an instructor because of an occurrence of one or more of the above-mentioned circ*mstances, the student must submit a personal statement, supported by appropriate evidence, to the grievance committee within 14 days of the posting of the grade. The student must provide written evidence demonstrating the occurrence of one or more of the above-listed grounds for appeal, along with evidence of the student’s level of achievement in support of the particular grade that the student believes he or she should have been awarded. If the evidence meets the criteria, the Vice President/Academics will forward the student’s written statement to the associate dean and instructor for a response, which the instructor must provide within 15 days. The associate dean will then refer all documentation to the Vice President/Academics for review. The Vice President/Academics will then decide if the documentation supports the allegation. If so, the Vice President/Academics will convene a grade appeals committee to review the documentation. The grade appeals committee consists of the Vice President/Academics, the associate dean, and another instructor in the discipline at issue. If necessary, another official of the University may be substituted. A final decision will be rendered at the meeting and forwarded to the student within 15 days. The decision of the grade appeals committee is final and cannot be appealed.

Honors

Dean’s List

Students who have completed at least 36 units at Coleman University and have perfect attendance will be included on the Dean’s List.

President’s List

Students who have earned a cumulative GPA of 3.8 or higher for at least 36 units of credit at Coleman University will be placed on the President’s List. The President’s list is published at the end of each 10 week quarter. The diploma for graduates whose GPA is 3.8 or higher will bear an honors designation according to the following criteria: Cum Laude 3.800-3.899 cumulative GPA Magna Cum Laude 3.900-3.99 cumulative GPA Summa Cum Laude 4.00 cumulative GPA

Transcripts

Coleman University does not release transcripts or any other information concerning a student’s record without signed authorization from the student. Transcripts or any other services will not be provided to students who have a delinquent financial obligation to the University. These services will also be withheld from any students who are delinquent in repayment of the Self Loan. 104

Student records will be maintained at the school site for five years from the last date of attendance. Transcripts are maintained permanently.

Permanent Record

Only information of an academic nature is entered into the Transcript. Statements regarding disciplinary action may be entered in cases in which specific entry is part of a sanction. The transcript bears the following entries regarding the completion of degree requirements and the awarding of degrees: degree awarded; area of concentration or major (as applicable); and date of completion, i.e., the last day of the last term registered or the date on which all requirements for the degree were completed (whichever is the later date).

Official Records

Official transcripts can be ordered by submitting a Transcript Request Form to the University at 8888 Balboa Avenue, San Diego, CA 92123-1506. Release of transcripts requires the student’s signature. The Registrar’s Office processes all requests for certified copies of Coleman University transcripts and verification of student status. Five business days should normally be allowed for processing. A Transcript Request with the student’s signature must be submitted. A $15 fee is charged for each official transcript. Additional fees may apply. Transcripts will not be released to students with holds on their student account. Students may make requests in writing for unofficial photocopies of the Coleman University transcripts in their file. Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, transcripts may be withheld if the student has an unresolved obligation to the University including an unresolved disciplinary action. Official transcripts bear the institutional seal and the signature of the University Registrar. Once an official college transcript from another institution is received by Coleman University, it becomes part of the student’s permanent record. Copies of such transcripts will not be released to a third party. Coleman University cannot officially verify any coursework taken at another institution even if the student has a transcript on file from that institution.

Changes to Records/Names Used on Records

It is the student’s responsibility to keep the University apprised of all name and address changes. Students wishing to make changes in their name, address, telephone number, or email address information should submit the appropriate form to the Registrar’s Office. The student’s legal name must be used on all University records, diplomas and other records. The Registrar may require appropriate documentation in order to change an official record at the University. Examples of documentation for name or address changes may include, but are not limited to, the following: a valid driver’s license, social security card or passport for a name change and a driver’s license, passport, or copies of current bills for an address change. In most cases, Coleman University can accommodate name changes in the University database for alumni upon submission of an approved name change form, and supporting documentation of a legal name change. However, archived hard-copy documents pertaining to the student will remain under the original name under which the student attended. Students wishing to receive a reprinted diploma under the new name must submit a request form and pay applicable printing fees. The reprinted diploma will include a comment indicating it is a reissue/replacement diploma that was originally issued under a different name.

Privacy and Access to Records

The University complies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), as amended, and its implementing regulations issued, which provide students with safeguards for 105

the accuracy, completeness and privacy of their educational records. Annual notice is given to students summarizing their rights under this law.

Change of Degree Program

A student who wishes to change degree programs must re-apply to the new area of study. A transfer credit evaluation will be conducted based on the curriculum of the new area of study. A new application and application fee do not apply in this case. A student wishing to make such a change should meet with his/her academic advisor.

Changes in Degree Requirements

If a degree requirement has been changed after initial enrollment, bachelor degree candidates who have been in continuous attendance may elect to fulfill the new requirements rather than those in effect at the time of initial enrollment. Students should note that this may result in taking additional courses to meet the new degree requirements. When a change in a program becomes effective, it may apply to students who are currently in that program, as well as to prospective students. It is the student’s responsibility to remain informed of current requirements throughout his or her college career. Students who drop and re-enroll are subject to the requirements of the catalog in effect at the time of re-enrollment.

Grade Levels for Undergraduates

Undergraduate students are classified according to the number of units completed, as follows: Status

Units Completed

Grade Level I (freshman)

0-45 quarter hours

Grade Level II (sophom*ore)

46-90 quarter hours

Grade Level III (junior)

91-135 quarter hours

Grade Level IV (senior)

136 or more quarter hours

Program Length

Students must complete their educational program within a reasonable period of time. A student’s maximum time frame for completion of the educational program varies by the specific degree sought. Financial aid eligibility is limited to the maximum time frame allowed for each degree program the University offers. Students who do not complete the program successfully within the specified time must reapply for admission. In some cases, graduate program standards may be more stringent than the general University standards. Please check with your academic advisor for more specific information on program standards. Associate’s degree if student is enrolled full-time with no breaks in enrollment; programs are normally completed in 2-3 years, except for transfer students. Bachelor’s degree if student is enrolled full-time with no breaks in enrollment; programs are normally completed in 3-4 years, except for transfer students. Master’s degree if student is enrolled full-time with no breaks in enrollment; programs are normally completed in 1-2 years, except for transfer students. 106

Graduation

Application for Graduation

All graduating students must complete a formal Application for Graduation prior to completing their last term and no later than 60 days prior to the scheduled graduation date listed on the Academic Calendar. Applications for graduation are obtained from Student Services. Degrees are conferred upon completion of all academic requirements. Completion of academic requirements for a degree is termed graduation. The ceremony celebrating this achievement is commencement. The commencement ceremonies are held twice a year. In order to receive diplomas, students must clear their accounts with the Student Business Office.

Conferment of Degree

The degree date (or “award date”) is the date the student completed the last degree requirement. This is the date specified on the student’s transcript as having earned the degree. The diploma date is always the end of term date in which the student completed requirements. Students who complete degree requirements after the end of one term but during the course of a subsequent term will be given a diploma date reflecting the end of the subsequent term.

Degree Completion Verification

Only the Registrar’s Office is authorized to issue confirmation documentation attesting to the matters pertaining to a student’s academic work at the University. All degrees will be posted to the permanent record transcript at the end of the term in which the degree requirements are completed. Requirements are considered complete when relevant documents are received by the Registrar.

Policy on Required Units and Completion of Degrees

Students must complete the total number of units required by their degree programs as specified in the programs’ curricula in the university catalog in the year of their entry. Students are permitted to transfer units into their program under the guidelines of transfer policies at the university, school, and program level. These transferred units are generally designated as contributing to the total number of units required. Decisions regarding the transfer of courses into the program are made by the program dean and the Registrar’s Office and will appear on the students’ transcripts as transfer units.

Leave of Absence

Coleman University understands that students may have career or family commitments that can occasionally make class attendance impossible. A student who requires a leave of absence must contact Student Services. Due to the nature of the schedule of classes, a leave of absence may cause a future break in a student’s studies and cause the graduation date to be postponed longer than the length of the original leave of absence. Students may request a leave of absence in an emergency situation only. An emergency situation is defined as a personal or family illness or military duty. Doctor’s notes and excuses from doctors outside of the United States will not be accepted as valid documentation to support an official leave of absence. A leave of absence may not exceed 180 days.

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A leave of absence is normally not granted in the first module of a program. Students who feel as though they cannot complete the first module due to the circ*mstances listed above must speak with the Director of Student Services or the Vice President/Academics. Any other break in attendance (that does not meet the above criteria) will be considered a withdrawal with intent to return. The student’s file is processed through the Financial Aid Department as a withdrawal and the student will be subject to the current tuition rate upon reenrolling. The student must also re-apply for any financial aid that was returned to lenders based upon the last date of attendance. To request a leave of absence or a withdrawal, the student must apply in writing to the Student Services Department. Students who do not return from a leave of absence or a withdrawal as scheduled will be considered to have withdrawn from the University. Students who have excessive absences and have not filed a written request for a leave of absence or students whose leave of absence requests have not been granted will be considered to have withdrawn. Students who do not maintain continuous attendance are subject to current tuition rates at the time they re-enter. Students are not penalized for scheduled University breaks. Students who take a leave of absence or withdrawal before completion of a course, are considered to have withdrawn from that course and must completely retake the class upon return. Past coursework in the withdrawn course will not be accepted in the retaken class.

Withdrawal

Students may withdraw in good standing from any course or from their entire academic program at any time. To withdraw from the academic program, a student should submit the official withdrawal form to Student Services prior to the deadline. Students wishing to withdraw from their entire academic program must obtain the approval of the appropriate University personnel in order to withdraw in good standing. Students who have withdrawn from the program and wish to re-enter must reapply through regular application procedures. Admission is not guaranteed for re-applicants. Financial aid recipients who withdraw from Coleman University during a term may be required to repay a proportional amount of the aid awarded. (See Financial Aid Refunds.)

Grades Received for Withdrawn Courses

Grades are assigned and tuition is refunded according to date within a session in which students withdraw from the course as detailed in the tables below. Classes cannot be added after the first session of the term unless the instructor gives approval.

Undergraduate Students Week In Term 0 1 2 3 4 5 6

Grade Received When Withdrawing from Course No Grade No Grade W W W W W 108

7 8 9 10

F F F F

Graduate Students Sessions Attended

Grade Received When Withdrawing from Course

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

No Grade No Grade W W W W W F F F F

Transfer Credits/Credit for Previous Coursework

A limited number of undergraduate transfer credits may be accepted from accredited institutions if the grade earned is C or higher. Academic work acceptable for transfer credits must be appropriate to the degree program to be pursued at Coleman University and approved by the dean or designee. A limited number of graduate transfer credits may be accepted from accredited institutions if the grade earned is B or higher. Graduate academic work acceptable for transfer credits must be appropriate to the degree program to be pursued at Coleman University and approved by the dean or designee. Official transcripts are required for completion of a transfer credit evaluation. Course descriptions and syllabi may also be required for evaluation, per the request of the Registrar.

Transfer Credit into an Associate’s or Bachelor’s Program

College credits for courses in which an applicant has received a grade of “C” or better at accredited institutions are transferable provided that (1) the courses are substantially equivalent in content and length to the courses offered at Coleman University; and (2) the courses fit appropriately into the student’s curriculum at Coleman University. Coleman University does not grant academic credit for life experience, nor does it accept in transfer credit for life experience granted by another institution. Coleman University does accept credit earned through challenge examinations. An applicant who has had previous college training must request that an official transcript be sent to Coleman University by the institution(s) previously attended. All college transcripts received by the University will be evaluated for transferability of course credits and the student will be given a copy of that evaluation. Students who wish to transfer units into a program must provide the University with official transcripts from previously attended institutions within 60 days of the start of a program. Tuition costs will not be reduced unless these transcripts are received, verified, and evaluated for transferrable coursework by the University. Additionally, 109

students should provide a course description for courses he/she seeks transfer credit for. Failure to follow procedure in submitting required documents for transfer credit may result in the student being enrolled and paying for courses he or she wished to be evaluated for transfer credit. Completed military service schools may be evaluated based on the recommendations of the American Council on Education (ACE) when official credentials are properly presented. Credit may be granted for courses that are equivalent to those offered by the University. Recommendations by ACE are not binding upon the University. Notice to all veterans: students who are Title 38 beneficiaries must submit copies of all prior college and military training records for evaluation. Once the transfer credit evaluation is complete, the student will be sent a copy of that evaluation. The grades and grade point average earned at another institution are not transferable. Only the grades earned at Coleman University are computed in the GPA. The units transferred from previous institutions are included in the computation of the maximum time allowable to complete degree requirements. Regardless of how many credits are accepted, a transfer student must earn the required residency units at Coleman University to be eligible for a degree. Counseling is available through Student Services to each student concerning his or her academic record, the acceptance of credit by transfer, and measures for meeting the course requirements for a degree.

Transfer Credit into a Master’s Program

Graduate coursework taken from an accredited institution can be considered for transfer credit. The number of transfer credit(s) to be considered and the materials required to support petitions for transfer credit of previous graduate coursework will be specified for each program. In order for a course to be accepted in transfer, the student must provide evidence that the course is substantially comparable in content and length to the equivalent course at Coleman University. The minimum grade acceptable is 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. Course work completed at another graduate program at Coleman University will receive direct transfer credit, so long as the course description from the completed class matches a course description in the graduate program to which the prospective student is applying. The University will accept fifteen units of graduate course work completed at another college or university, provided that the coursework is substantially equivalent in content and length to that offered at Coleman University, dependent upon verification by the Registrar. Course work completed more than ten years before matriculation may not be acceptable for transfer. All transfer credit is subject to review by the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies, the Vice President/Academics, and the Registrar. Coleman University does not grant academic credit for life experience, nor does it accept in transfer credit for life experience granted by another institution. Coleman University does accept credit earned through challenge examinations.

Notice Concerning Transferability of Credits and Credentials Earned at Coleman University:

The transferability of credits you earn at Coleman University is at the complete discretion of an institution to which you may seek to transfer. Acceptance of the degree you earn in your program is also at the complete discretion of the institution to which you may seek to transfer. If the credits or degree that you earn at this institution are not accepted at the institution to which you seek to transfer, you may be required to repeat some or all of your coursework at that institution. For this reason you should make certain that your attendance at this institution will 110

meet your educational goals. This may include contacting an institution to which you may seek to transfer after attending Coleman University to determine if your credits or degree will transfer. Coleman University has not entered into any transfer or articulation agreements with any other college or university.

Transfer Credit Maximums

The maximum number of credits from other institutions that can be transferred to Coleman University programs are: Associate’s Degree (96 units) 32 units Associate’s Degree (108 units) 36 units Bachelor’s Degree 88 units Master’s Degree 15 units The University reserves the right to require students to take a challenge examination to establish competency with regard to courses accepted in transfer toward any program.

Credit Age Limitation When a degree is issued, the University proclaims to society that the student possesses the knowledge and skills that are required by the chosen discipline. Therefore, there are limitations imposed on the age of credits in the major. Courses in the major that were completed ten (10) or more years earlier may be accepted at the discretion of the University, but all courses currently required for the major must be completed and the residency requirement met. There is no limitation on the age of credits earned in social sciences and humanities. English and mathematics courses completed more than ten (10) years before matriculation are not eligible for transfer.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

The University cooperates with the College Level Examination Program of the College Board. Students may be awarded up to eight units of credit for each of the Examinations for a score of 50 or above. A score of 52 on the 2003 scale (or 520 on any exams administered on scales from 1986 through 2002) is required in the English Composition (essay version) examination. A maximum of 36 units may be granted for extra-institutional learning. Duplicate credit in the same subject is not awarded in any case. Students should speak with his or her Academic Advisor before registering for any of the CLEP or DSST examinations. Students can register for CLEP and DSST exams by visiting Coleman University’s Test Center.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

The GPA is computed by multiplying the value of the letter grade by the number of units for the course. The sum of the grade points earned for all courses is divided by the number of units attempted for which a grade of A, B, C, D, or F was assigned.

Waiving Classes/Challenge by Examination

Students who feel they have a background in a particular field equivalent to that covered in a required Coleman University course may challenge that course, provided the course is acknowledged by the school as being eligible for challenge. The student pays the appropriate challenge exam fee, sits for the examination, and, if successful in passing the exam, is given 111

Comment [BL1]: Should this really be 10 year for a course in major?

credit for the course. Students on academic probation cannot challenge a course by examination unless such challenge is specifically allowed in their probation agreement. Students should consult the appropriate program dean to learn which courses are available for waiver or challenge, and for the limits on waivers and challenges; usually there is a specified list of courses that may be challenged or waived.

Guidelines

A student who wishes to challenge a course must submit a request to the Vice President/Academics. Students should justify the reasons as to why they feel they have the ability to pass the course. The following guidelines must be adhered to: • Regardless of how many credits may be earned through challenge, a student must earn the required residence units at Coleman University to be eligible for a degree. • Students who are approved to challenge a course will do so under pass/no pass conditions. • Normal tuition will accrue for challenged courses. • Students must achieve a score of 70% on the midterm and final for that course and may also need to complete any assigned projects.

Transfer Credit Evaluations or Course Requirements Appeals

A student who wishes to appeal a decision regarding transfer credit or who wishes to appeal for a waiver of any degree requirement should submit a written appeal to the Director of Student Services. A committee comprised of the Director of Student Services, the Vice President/Academics, and the Registrar will consider the appeal.

Internal Transfers/Transferring Programs

A student who elects to transfer from one program to another before any grades are posted will be charged only the tuition for the program into which he or she transfers. If the student subsequently withdraws, the days of attendance in each program will be counted from the original contract for refund calculations.

Exceptions to Academic Regulations

A request for an exception to a published University academic policy or a request for any special academic privilege must be made in writing and initiated through the Vice President/Academics (or designee) or an academic advisor. All documentary evidence in support of each petition for academic exception or academic privilege should be submitted via a written request. Each case will be decided on its own merits. All exceptions, waivers and special privileges are subject to review by the Vice President/Academics for a final decision. Students are encouraged to maintain their own personal copies of all paperwork submitted.

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PART 9: Course Descriptions Not all courses listed in this catalog are available each term at all campuses. The syllabi, course outlines, or lesson plans for courses in the programs of study at Coleman University are subject to changes at the discretion of instructors. Students are encouraged to select courses based on degree requirements and other factors related to individual instructors, but students should not consider syllabi used in prior terms or distributed at the start of a term, as an unalterable commitment of the instructor or of the University. Variations in the learning needs of students, inherent uncertainty in predicting exactly how material for a course should be covered, and an ambiguity in determining the most effective means of evaluating students, dictates that a design for instruction may need to be adjusted. Therefore, in order to be pedagogically responsible, the University allows that reading assignments, written assignments, examinations, daily topics, and the means and weights involved in the instructor’s evaluation of students, can change as needed after instruction has begun. Instructors are encouraged to be as faithful as possible to published syllabi or lesson plans. However, if altering these is judged by instructors to be necessary and appropriate, instructors may do so but are requested to share with their students in a timely manner how the course syllabi or lesson plans have changed.

Course Numbering System

The course numbering system is limited to three digits. The first digit indicates the year in which the course is usual taken within a program of study. The second and third digits may indicate the sequence in which the course should normally be taken. 000-099 Pre-baccalaureate developmental courses: Courses are not applicable to degree requirements. Preparatory courses 100-299 Lower-division undergraduate courses: Courses are general and introductory. They are intended to provide a foundation for advanced work. Courses primarily for first/second-year students 300-499 Upper-division undergraduate courses: Courses generally assume prior knowledge and experience in the subject, with content more advanced or specific than lower division courses. Courses primarily for third/fourth-year students 500-699 Graduate level courses: Courses are open to holders of a baccalaureate degree subject to prerequisite or other requirements as stated in program or course descriptions. Courses primarily for advanced undergraduate and graduate students # -Identifies courses that are offered online GE

-Identifies courses that are classified as General Education * -Identifies courses that are being taught out and that are no longer offered for future enrollments ATGDD

ATSD

-Courses that satisfies the Bachelor of Science in Game Programming Development and Design advanced technology requirement.

-This course satisfies the Bachelor of Science in Software Development advanced technology requirement. 113

ATNS

T/O

-This course satisfies the Bachelor of Science in Network Security advanced technology requirement. -This course is part of a teach-out plan for a discontinued program. Only students enrolled in the discontinued program may register for this course.

# BUS 200 Information Technology and Management (4 Units) This course introduces the consumer-driven business environment, with an emphasis on the use of information technology and information systems as used by businesses today. It describes the basics of information systems, and discusses how computer technology will be utilized in the 21st century and provides an overview of competitive strategies, ethics, global issues, and organizational responsiveness. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 103 Introduction to Game Programming (8 units) This course introduces the field of game programming, giving students a solid grasp of the concepts required to write a game. Students will learn and apply the basics of computer programming and key components including input, sound, and graphics, while developing a framework that will be applied in future game coursework. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 107 Introduction to Programming (8 Units) This course introduces the student to the basics of computer programming / application development. Production of quality application software stands at the core. Emphasis is on the implementation of application design documents and the testing of the software produced. Students will gain experience in solving real world problems by working in the interface between application design and application programming. Design techniques incorporated will include the use of IPO (input/process/output) charts, hierarchy charts, pseudocode and flow charts. Implementation will be accomplished in a high level programming language. Emphasis is on processing of data of both primitive and abstract types as well as the manipulation of that data. The standard programming structures sequence, selection and repetition receive intense focus. Modularization is also covered. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 112 Programming Logic and Design (4 Units) This course introduces the fundamentals of programming logic, program flow and the control statements needed to implement a programming solution and write an algorithm. The course covers problem analysis and definition, algorithm design, flowcharting, pseudocode, validation techniques, simple testing techniques, and the basic features of computer hardware, software, and data. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 122 Web Interface Development (4 Units) This course provides complete coverage of HTML, CSS, and XML including up-to-date coverage of HTML5 and CSS3 for Web site creation. It includes document enhancement with sound, video, and applets. Describes how Web forms are created and its interaction with a Web server. Included in the course it demonstrates using advanced CSS for designing or for the testing of mobile devices. This course introduces XML and how to create XML documents that include XML and mobile development. Finally it describes document validation against DTDs and schema vocabularies. Prerequisite(s): None.

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COM 124: Computer Foundations (4 units) This entry-level course ensures basic computer competency with an emphasis on software used by design professionals. Core concepts will include operating platforms, network basics, office productivity software and design software. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 152 Object-Oriented Programming I (8 Units) This course introduces the student to the object-oriented design / programming paradigm. The focus is on the creation of class hierarchies that provide solutions to real world problems. Concepts covered include class to object inheritance, class to class inheritance, encapsulation, code reusability, creation and use of interfaces and creation and manipulation of collections / lists. Prerequisite(s): COM107. COM 153 Game Programming Concepts (C++) (8 units) This course will introduce object-oriented programming in C++ using DirectX in the field of game programming. Students will learn the importance of game design, modular coding and using the APIs of graphics engines and DirectX to draw and display images, manipulate 3D meshes and objects, play Sounds and Audio files, use scripts and templates, and implement a peer to peer networked FPS game. Students will learn how to use an existing framework and how to apply it to future applications in an object-oriented manner. Prerequisite(s): COM 103. COM 154: Vector Graphics (4 units) This course is designed to help students create original vector art, as well as understand the importance and roll of vector graphics in modern graphic design. The course demonstrates the various tools and techniques for creating high-quality print and web graphics. Students will focus on creating several projects that center on essential methodologies used in the creation of professional artwork, including modern techniques, organization, and a multitude of output formats for both print and web. Prerequisite(s): DSN 104 and COM 124. COM 164: Layout 1 (4 units) This course provides a basic introduction to page layout software used by professional graphic designers to create print publications, interactive documents, eBooks, and digital magazines. Topics covered include the process of importing text and graphic files into layouts, the arrangement and transformation of these elements on single or multiple pages. Exporting final documents as PDF files and other formats will also be explored. Hands-on instruction and short easy-to-follow exercises are included. Prerequisite(s): DSN 134. COM 174: Digital Imaging I (4 units) This course introduces students to image-editing software as a design tool. Emphasis is placed on the application of design principles in the production process and the optimization of project workflow. Specific topics covered include properly scanning and digitizing artwork, enhancing and color correcting photographic images, optimizing images for web delivery, manipulating graphics, and applying advanced effects to enhance existing art or create new art. Prerequisite(s): DSN 114, COM 124, and DSN 144. COM 184: Marketing for Designers This course introduces students to core marketing concepts, with an emphasis on the designer’s role in marketing activities. Course concepts will include identifying target markets and determining creative approaches to delivering specific marketing messages to consumers. Specific activities will include analyzing and developing advertisem*nts through the creative 115

process, and exploring the relationship between graphic design and consumer behavior. Prerequisite(s): DSN 134 and DSN 154. COM 202 Object-Oriented Programming II (8 Units) Best practices in object-oriented include implementing software designs with highcohesion, low-coupled architectures. This course will provide opportunities for the student to develop proficiency in high-quality code within the object-oriented programming approach. Attention to creating quality code reaps benefits for the programmer as an application matures in that it supports updating, patching errors, and extending the functionality of it. No published software may ignore best practices in the implementation phase; consumer expectations of functionality and reliability require robust programming practices to meet expected turnaround times for software system extensions and bug fixes. Prerequisite(s): COM152 or COM285. COM 203 Game Programming Logic (C++) (8 units) This course will further develop the student’s knowledge of Object Oriented Programming (OOP), enabling the student to write well- structured game programs. The student will study OOP concepts such as objects, classes, abstraction, inheritance, encapsulation, and polymorphism along with basic concepts, such as pointers. The students are also introduced to additional libraries, which will be used to increase their understanding of the basic concepts of graphics and game programming. Prerequisite(s): COM107. COM204: Digital Imaging 2 (4 units) This course encompasses a more in-depth look at image-editing software as a design tool. Emphasis is placed on the application of design principles in a non-destructive production process. Also emphasized is the optimization of project workflow for output to multiple types of media. Specific topics covered include: file organization, image development in Camera RAW, painting, advanced selections, advanced photo repair, colorization and color correction, automation and filters, vectors, animation and video, archiving, and exporting. Prerequisite(s): COM 174. COM 214: Layout 2 (4 units) This course will focus on the interactive features of page layout software used by professional graphic designers to create interactive PDF and SWF files, eBooks, and digital magazines as well as print publications. Course concepts will include typical client requests for both print documents and files that can be viewed onscreen, and how designers can take advantage of interactive features to create rich publications enhanced with animation and navigational sign posts. Students will experience considerable hands-on instruction as well as short easy-to-follow exercises. Prerequisite(s): COM 164. COM 222 Client-Side Web Programming (4 Units) This course provides an introduction to JavaScript and the related technologies, AJAX and DHTML. This course of study provides the student with in depth client-side scripting capabilities. The students will be guided through the fundamentals of JavaScript syntax as well as the jQuery basics such as selecting and manipulating DOM elements, assigning attributes, traversing tools, and CSS/Styling. Subsequent modules will delve deeper into advanced concepts such as jQuery core, events and effects, plugins, embedding API’s, performance best practices, and managing dependencies. Industry standard software testing and debugging techniques are also introduced. Prerequisite(s): COM122 or COM287. 116

DSN224: Web Design 1 (4 units) This course will provide students a foundational overview of professional web development. Course concepts will include website planning and development. Specific activities will include gathering client input and determining requirements, website layout and interface design, graphic design best practices as applied to web development, as well as methods and techniques for website creation. Prerequisite(s): COM 174. *COM 230 SQL and Database Design (8 Units) This course is an introduction to Database Design and the SQL language. The Relational Database model will be covered in detail, along with basic database design and the fundamentals of the SQL data manipulation language. The focus will be on data retrieval, but design concepts and data normalization will also be discussed. Database administration and security will also be introduced. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 232 SQL and Database Design (4 Units) This course is an introduction to Database Design and the SQL language. The Relational Database model will be covered in detail, along with basic database design and the fundamentals of the SQL data manipulation language. The focus will be on data retrieval, but design concepts and data normalization will also be discussed. Database administration and security will also be introduced. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 233 Level Design I (4 Units) This course introduces the student to the Unity Game Engine. Topics include: incorporating terrains and externally produced 3D models, utilizing a first person character, scripting and animation, particle systems, sound, lighting, shadows, and more. It takes a practical approach, and enables the student to rapidly use the Unity Game Engine to develop games. Prerequisite(s): COM 103 and DSN 140. DSN234: Multimedia (4 units) This course provides students with experience in various techniques for developing multimedia projects. Emphasis will be placed on video compositing and special effects for output to broadcast media, the web, and mobile devices. Specific topics will include combining images, text and sound effect components with voice overs, the creative process, and how Graphic Design specifically applies to the video production process. Prerequisite(s): COM 134 and COM 174. COM 239 Software Testing (4 Units) This course provides an introduction to systematic and organized approaches to software testing. The goal of the course is to provide students with the skill to select and apply a testing strategy and testing techniques that are appropriate to a particular software system or component. In addition, the student will become familiar with using a web-based bug tracking tool to assess the effectiveness of their testing activity, and to provide evidence to justify their evaluation. Students will learn the theory behind criteria-based test design and to apply that theory in practice. Topics include test case design, the various levels of testing, test management, evaluating software quality, validation of test outputs, report generation, test coverage criteria, STLC, and test metrics. Prerequisite(s): COM152. COM 242 Server-Side Web Development (4 Units) 117

In this course the student will learn to develop applications that serve as the informational backbone for the World Wide Web and Internet services. The student will create dynamically-generated web pages, draw and deliver information from database systems, secure information assets, receive validated inputs, and deliver, retrieve, and manipulate files, images and other assets. Prerequisite(s): COM222 and COM230. COM 244: Content Management Systems (4 units) This course is designed to help students identify the advantages of using a Content Management System (CMS), and use their acquired knowledge to construct and deploy a fully functional website. The course demonstrates the benefits of CMS solutions, and reviews common terminology and development strategies using industry-standard software. Guidelines are included for installing CMS programs, and configuring databases, themes, widgets, and plugins. Prerequisite(s): COM 224. COM 253 Game Programming (C# ) (8 units) This course introduces the student to programming interactive computer games with an emphasis on C# programming, using Direct X. The student will explore the basics of C#, implementation of fundamental tasks in Direct3D, and combine a variety of techniques and special effects into a playable game. Prerequisite(s): COM 103. COM 259 Linux Fundamentals (8 Units) History, concepts, and facilities of the LINUX operating system will be discussed. The course introduces the user interface, common commands, and basic system administration of a LINUX operating system. Students will learn how to write and execute LINUX shell scripts used for the controlled execution of a series of basic LINUX commands. The basics of script writing – creation, writing in the shell programming language, debugging, and execution – will be covered, along with an overview of built-in shell commands available to the user. Advanced topics will include use of user/shell/environmental variables, script commands for decision-making, looping and flow-control, and creation of shell aliases and functions. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 262 Mobile Development (8 Units) This course provides an introduction to Mobile Development. The students will learn application development on the Android platform. Topics will include memory management; user interface design; user interface building; input methods; data handling; network techniques; and finally, specifics such as GPS and motion sensing. Students are expected to work on a project that produces a professional-quality mobile application. Projects will be deployed in real-world applications. Course work will include project conception, design, implementation, and pilot testing on an actual handheld device. Prerequisite(s): COM202. *COM 270 C# Programming I (8 Units) This course introduces students to C# and the use of Graphical User Interface (GUI) forms to develop event-driven solutions to business problems. Students also acquire skills using ADO .NET tools to access databases. Sequential I/O access of text files is also covered. Projects are designed to simulate real-world application solution scenarios. Prerequisite(s): COM230. *COM271 C# Programming II (8 Units) 118

The course covers advanced topics and concepts in C# and provides hands-on experience using one of the most popular object-oriented languages to date. Students will learn how to properly design programs using C# as a language leveraging the .NET libraries. Advanced topics will be discussed and utilized including the collection framework, delegates, events, assemblies and generics. The course also provides practical examples that the students need to master the core capabilities of C# and advance their proficiency in developing applications for the .NET environment utilizing Visual C#. Prerequisite(s): COM270. *COM272 ASP.NET (4 Units) Students will learn to develop website applications using Microsoft technologies. In this course students will develop a dynamic web application demonstrating an understanding of ASP.NET, .NET Web Services, and ADO .NET. Prerequisite(s): COM230, COM270, and COM287. COM 273 XNA (8 units) In this course students will be introduced to the basic components of XNA and the XNA Framework. The student will import both 2D sprites and 3D animations, draw complex terrain, and implement collision detection in multiplayer games. Network support issues will also be addressed. The student will build a framework to be used to develop rich playable games for common console systems. Prerequisite(s): COM253. *COM 280 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (4 Units) The primary objective of this course is to ensure that, by the end of the course, every student is able to perform object-oriented analysis and design by modeling a complex system utilizing the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and applying the Rational Unified Process (RUP) method. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 283 3D Game Programming with DirectX10 (4 Units) This course introduces programming interactive computer graphics using DirectX10. The course is designed to give the student a deeper understanding of how vectors, matrices, and transformations are used in computer games. The student will also explore techniques for creating special effects, including reflections, while learning new features such as geometry shaders and the rendering pipeline. Prerequisite(s): COM203. COM 285 Intermediate Java (8 Units) This course teaches students the basics of Object Oriented programming including the concepts of Object, Inheritance, Polymorphism, Abstraction and Interfaces. The course teaches students to apply OOP concepts using GUI, Threads, Streams and Networking. The course covers customized exception handling. Prerequisite(s): COM107. *COM 287 Internet Programming I (4 Units) This course introduces students to the world of e-commerce creating the foundation for the design, implementation, and maintenance of effective Web pages in support of business objectives and goals. The student gains skills in the use of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), JavaScript, and cascading style sheet language as well as a foundation in the principles of ecommerce. Prerequisite(s): None. *COM 288 Internet Programming II (4 Units) This course expands on the foundational web programming skills learned in COM 287. 119

The present course expands those capabilities through the introduction of JavaScript and the related technologies, AJAX and DHTML. This course of study provides the student with in depth client side scripting capabilities. Industry standard software testing and debugging techniques are also introduced. Prerequisite(s): COM287. *COM 289 Internet Programming III (4 Units) This course expands on the fundamentals of the Java programming language. Projects introduce the student to the creation of web application utilizing Java Servlets and Java Server Pages. The student gains facility in the merging of Java with Structured Query Language and the MySQL database. Prerequisite(s): COM285 and COM287. COM 290 Systems Design and Implementation (8 Units) Students will apply the fundamental concepts of systems analysis and design in a comprehensive capstone project. Students will use the concepts and skill sets acquired in the previous classes to design and build an IT solution in a real world business scenario. The comprehensive capstone project will require students to work cooperatively in designing and implementing all aspects of an IT system. Prerequisite(s): COM239, COM242, and COM262. COM 293 Game Programming Capstone (8 units) The comprehensive capstone project will require students to work cooperatively to design and implement a game. Students will apply the concepts of game architecture and design acquired in previous classes to create at least one level of a comprehensive game that will include opening, game play, credits, and documentation. Project will require students to work cooperatively in designing and implementing their own game. Prerequisite(s): COM 233, and DSN 263. ATGDD

COM 303 3D Printing and Modeling (4 Units) This course introduces the student to the wonderful world of 3D printing. Since its introduction, 3D printing is being used for more and more innovative solutions, from prototyping and production of new products to reproducing human organs. This class will cover production of quality 3D models and the proper procedure for printing them correctly. Prerequisite(s): None.

ATSD

COM 310 Advanced .NET (4 Units) Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have a better understanding of object orientated programming in the .NET. This course will cover objects and classes, including polymorphism and inheritance. The concepts of input validation, classic and structure error handling will be covered. In order to add functionality to class projects, SQL Server will be utilized. This course will also cover additional topics including collections, generics, and multithreading. An advanced look into Windows forms will be taken, in order to better understand the code generated by the .NET environment, and reports will be incorporated into projects. Prerequisite(s): COM202 or and COM242.

ATSD

# COM 319 Internet Applications and Development (4 Units) This course introduces students to practical applications for modern Web page design. Practical and theoretical aspects of Web page management will be discussed in conjunction with the latest international standards from the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium). Prerequisite(s): None. 120

ATSD

# COM 324 Advanced Internet Applications and Development (4 Units) An introduction to the use of scripting languages in the development of Internet related content. Topics include code integration, form validation, and the use of industry standard techniques in Internet programming. Prerequisite(s): COM288 and COM319.

ATSD

COM 330 Perl Programming (4 Units) This course introduces the Perl (Practical Extraction and Report Language) programming language. Students will write a series of Perl scripts, assigned by the instructor, that will generate code, manipulate dates and times, parse text, convert database file formats, and store, manipulate, retrieve, and display data on the World Wide Web using the common gateway interface and Perl modules. Prerequisite(s): COM 107.

ATSD

COM 340 E-Commerce Concepts (4 Units) This course introduces the concepts, vocabulary, and procedures associated with e-commerce and the Internet. Topics include development of the Internet and e-commerce, prospects for business-to-business and business-to-consumer e-commerce, options available for doing business on the Internet, marketing issues related to e-commerce, tools used to build an ecommerce website, features of e-commerce websites, payment options, security issues, and customer service. Prerequisite(s): None.

ATSD

COM 350 Visual Basic Programming (4 Units) This course introduces students to Visual Basic .NET and the use of Graphical User Interface (GUI) forms to develop event-driven solutions to business problems. Students also acquire skills using advanced Visual Basic .NET tools to access databases as well as random access of text files. Sequential I/O access of text files is also covered. Projects are designed to simulate actual industry application solution scenarios. Prerequisite(s): COM 290.

ATGDD

COM 373 LUA Scripting (4 Units) This course introduces the LUA scripting language in the context of video game implementation and design. Students will discover the power and simplicity of scripting languages in a hands-on approach that will cover every major video game requirement from standard game mechanics and simple artificial intelligence to graphical user interface implementation and graphics rendering. Prerequisite(s): COM 293.

ATSD

COM 380 Advanced C++ .NET Programming (4 Units) This course is a study of object-oriented programming with Visual C++.NET as the medium of expression. Topics include object-based programming, Visual C++.NET Input/Output streams, managed extensions for C++, Visual C++.NET functions, references, classes, encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism as well as ADO.NET. Prerequisite(s): COM275 or COM 203.

ATSD

COM 390 C Programming (4 Units) This course is designed to give students the programming experience to learn and develop programs with the C language. Language and solutions development will be from a programmer’s point of view. Topics include C program structure, formatting data types, operators, expressions and statements, control flow structures for looping, branches, arrays, pointers, bitwise operators, and file handling. The student will learn and understand the C pointer environment and the Microsoft Visual Studio IDE environment. Prerequisite(s): COM290. 121

ATGDD

ATSD

COM 403 Advanced DirectX (4 Units) This course enables the students to apply Direct3D to implement a variety of interesting techniques and special effects. The students will learn and implement techniques such as working with meshes, terrain rendering, picking, particle systems, environment mapping, normal mapping, shadows, and rendering to textures. Prerequisite(s): COM283.

COM 410 Python (4 Units) Python is used in a variety of tasks in the computing industry, from automated scripts to graphical user interfaces. This course will introduce the Python language, as well as the versatile roles it can play in the computing industry. We will investigate topics such as: automation, data structures, and web development. Prerequisite(s): COM 290.

ATGDD

COM 413 Game AI Concepts (4 Units) This course identifies the core types of AI behavior and their uses, such as pathfinding, fuzzy logic, cooperative behavior, decision trees, neural nets, adaptive and heuristics. It will illustrate how game AI creates challenges and a sense of satisfaction for the gamer. The student will create and implement AI agents through a variety of means. Prerequisite(s): COM 293.

ATGDD

COM 493 Game Development Internship (4 Units) The student will be employed by a local business/organization to apply the knowledge, practice the skills, and display the attitudes developed during the course of study for the respective student’s degree. The focus of this course is on the further development of skills learned in a real business/project. Prerequisite(s): None.

ATSD

COM 495 Software Development Internship (4 Units) The student will be employed by a local business/organization to apply the knowledge, practice the skills, and display the attitudes developed during the course of study for the respective student’s degree. The focus of this course is on the development/execution of a real world project. Prerequisite(s): None

COM 620 Advanced Systems Analysis and Design (5 Units) This course is designed to give students a solid foundation in systems analysis and design. The course provides in-depth coverage of established and evolving methods in information system development, demonstrating that the key to successful information system implementation starts with proper analysis and design. The course provides a broad overview of information systems development approaches including traditional structured approaches and newer object oriented approaches. As future IT managers, students will gain a general understanding of the tasks performed by systems analysts and designers. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 640 Distributive Communications & New Technology (5 Units) This course explores the basics and convergence of current data and voice communications on a local and global level, utilizing both conducted and radiated media. Reference and usage networking models are employed to reduce the complexity of the communications systems involved. Important protocols and standards at various networking layers are discussed in detail. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 656 Management of Information Security (5 Units) 122

This course focuses on the managerial aspects of information security and assurance. Topics covered include access control models, information security governance, and information security program assessment and metrics. Coverage on the foundational and technical components of information security is included to reinforce key concepts. The course includes up-to-date information on changes in the field, such as national and international laws and international standards like the ISO 27000 series. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 660 Database Systems (5 Units) This course is designed to give students a solid foundation in practical database design. The course provides in-depth coverage of database design, demonstrating that the key to successful database implementation is in proper design of databases to fit within a larger strategic view of the data environment. As future IT managers, students will gain a general understanding of the tasks performed by database modelers, designers, developers, and administrators. Prerequisite(s): None. # COM 665 Leadership (5 Units) An interactive study of the techniques, traits, and skills needed by the leader in today’s business environment. Topics include conflict resolution, mentoring, training and development, and identification of leadership talent in organizations. Various models and business cultures will be discussed to assist students in improving the organization behavior in the work place. Prerequisite(s): None. # COM 671 Business Intelligence and Decision Support Systems (5 Units) This course provides an overview of business intelligence and data warehousing and explores the major facets of developing and using a data warehouse to make effective business decisions. The course introduces the development of systems designed to capture relevant data from all segments of an enterprise, to organize the data into a coherent structure, and to provide the means to analyze the data to make rational decision using statistical calculations. The course will allow the students to gain an understanding of the decision making process utilizing both Microsoft Excel and ExpertChoice-Comparion software. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 685 Management of Network Technology Readiness (5 Units) This course provides a detailed overview of the role of a manager of network technologies with respect to assessing a business’s readiness for electronic commerce. Specifically, this course addresses several flexible strategies for sustaining Web-based commerce, including identifying the correct business model, techniques for creating sustainable electronic commerce value, integrating net and business priorities, aligning leadership and governance models for maximum impact, and using the net to redraw the boundaries of industry. Emphasis is on the new rules that management uses for successful business modeling in the explosive Web-based industry of electronic commerce. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 690 Management of Emerging Technologies (5 Units) This course focuses on the practical application of innovation. It examines the innovation process, research and development, and product development. The management of high-tech marketing, service innovation, and biotechnology innovation are also addressed. There is an emphasis on the business and technological base of innovation. Prerequisite(s): None. COM 695 Independent Study (By Arrangement)

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A learning contract is written between the student and professor that outlines specific objectives and learning activities for the student. Credit for independent study is limited to five units. Prerequisite(s): None. DSN 104: Drawing for Graphic Design (4 units) This studio course provides students with direct experience in a variety of drawing techniques to sharpen perception, stimulate imagination, and increase the student’s ability to see and interpret the world around them. Emphasis is placed on using these techniques to accelerate the creative process in Graphic Design. Course concepts include composition, single and multiple point perspectives, gestural and contour drawing, quick sketching, line, shape, color, value, and form. This class is designed to improve students' drawing skills and help them be competitive in the design industry. Prerequisite(s): None. DSN 114: Design Principles (4 units) This course provides students the opportunity to apply basic drawing skills and brainstorming techniques to generate a variety of design ideas and solutions. Core concepts include the recognition and application of design elements and principles to construct balanced, organized original compositions and employing drawing skills in the creative design process as part of a typical professional workflow. Specific topics will include drawing techniques, design principles, integrating type into compositions, and how to create meaningful design. Prerequisite(s): None. DSN 123 Fundamentals of Game Design (4 units) This course covers the basic elements of game design including what a game is, how a game works, and what decisions must be made before the start of any project. The student will learn about user experience, core mechanics, and different game genres, conventions, and pitfalls. Prerequisite(s): None. DSN 130 Typography (4 units) This course presents an overview of the history, anatomy, and terminology of typography and the importance of type as a design element in digital technology. Students use the computer as a tool for designing effective typographical solutions and apply the fundamentals of typesetting to create well-organized, legible information. Suitable type selection and type design details are thoroughly explored. Prerequisite(s): None. DSN 134: Typography (4 units) This course will present an overview of the history, anatomy and terminology of typography as well as reiterate design principles as they pertain to the use of type in marketing communication and design. Course concepts will include challenging students to consider what a glyph or letterform is communicating on an unconscious as well as visual level in order to apply typography that communicates appropriate marketing messages. By continually asking themselves, “How does this typeface make me feel?”, “What does this typeface communicate?”, and “Is this the correct typeface for my message and audience?” students will hone their ability to apply course concepts in the context of the real world. Prerequisite(s): DSN 104, DSN 114, and COM 124. DSN 140 Digital Images I (4 units) This course introduces students to image-editing software as a design tool. Emphasis is placed on the application of design principles in the production process and the optimization of project workflow. Specific topics covered include properly scanning and digitizing artwork, enhancing 124

and color correcting photographic images, optimizing images for web delivery, manipulating graphics, and applying advanced effects to enhance existing art or create new art. Prerequisite(s): None. DSN 144: Digital Photography (4 units) Students will explore techniques in commercial digital photography as applied to graphic design in order to better understand the physical, conceptual and theoretical characteristics of digital photography as it pertains to creating commercial art. Emphasis will be placed on the students' development of digital photography skills in producing expressive and thoughtful images for design projects. Course concepts will include how to look at and critique photography, photographic vocabulary, exploring concepts such as framing, composition, "rule of thirds", light, texture, pattern, lines, symmetry, depth of field, distance, perspective, culture, space, balance, color, as well as black and white. Prerequisite(s): DSN 104. DSN 180 Animation I (4 units) This course provides students with an opportunity to experience how the creative process is applied in the creation of dynamic, interactive animation. Foundational topics include project planning, timeline control, storyboarding, and digital narrative. Kinematics, integration of sound, and publishing files to the World Wide Web are also explored. Prerequisite(s): None. DSN 253 Hard Surface Modeling (4 units) This course focuses on polygon modeling, texturing, and animation in the 3D environment; emphasis will be placed on low-poly modeling for gaming. Students create and manipulate primitive shapes; apply position, texturing, lighting and rendering of scenes/environments. Students will create the basic building blocks for producing still images, animate 3D models and scenes for the game programmer. Prerequisite(s): DSN 140. DSN254: Web Design 2 (4 units) This course will provide an overview of professional web design implementation. Core concepts will include structuring HTML for website layouts, utilizing CSS to control aesthetics, and the methods and techniques used to implement a functional web layout. Specific activities will include creating a variety of website layouts, and designing layout variants for multiple devices. Prerequisite(s): DSN 224. DSN 263 Shader Materials (4 units) The student will apply the concepts and skills from previous classes to create animated scenes. The focus will be on 2D texturing for a 3D program and the image layout needed to create realistic interactive environments. The student will learn the process of layout and texture creation and implement it in a 3D animation scene. On completion of this class, the student will have created a scene incorporating various textures. Prerequisite(s): DSN 253. DSN264: Print Production Essentials (4 units) This course explores the technology and terminology of the printing process from the electronic design perspective. Preparation of art for production, working with vendors, and developing projects from design through press-ready files will be the focus of the course. Prerequisite(s): DSN 114 and COM 124. DSN 273 Introduction to Digital Sculpting (4 Units) 125

This course is designed to introduce students to ZBrush. The student is introduced to the concepts required to create realistic and highly detailed 3D organic, mechanical, and architectural models required for modern game art design. The student will learn the essential techniques and tools to quickly design concept, prototype, and final pieces for rich game scenes and characters. This class is designed to stimulate the creative spirit of the student by exploring several creative methods used to produce high quality game components, as required by the industry. Prerequisite(s): DSN 253. DSN274: Professional Practices (4 units) In this course, students will explore standards and practices in the graphic design profession. Emphasis is placed on communication, professional relationships, and the economic interests of designers. Specific topics include pricing structures, copyright protection, ethical guidelines, contracts & forms, project schedules, and business taxes. Prerequisite(s): DSN 184. DSN294: Portfolio (4 units) This course is the culmination of the students’ design coursework at Coleman University. The student will design a résumé and assemble one digital, one print portfolio and one leave behind that includes 5-10 design pieces that best represent the student’s skills, abilities and knowledge. Prerequisite(s): DSN 184, COM 204, COM 214, DSN 234, COM 244, DSN 254, and DSN 264. ATGDD

DSN 343 Game Story and Character Design (4 Units) This particular course will teach the students how to build unique story worlds and create true, interactive narrative. Students will also learn how to create compelling characters that the player will continue to identify with throughout the game while following the traditional character arc, deviating when required. They will also be introduced to the important, basic concepts involved in the traditional Creative Writing medium such as: the Syd Field Paradigm, the Hero’s Journey from Joseph Campbell, plot structure through the plot mountain diagram, and plot devices like En Media Res.

ATGDD

DSN 353 Level Design (4 Units) This course focuses the skill set by taking the student step by step through the process of planning, construction, and refining an original level that has been designed for this course. This course will cover the unique learning experience by providing a design experience utilizing the industry standard Unreal 3 Engine/ Unreal Development Kit. After creating a concept for the game, the student will work through the blueprint, blocking in, building, lighting, scripting, and polishing of a game level. Prerequisite(s): COM233 and DSN263.

ATGDD

DSN 433 MEL Scripting in Maya (4 Units) This course covers MEL scripting with a character rigging focus. The course is intended for the intermediate 3D artists who are interested in enhancing the 3D production process in Maya. The course will cover each major rigging task in the Maya interface, and covers how to efficiently code the same task using MEL. In the process, the course focuses on creation of a character to rig, creating skeletons and icons, parent’s nodes into a hierarchy, connect constraint channels, and deform a skin model.

# ENG 110 College Composition (4 Units) GE 126

Instruction in the theory and guidelines of composition for college writing with an emphasis on the following: grammar review, rhetorical strategies, essay writing, collaborative writing, and academic writing. This course must be taken within the first term of Distance Education or before any other Distance Education class. Prerequisite(s): None. ENG 200 Communications (4 Units) GE Communications is designed to introduce students to the theory and use of human and public communication. Various types of communication studied include the following: perception, listening, verbal, nonverbal, interpersonal, intercultural, small group, organizational, and public speaking. Prerequisite(s): None. ENG 300 Professional Presentation Skills and Techniques (4 Units) GE This course focuses on theory and principles of multimedia presentation software and communication skills necessary to produce professional presentations. Students practice the integration of various multimedia sources into MS PowerPoint. Verbal, nonverbal, interpersonal, group, organizational, and public speaking skills will be developed. Prerequisite(s): None. ENG 302 Comparative Literature (4 Units) GE Comparative literature will look at literature from various parts of the world. The emphasis in this class will be in reading and interpreting works as well as analytical research. The class will focus on material from 1650s to present day. Prerequisite(s): ENG110. # ENG 320 Technical Writing (4 Units) GE Theory, organization, requirements, rhetorical strategies and collaborative writing skills are emphasized in the composition of technical communications, including definitions, mechanical descriptions, instructions, process analyses, and technical documents. Prerequisite(s): ENG 110. ENG 330 Writing the Screenplay (4 Units) GE Screenwriting will teach students how to analyze screenplays as a form of literature distinct from fiction and poetry. Students will learn how to analyze screenplays in terms of characterization, setting, dialogue, point of view, and plot. They will apply their analytical skills to writing an essay, defending the quality and ability of a particular screenplay in conveying a story through these elements. They will apply their skills to writing their own original screenplays, developing their own creative and analytical thinking abilities. Prerequisite(s): ENG110. # ENG 351 Creative Writing (4 Units) GE Creative writing is designed to give students experience writing a variety of forms of fiction. Students will keep creative writing journals, create poetry, and write a short story. The course will also introduce students to a variety of Web-based and community groups for creative writers. Prerequisite(s): ENG 110. # ENG 450 Science Fiction (4 Units) GE This course is a study of the classic themes and ideas in use in Science Fiction literature, in conjunction with a historical analysis of the changes that have occurred in the genre from its formative years to the present day. Prerequisite(s): ENG 110. # ENG 460 Thriller and Horror (4 Units) GE 127

An analytical study of modern horror and thriller literature, emphasizing the contributions made by each of the standard elements of fiction - plot, characterization, setting, point of view and theme - to the visceral impact of the genre. Warning: This course requires discussions on materials that contain adult themes and language. Prerequisite(s): ENG 110. ENG 490 Comics as Literature (4 Units) GE Students will investigate and analyze the various genres within sequential art. In-class and outside readings will assist students in understanding the connection between graphic storytelling, contemporary society, and world literature. This course will stress the importance of visual literacy and critical thinking as it applies to narration and storytelling. Topics covered will include memoir, literary fiction, superheroes, social commentaries, and web comics. Prerequisite(s): ENG 110. # HUM 110 Introduction to the Humanities I (4 Units) GE The student will develop an understanding and appreciation of man’s cultural heritage from ancient Mesopotamia to the Middle Ages. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach to the comparative humanities, including a study of literature, philosophy, music, visual arts, and history. Prerequisite(s): None. # HUM 115 Introduction to the Humanities II (4 Units) GE This course is a continued study of man’s cultural heritage from the beginnings of modernity in the Renaissance and 17th century through the European Enlightenment and Romanticism in the 18th and early 19th centuries, and Modernism and Postmodernism in the 20th century. An interdisciplinary approach is used to compare literature, philosophy, music, visual arts, and history. Prerequisite(s): None. # HUM 225 Ethics (4 Units) GE This course is an exploration of basic theories of right and wrong, including the concepts of divine law, intuition utilitarianism, egoism, existentialism and situation ethics. Prerequisite(s): ENG110. # HUM 306 American Art (4 Units) GE American Art explores the epic history of art in America as reflected by artists in every medium and genre, from “primitive” portraits of the Colonial era to the complex visions of the present day. The unique vision of American Art will be presented through lectures, discussions, and multimedia presentations emphasizing formal analysis and historical context. Prerequisite(s): HUM 110 or HUM115. # HUM 320 World Drama (4 Units) GE This course is a survey of selected masterpieces of world drama. It includes reading plays by Euripides, Shakespeare, Moliere, Ibsen, Chekov, and Tennessee Williams, and viewing film versions of classical and modern drama. Prerequisite(s): HUM110 or HUM 115. # HUM 410 The Art of the Film (4 Units) A comprehensive study of various elements, both artistic and technical, involved in the development of a successful film. It includes substantial film viewing requirements that must be met by the student. Prerequisite(s): HUM 110 or 115. 128

#HUM 415 Folklore (4 Units) Students will consider the role that folklore plays in the lives of people around the world. In class and outside readings will focus on a variety of traditional genres including legend, folktale, riddle, folk group, art, and music. Through fieldwork, a research paper, and course materials, students will explore the way(s) that folklore contributes to their contemporary lives. This course will stress the importance of folklore in regards to issues of identity, class, ethnicity, and nationalism. Prerequisite(s): ENG110 # HUM 420 Comparative Religion (4 Units) GE This course is a comparative study of the great religions of the world. Philosophy of culture is explored and the important developments in Eastern and Western philosophy are considered. This course does not take a definitive position on the relative merits of the religions examined. Prerequisite(s): HUM110 or HUM115. # HUM 490 World History Through the Graphic Novel, 1900-Present (4 Units) GE Students will understand and analyze world history from 1900 to the present through graphic novels. In class and outside reading will encourage students to identify historical trends through nontraditional sources. This course will stress the importance of visual literacy and how it relates to history. Historical trends that will be discussed include manifest destiny, world relations and economy, and colonialism. Prerequisite(s): HUM 110 or115. # MAN 303 Principles of Business (4 Units) This course will provide an overview of the operations, major functions, management, and global context of modern businesses. Subjects will include Strategy, the Global Business Environment, Ethics, Entrepreneurship, Customer Service, Leadership, Marketing, Accounting, Finance, E-commerce, and Information Technology’s role in business. Prerequisite(s): None. # MAN 310 Business Law (4 Units) This course focuses on the operation of the law as it pertains to business; basic elements of contracts, agency partnerships, corporations, real property and sales. It includes study of the Uniform Commercial Code. Prerequisite(s): None. # MAN 315 Principles of Marketing (4 Units) This course explores the total marketing function including pricing, promotion, distribution, product planning, and development. Consumer behavior, global markets and new technologies are examined. Prerequisite(s): None. MAN 320 Planning the Small or Home Office (SOHO) Business (4 Units) This course is an overview of the establishment and operation of a small business with an emphasis on the Small Office/Home Office. It includes the business plan, financing, marketing, staffing the organization, and facilities requirements. Prerequisite(s): None. MAN 325 Operating the Small or Home Office (SOHO) Business (4 Units) This course is an overview of the management and operations of a small business. It includes supply chain management, pricing and credit, promotional planning, leadership and human resources, managing risk exposure, managing assets, and financial evaluation. Prerequisite(s): None. 129

# MAN 330 Leadership, Supervision and Conflict Management (4 Units) Designed to enhance students’ managerial capabilities, this course investigates the attitudes, personalities, traits, and behaviors of various leaders. Styles of power and influence are examined; conflict resolution skills are practiced. Prerequisite(s): None. # MAN 350 Organizational Behavior (4 Units) This course examines individual, interpersonal, and group dynamics in the formal organization and reviews the relationship between diversity, personality, motivation, perception, communication, and the management processes of work design, creativity, and technology. The practical applications of team skills in problem solving and decision making are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): None. # MAT 162 Algebra I (4 Units) GE This course focuses on intermediate algebra, which serves as the foundation for calculus and statistics. Topics include real numbers, equations and inequalities in one variable, linear equations and their graphs, functions, and systems of linear equations. Prerequisite(s): None. MAT 300 Statistics (4 Units) GE This course is concerned with the increasing complexity confronting the citizens in today’s world. It covers the role that statistics can play in the decision-making process. It also covers statistical procedures aimed at presenting, interpreting, planning, and conducting statistical analysis. Prerequisite(s): MAT162. # MBA 615 Project Management (5 Units) This course focuses on learning the principles, practices, and techniques of project management using a practical, day-to-day approach. It examines resource constraints, people issues, and use of statistical tools. Topics include change, leadership skills, communication, team, and cultural diversity, scheduling concepts, problem solving techniques, Work Breakdown Structure, time/cost tradeoff techniques, critical path analyses, and use of a project management application. The concepts expressed here are accessible to students of all backgrounds. Prerequisite(s): None. # MBA 620 International Business Management (5 Units) This course provides an overview of the meaning of globalization and its impact on business management. It introduces students to the structure of global business, global forces that act on managing businesses locally, and the importance of understanding the laws and policies of other nations for effective business management in a global context. This course describes business planning, organization, marketing, and competitive intelligence for local businesses conducting international activities. Prerequisite(s): None. # MBA 625 Marketing (5 Units) This course provides students an opportunity to explore various aspects of Marketing from a managerial perspective. Because the specific responsibilities of a marketing manager vary across industries and firms, the focus of the coursework is on general decision-making and critical thinking skills. By honing these core skills, and developing the ability to articulate ideas in writing, students who successfully complete the course will enter professional life well equipped for dealing with the fluid nature of marketing problems facing individual organizations. Prerequisite(s): None. 130

# MBA 630 Quantitative Management (5 Units) This course focuses on the typical mathematical and quantitative reasoning skills needed in business management. Emphasis is on the practical application and problem-solving skills required of today’s business professional as well as the investor and consumer. Students will use Excel spreadsheets to assist in mathematical analyses and quantitative reasoning assignments. Prerequisite(s): None. # MBA 635 Management Support Through Information Systems (5 Units) This course explores information systems and how they support strategic analysis, planning, decision-making, communication, collaboration, and intra- and inter-organizational transactions. Packaged products, custom-built solutions, vendor selection, and emerging technologies are examined through common business scenarios. Prerequisite(s): None. # MBA 640 Strategic Planning (5 Units) This course covers strategic planning and innovation by analyzing both the internal and external factors of the business environment. Managing change in internal processes and structures will be addressed. Emphasis is placed on the use of technology to support planning, implementation, and evaluation of strategic management techniques. Prerequisite(s): None. # MBA 650 Organizational Design for Effectiveness (5 Units) This course examines emerging conceptual frameworks for understanding organizational design, structure, behavior, analysis, and practices of organizational design to enhance business effectiveness. It also examines techniques for improving member fulfillment by means of planned change. Prerequisite(s): None. # MBA 655 Human Resource Management (5 Units) The course explores personnel management for effective business practices, including employee selection, training, retention, and evaluation. The impact of the human relations factor on organizational effectiveness is also discussed. Prerequisite(s): None. # MBA 680 Financial Management and Analysis (5 Units) This course prepares students to select and analyze accounting information for internal use by managers for decision-making, planning, directing, and controlling purposes. The focus is on cost terms and concepts, cost behavior, cost structure, and cost- volume-profit analysis, with an examination of profit planning, standard costs, operations and capital budgeting, cost control, and accounting for costs in organizations. Prerequisite(s): None. MHC 675 Survey of the U.S. Health Care System (5 units) T/O This course offers a systematic approach to understanding the nature, structure, and functions of the U.S. health care system. Topics include the history of medical care in the U.S. with descriptions of the variety of health personnel and facilities that comprise the system, including an investigation of selected contemporary health policy issues, public health, mental health, medical insurance coverage, current federal statutes and standards, and alternative systems. Prerequisite(s): None. MHC 685 Financial Management for Health Care Organizations (5 units) T/O This course provides students with a foundation for using modern techniques of financial decision-making, planning, directing, and controlling purposes in health care organizations. The 131

course introduces students to selected financial topics such as cost concepts, costing systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, cost and revenue prediction, pricing strategies, budgeting, capital budgeting, accounting, sources of financing, and variance analysis. The use of information technology is stressed in all of the above. Examples are provided from a variety of providers, including health maintenance organizations, hospitals, physician practices, home health agencies, nursing units, surgical centers, and integrated health care systems. Prerequisite(s): None. MHC 690 Quality Management in Health Care (5 units) T/O This course provides the student with an understanding of the components of a quality management program: quality assessment, risk management, utilization management, and outcomes assessment. Students learn to apply principles, processes, and tools used in Continuous Quality Improvement. The roles of teams, groups, and organizations and their impacts on policies and processes for quality and safety assurance of patients are also presented. Prerequisite(s): None. MHC 695 Health Information Systems (5 Units) T/O This course is a comprehensive introduction to concepts and applications of information management in health care. Students explore the latest legislation affecting health data as well as the use of data warehousing, web technologies, database management systems, manipulation of electronic health records, and regulatory compliance in health information practice. Prerequisite(s): None. NET 110 A+ Repairing and Maintaining PCs (8 Units) This course is designed to give the student a solid theory basis for PC repair. The course covers system types, system assembly, PC components, and diagnostic tools. Emphasis is placed on understanding the PC components, how they function, and troubleshooting skills. Additional topics include PC installation, configuration, upgrading, troubleshooting, diagnosing, safety, preventative maintenance, operating systems diagnostics, and operating system upgrades. Prerequisite(s): None. NET 206 Windows Clients I (4 Units) This course provides an introduction to the legacy (XP-based) Microsoft Windows Desktop/Client operating system with an overview of Windows networking. Topics of discussion and hands-on exercises include system installation, the file system, profiles, policies, security, protocols, networking, remote access, printing, and troubleshooting. Prerequisite(s): None NET 208 Windows Clients II (4 Units) This course provides an introduction to the Microsoft Windows Desktop/Client operating system with an overview of Windows networking. Topics of discussion and hands-on exercises include system installation, the file system, profiles, policies, security, protocols, networking, and remote access, printing, and troubleshooting. Prerequisite(s): None. NET 209 Windows Servers (8 Units) This course provides students with a broad understanding of Microsoft Windows servers including installation, configuration, management, and monitoring of server operating systems. Students will discuss and configure various file systems and disk management functions. General network administration will include peer-to-peer networking, an introduction to domain 132

management, active directory services, routing and remote access, printing, and application server functions. Prerequisite(s): NET 206 or NET 208. NET 210 (formerly NET 320) Wireless Technologies (4 Units) This course is a concept and theory class on today’s wireless technologies in use. Topics covered will be Wireless LANs, Satellite Communications, Cellular Technology, Bluetooth, Global Positioning Systems, as well as general wireless digital technologies. Prerequisite(s): None. *NET220 Switches and Routers (4 Units) Switching and routing provides an understanding of the OSI reference model and layered communications. Students will understand the different switching and bridging methods used in networks and learn the various LAN/WAN protocols. Configuring routers and switches using the internetworking operating system commands through the command line interface will also be addressed. Prerequisite(s): NET250. NET 225 Introduction to CISCO Routing (Formerly NET 425) (8 Units) This course presents fundamentals in networking and internetworking structure and theory, IP addressing, Binary Mathematics, LAN topologies and architecture, basic design, cables and cabling standards, and basic networking cabling. Students will learn through theory and a hands-on application. This is the first of four classes that lead students towards obtaining the Cisco CCNA certification. Prerequisite(s): None. *NET 230 Switches and Routers II (4 Units) Switches and Routers II provides a deeper understanding of the concepts setting up small to medium networks. Students will add to their understanding gained from the first course and expand their knowledge of the interaction of these network devices. They will learn to design and optimize networks to make them more efficient and secure. Students will gain much more hands-on experience configuring and troubleshooting the switches and routers. Prerequisite(s): NET220. NET 232 Routing and Switching Essentials (Formerly NET 430) (8 Units) This course presents fundamentals in router configuration and internetworking structure and theory, the OIS model, IP addressing, LAN and WAN topologies and architecture, Routed and Routing WAN topologies, router modes, router components, routing protocols, router setup, router configuration, Cisco IOS command and configuration and TCP/IP. Students will learn through theory and a hands-on application. This is the second of four classes that lead students towards obtaining the Cisco CCNA certification. Prerequisite(s): NET 225. NET 235 Virtualization (4 Units) Virtualization is a strategic technology which forms the basis for private and public cloud systems, and reduces overall IT cost. In this course students will study virtualization architecture, platforms, technologies, and develop knowledge and proficiency with virtualization, along with best practices. Prerequisite(s): NET209. NET 240 (formerly NET 340) Advanced TCP/IP (4 Units) This course is an in-depth examination of the TCP/IP stack with special emphasis on the Transport and Network layer protocols. Prerequisite(s): NET 250. NET 250 Networking Concepts (4 Units) 133

This course covers the basic concepts of Local Area Networks (LANs) and their technologies. This course will use a technical approach to LANs including an overview of Networking Protocols, Topographies, Media, and Networking Devices using the Open System Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model. This course shows how data flows from the Home, Small Office/Home Office (SOHO), and Enterprise networks. Prerequisite(s): None. NET 260 Linux Network Administration (4 Units) Linux Network Administration addresses the skills needed to set up and maintain a Linux operating system. Essential tasks of the Linux administrator will be discussed. From a taskoriented perspective, the course will explore the concepts, structure, and assumptions that define a Linux environment using the commands, procedures, and strategies necessary to succeed as a Linux administrator. Prerequisite(s): COM 259. *NET 290 Network Design and Implementation (8 Units) This course allows students to apply concepts of Network Theory, Elements of a Network, Design and Implementation, Network Administration, and Network Management. During this course, students will be undertaking various tasks, familiarizing themselves with logical and physical LAN & WAN topologies, and devices configured within the Network. Installing and utilizing various Operating System platforms and protocols that govern the components of a Network. Prerequisite(s): NET110, NET208, NET209, NET220, and NET260. ATNS

NET 360 Advanced UNIX Network Administration (4 Units) This course teaches the skills necessary to set up a UNIX network capable of supporting DNS and Web servers, an anonymous FTP site, and print server. Students will install the operating system, applications, and learn how to upgrade the kernel, as well as configure the servers to satisfy enterprise requirements. Students will also write shell scripts to automate typical administrative tasks and learn how to configure connectivity with Novell and NT servers. The UNIX operating system used in this course will be Linux. Prerequisite(s): COM259 and NET260.

ATNS

NET 370 Windows Shell Scripting (Formerly NET 270) (4 Units) This course focuses on the current scripting environment used by the Windows operating systems for automation. Subjects will include introduction of common commands, usage, remote execution, expansion with WMI concepts, inclusion of Active Directory modification, error handling, analysis, and creation of script examples. Prerequisite(s): NET 209.

ATNS

NET 400 Storage Technology Foundation (4 Units) This course provides a comprehensive introduction to Data Storage technology fundamentals. Participants will gain knowledge of the core logical and physical components that make up a Storage Systems Infrastructure. Prerequisite(s): None.

ATNS

NET 415 VMWare Infrastructure: Install and Configure (4 Units) This course covers the installation and configuration of VMware Infrastructure. Through lecture and hands-on lab assignments, the student will examine how server virtualization can transform a single, physical computer host into a vehicle that supports the execution of multiple virtual systems. The student will explore the installation, configuration, and management of VMware’s current Infrastructure software, which consists of VMware ESXi Server, VMware vCenter Server and VMware vCenter Server Appliance. Prerequisite(s): None. 134

ATNS

*NET 425 Introduction to CISCO Routing (8 Units) This course presents fundamentals in networking and internetworking structure and theory, IP addressing, Binary Mathematics, LAN topologies and architecture, basic design, cables and cabling standards, and basic networking cabling. Students will learn through theory and a handson application. This is the first of four classes that lead students towards obtaining the Cisco CCNA certification. Prerequisite(s): None.

ATNS

*NET 430 Routing and Switching Essentials (8 Units) This course presents fundamentals in router configuration and internetworking structure and theory, the OIS model, IP addressing, LAN and WAN topologies and architecture, Routed and Routing WAN topologies, router modes, router components, routing protocols, router setup, router configuration, Cisco IOS command and configuration and TCP/IP. Students will learn through theory and a hands-on application. This is the second of four classes that lead students towards obtaining the Cisco CCNA certification. Prerequisite(s): NET 225.

ATNS

NET 435 Scaling Networks (8 Units) This course presents fundamentals in LAN (Local Area Network) design, configuration and internetworking structure and theory, a review of OSI model layers and functions, LAN switching, VLANS (Virtual LANs), routing protocols, routing configuration, monitoring and troubleshooting. Students will learn through theory and hands on application to design, configure, install and implement a LAN. Prerequisite(s): NET 232.

ATNS

NET 440 Connecting Networks (8 Units) This course presents fundamentals in Wide Area Network Topologies, Interfaces, Protocols, Linking technology, Frame encapsulation, Design, internetworking structure and theory, ISDN and ISDN components, configuration, Frame Relay, and Subinterfaces. Students will learn through theory and hands-on application, the process of designing, configuring, installing and implementing a Wide Area Network. Prerequisite(s): NET 435.

# RES 698 Thesis I (5 Units) Thesis Course A is an independent self-study course. Throughout the student’s program, the milestones in the Weekly Thesis Assignments should be used to help the student prepare for the final program requirement of the final thesis paper. The student should demonstrate their mastery of the graduate studies content through the successful completion of a scholarly thesis paper, which should be properly formatted and cited according to APA Manual Version 6 guidelines; be a minimum of thirty pages in length; utilize at least fifty scholarly references; and must be directly related to the field of business. Prerequisite(s): None. # RES 699 Thesis II (5 Units) Thesis course B is an independent self-study course. This course is a continuation of the writing process for the completion of the Thesis requirements necessary for completion of a master's degree program. Prerequisite(s): RES698. SCI 100 General Biology (4 Units) GE This course will foster an understanding and appreciation of the fundamental principles of biology and health. The topics to be covered include: the chemistry of life, the classification of living things, cell structure and function, molecular genetics, cell division, properties of DNA, genetics and inheritance, evolution and diversity, and ecology. Although the human will be the chief organism of focus, this course emphasizes the common themes in biology so the basic 135

principles can be applied to unicellular, multicellular, plant, and animal species. Prerequisite(s): None. SEC 200 Introduction to Network Security (4 Units) An introduction to common network security issues to include authentication, attacks and malicious code, remote access, Web and email security, wireless networking, instant messaging, network devices, network security topologies, cryptography and disaster recovery. Prerequisite(s): None. SEC 210 (Formerly SEC 310) Ethics, Policies, and Procedures (4 Units) Students will learn the importance of developing an information security documentation program and how to develop and implement effective policies and procedures. The course focuses on technology writing, legal and ethical issues, fair use policies, information protection, policy development, standards, information classification, and security checklists. Prerequisite(s): SEC 200. ATNS

SEC 320 Intermediate Network Security (4 Units) Students will learn the fundamentals of network and infrastructure security. The course will focus on the internal corporate network and all the security that entails. Evaluation of network design, implementation, and configuration as it relates to security will be covered. Prerequisite(s): SEC 200 and SEC 210.

ATNS

SEC 330 Computer Forensics (4 Units) Computer forensics has been a professional field for many years. With the growth of the Internet and the worldwide proliferation of computers, there is an increased need for computer investigation. This course is designed to provide the student with a solid foundation by introducing computer forensics at the novice level. Prerequisite(s): SEC 210.

ATNS

SEC 340 Operating System Hardening (4 Units) Students will learn to audit, patch, and configure client/server operating systems on a Windows network. The course focuses on operating systems’ security from a stand-alone and network client/ server perspective. Emphasis will be placed on securing current versions of operating systems agents, current threats, and future attacks. Prerequisite(s): NET260 and SEC 200.

ATNS

SEC 345 Hardening Linux (4 Units) Students will learn to audit, patch, and configure client/server operating systems on a Linux network. The course focuses on operating system security from a stand-alone and network client/ server perspective. Emphasis will be placed on securing current version of operating systems agents, current threats, and future attacks. Prerequisite(s): NET 260 and SEC 200.

ATNS

SEC 350 Advanced Network Security (4 Units) Students will learn about advanced network security topics from an attacker perspective. The objective of the course is to get students to understand how malicious hacker attacks are done. A better understanding of the attacker allows students to learn how to better defend an organization from an attack. Prerequisite(s): SEC 210 and SEC320.

SEC 360 Advanced Network Security: Penetration Testing This course is designed to further provide students with the tools necessary to apply known attack techniques to an organization to locate security vulnerabilities, analyze the business risk 136

implications, write or develop modern exploits, and recommend mitigations before those vulnerabilities are exploited by real-world attackers. # SOC 110 Introductory Sociology (4 Units) GE This course will explore ways of “thinking sociologically.” Major ideas, concepts, and methods in the study of society including socialization, culture, social structure, social stratification, social control, and social change will be examined. The course will cover some of the major paradigms of sociological thinking and students will learn about the ways that sociologists do research, and disseminate information to the world. Prerequisite(s): None. # SOC 115 Psychology (4 Units) GE Psychology is the study of individual behavior. Modern psychology also studies how we perceive, learn, and interpret the various items of information we receive through our senses. This introductory course in psychology will acquaint students with an historical perspective, the wellknown schools of thought, human development, current popular issues, the basic elements of personality, and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite(s): None. # SOC 315 Abnormal Psychology (4 Units) GE This course explores the behavior of people with diagnosed psychological disorders. Case studies help students understand the biological, psychological, and environmental causes of dysfunctional behavior. The course explores current theory and practice in the treatment of the mentally ill, including the multiple approaches that characterize the field today. Prerequisite(s): None. SOC 325 Interpersonal Communication (4 Units) GE This course is an exploration of the personal communication process and the effect of personality, temperament, and behavior. It examines the theory and research that explores interpersonal communication, effective methods of problem solving in small group and team, and conflict management. Emphasis is placed on the self – awareness, self discloser, relational development. Practical application of the communication best practices and how to improve one’s communication skills. Prerequisite(s): ENG 110. SOC 330 U.S. Mosaic (4 Units) GE The course will examine the intersectionality of selected racial/ ethnic groups, social classes, genders, sexual orientations, and nationalities from a sociological perspective. This course focuses on acquiring an understanding of diversity and multiculturalism in modern U.S. society. Topics include such issues as identity, political economy, social change, and social movements. Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 and SOC 110.

137

PART 10: Faculty * Full-time faculty members are full-time Coleman University employees whose primary employment obligation is to teaching. Full time faculty members are expected to be on campus on a regular basis and attend faculty seminars and workshops, along with other Coleman University meetings and activities. # Focused faculty members are full- or part-time Coleman University employees whose primary employment obligation is not teaching, but they may be called upon to teach. Focused faculty members have substantial responsibilities in the areas of teaching methodology, curriculum development, assessment, and programmatic review. Focused faculty members are expected to be on campus on a regular basis and attend faculty seminars and workshops along with Coleman University meetings and activities. Adjunct faculty members are Coleman University teachers whose principal professional commitments are elsewhere in their fields, but who are contracted to teach a designated number of courses per year. #Abel, Jason T. MS Business and Technology Management, Coleman University, 2009. BS Computer Networks, Coleman University, 2004. BS in Computer Information Systems, Coleman University, 2007. AS in Information Systems, Coleman University, 2007. AS in Computer Network Technology, Coleman College, 2002. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Akerele, Flavius A. EdD in Educational Leadership, Argosy University, 2011. MBA in Business Administration, National University, 2008. MED in Cross-cultural Teaching, National University, 2004. BA in History, University of Maryland, College Park, 1991. Teaching specialization in General Education. Al Ajrawi, Shams. MS in Electrical and Computer Engineering, New York Institute of Technology, 2009. BS in Computer Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology, 2004. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. *Antis, Neil D. Master of Project Management, Keller Graduate School of Management, 2013. BS in Network and Comm. Management, DeVry University, 2012. Teaching specialization in Network Security. Azordegan, Shahram. EdD in School Administration, Mississippi State University, 1977. MBA in Management and Marketing, Mississippi College, 1974; BS in Business Statistics and Data Processing, Mississippi State University, 1973. Teaching specialization in General Education. *Bille, Paul. MS Computer Science, University of Colorado, 2001. MS Geophysics, Boston College, 1975. BS Management, Boston College 1969 . Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. #Bishop, Ethan. MA in English, San Diego State University, 2010. BA in English, San Diego State University, 2006. Teaching specialization in General Education. Boggs, Bill. MPH in Health Care, University of Tennessee, 1974. BS in Health Education, University of Tennessee, 1973. Teaching specialization in General Education. 138

Booth, Emily. M.Ed Software Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, 2014. BS Information Science, Penn State University, 2014.Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Bradley, Curtis. MS in Software Engineering, National University, 1987. BS in Computer Science, National University, 1986. Teaching specialization Computer Information Science. Bradley, Lars. DBA in Business Administration, Walden University, All but dissertation (ABD). MBA, Walden University, 2008. BS in Process and Piping Design, University of Houston Downtown, 1994. Teaching specialization in Graduate Studies. Broding, Mary C. MA English, Northern Arizona University, 2011. MA Art History, San Diego State University, 2005. BA Art History, University of San Diego, 2002. Teaching specialization in General Education. Bruce, Arron. MBA in International Business Administration, Alliant International University, 1997. BA in Social Science, Michigan State University, 1994. Teaching specialization in Graduate Studies. Burgarin, Temotio E. DBA in International Business Marketing, Alliant International University, 2001. MA in International Relations, Salve Regina University, 1984. Master of Business in Public Administration, Southeastern University, 1980. MS in Operations Research, Naval Postgraduate School, 1973. Teaching specialization in General Education. *Burch, Jeanne Annette. BS Computer Graphic Design, Coleman College, 2006. AS Computer Graphic Design, Coleman College, 2005. BAS in Biology and English, University of California, Davis, 1993. Teaching specialization in Graphic Design. *Byrne, Thomas J. Computer Networks Certificate, Coleman University, 2010. BA in Management Science, University of California San Diego, 1988. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. Campbell, Shannon N. MS in Biology, University of California San Diego, 2013. BS in Biology, University of California San Diego, 2012. Teaching specialization in General Education. Camplisson, Dominic M. MTS Theology, University of Dallas, 1997. BA Modern History, Queens University, Ireland, 1982. Teaching specialization in General Education. Camplisson, Kimberly A. MTS Theology, University of Dallas, 1997. BA English, Loyola Marymount University, 1983. California Teaching Credential, CLAD Certificate, California Single Subject English Credential. Teaching specialization in General Education. Christopher, Thomas. MS Psychology and Business Administration, San Diego State University, 1987. BS Computer Information Science, Coleman College, 1997. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Church, Devin. BS in Game Programming Development and Design, Coleman University, 2013. AS in Game Programming Development and Design, Coleman University, 2012. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Cornish, Randall. BA in Communications, University of California San Diego, 1980. BA in Visual Arts, University of California San Diego, 1980. Teaching specialization in Graphic Design. Dasilva, Ray. MBA, University of Phoenix, 2008. MS in Engineering Management, University of California Northridge, 2005. BS in Computer Science, California State University Northridge, 2002. Teaching specialization in 139

Desmond, Thomas. BS in Engineering Business Informatics, University of California Riverside, 2014. Teaching specialization in Information Science. Dominguez, Nathaniel J. MS in Information Systems Management, Coleman University, 2010. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. Teaching specialization in Figueroa, Rodney A. BS in Game Art & Design, Art Institute of California, 2008. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Flanagan, Jack. MS in Business Administration and Management, Boston University, 1995. Teaching specialization in College of Graduate Studies. Garcia, Darlene. BS Multimedia Communications, Alliant International University San Diego, CA, 1998. Gordon, Albert P. MS Wireless Communication, National University, 2013. BA Psychology, University of Rochester, 1976. BS Electrical Engineering, Northrop University, 1974. Teaching specialization in General Education. Green, Scott W. BA International Relations, University of Southern California, 1978. AA Biology, Southwestern College, 1975. A+, N+, Server+ INET+, Novell Administrator 5.0/5. MCP, MCP+, MCSE-NT 4.0, MCSE- 2000, MCSA- 2000, Cisco Network Administrator, EMC, MCTS- Vista, VCP-4 VMware, Security+. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. Holladay, Richard. PhD in Music Theory and Analysis with Computer Applications, Ohio State University, 1977. MA in Music Theory and Analysis with Computer Applications, Ohio State University, 1973. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. James, Kelley. JD in Child, Family, and Elder Law, California Western School of Law, 2005. MSW in Social Work, San Diego State University, 2005. BA in Law and Society, University of California, 2001. AA in Criminal Justice, Cuesta College, 1998. Teaching specialization in General Education. Jones, LaDon. PhD in Health Services, University of Alabama Birmingham, 1995. MS in Health Administration, University of Alabama Birmingham, 1990. Teaching specialization in Graduate Studies. Klunk, Michael A. BS Computer Information Systems, Coleman College, 1998. AS Computer Information Systems, Coleman College, 1998. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. *Le, Anthony Q. BA Cognitive Science, University of California, San Diego, 1991. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Lindeneau, Scott. BA in Computer Science, University of California Berkeley, 2006. Teaching specialization in Lobera, Jaime. MS in Technology Management, National University, 2005. BS in Psychology, University of Maryland, 1999. AA in Management Studies, University of Maryland, 1998. Teaching specialization in Graduate Studies. *Luallin, Brent E. MS Information Systems, Coleman College, 2000. BS Computer Electronics Technology, Coleman College, 1997. A+, Network +, MCP Windows 2000, MCSA 2000, MCTS Vista Certified. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. Lynch, Michael. MBA, University of Phoenix, 2015. BS in Networking, Coleman University, 2010. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. 140

Maloney, James. BA in Math, San Diego State University, 2000. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Mamuya, Ngao. PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, 2010. MS in Electrical Engineering, University of Oklahoma, 1999. MS in Mathematics, University of Oklahoma, 1996. BS in Mathematics, Southwestern Adventist University, 1993. Teaching specialization in Graduate Studies. Martin, Stephen F. MS Software Engineering, National University, 1997. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Martin, William. BS in Game Art and Design, Art Institute of California, 2013. Teaching specialization in Information Science. Martinez, Andre R. BS in Network Security, Coleman University, 2012. BS in Computer Networks, Coleman University, 2012. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. Mayer, Scott J. MS Software Engineering, National University, 1990. BS Management Information Systems, Southern New Hampshire University, 1986. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Miller, Quentin. MBA, University of Phoenix, 2010. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. *Mitchell, Tommy E. MS Information Systems Management, Coleman University, 2010. BS Digital Entertainment and Game Design, ITT Technical Institute, 2009. AS Information Technology Multimedia, ITT Technical Institute 2006. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Moberly, Raymond B. PhD in Computational Science, San Diego State University, 2012. MS in Applied Mathematics, San Diego State University, 2000. BS in Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1988. Teaching specialization in Graduate Studies. Mooney, Douglas. BA in Art, San Diego State University, 1982. Teaching specialization in Graphic Design. *Morgan, Charlie. BS Computer Information Science, Coleman University, 2010. AS Computer Information Science, Coleman University, 2009. BA Biology and General Science, San Diego State University 1965. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Morris, James. BS in Computer Science, National University, 1990. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. Nance, Scott M. BA Cognitive Science, University of California, San Diego, 2005. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Oson, Christopher M. BS Computer Science, San Diego State University, 2001. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Peisl, Martin. PhD Electrical Engineering, Technical University of Munich, 1984. MS Electrical Engineering, Technical University of Munich, 1982. BS Electrical Engineering, Technical University of Munich, 1980.Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. #Peloquin, Danielle L. MS Library & Information Science, Simmons College, 2010. BA English, Hartwick College, 2008. BA History, Hartwick College 2008. Teaching specialization in General Education.

141

Priggemeier, Samuel J. MA in Military History, Norwich University, 2010. BS in Mathematical Science, Southern Utah University, 2002. Teaching specialization in General Education. *Rabor, Leticia Ann. MS Technology, The University of Advancing Technology, Tempe Arizona, 2010. BS Computer Science, California State University, San Bernardino, 1999. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Ramos, John J. MBA, Coleman University, 2010 . Computer Information Science Certificate, Coleman University, 2001. BS in Oceanography, U.S. Naval Academy, 1986. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Razalan, Patric. MS in Electronic Commerce, National University, 2001. AS in Computer Electronic Technology, 1995. BS in English, Marquette University, 1975. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. #Reid, William S. MS Information Technology Management, Regis University, 2007. MS Computer Science, Naval Postgraduate School, 1994. BA Business Administration, Saint Leo College 1981. LINUX+, MCP WIN 2000, CCNA Cisco, MCSE NT 4.0, CNA, CISM. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks and Graduate Studies. Rodley, Jonathan, BA in Literature and Writing, California State University San Marcos, 2005. Teaching specialization in General Education. Rosales, Aldo. BS in Networking and Telecommunication, University of Pheonix, 2014. AS in Electronic Engineering Technology, ITT Technical Institute, 1990. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. Roshdy, Rasha. EdD in Educational Leadership, San Diego State University, 2014. MA in Modern Languages Kansas State University, 2007. Teaching specialization in Graduate Studies. Roxas, Marvin. MA in Counseling Psychology, National University, 2013. Teaching specialization in General Education. Sahlin, John P. PhD in Systems Engineering, George Washington University, 2013. MS in Systems Engineering, George Washington University, 2009. MA in Government and Politics, University of Maryland College Park, 1994. BS in Political Science, U.S. Naval Academy, 1993. Teaching specialization in Graduate Studies. Scholte, John M. Master of Divinity, Religion Western Theological Seminary, 1988. BA in Religion, Hope College, 1984. AA in Liberal Arts, Kalamazoo Valley Community College, 1982. Teaching specialization in General Education. Scott, Robert A. MS in Information Technology, Coleman University, 2001. BS in Computer Applications & Networks, Coleman University, 1999. AS in Computer Applications & Networks, Coleman University, 1999. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. Senecal, Seth. MA in Psychology, Alliant International University, 2010. BA in Psychology, University of California-San Diego, 2006. Teaching specialization in General Education. Stephen, Danielle R. MA in Education/Curriculum and Instruction, University of Phoenix, 2012. BA in English, San Diego State University, 2006. Teaching specialization in General Education. Tinnakornsrisuphhap, Thidarat. PhD in Industrial Engineering, Oregon State University, 2006. MS in Industrial Engineering, Oregon State University, 2002; BE in Industrial Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, 1998. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. 142

Vargas, Michael A. EdD in Interdisciplinary Leadership, Creighton University, All but dissertation(ABD). Master of Project Management in Management, Keller Graduate School of Management, 2011. Teaching specialization in Graduate Studies. *Vasquez, Travis R. MS Information Systems Management, Coleman University, 2010. BS Digital Entertainment & Game Design, ITT Technical Institute, 2009. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Wells, Richard A. BS in Computer Graphic Design, Coleman University, 2006. AS in Computer Graphic Design, Coleman University, 2005. Teaching specialization in Graphic Design. Wiebusch, Aledander. MNCM in Network and Communication Management, Keller Graduate School, 2012. BA in Radio and TV Production, 2011. AS in Computer Networks, Rio Salado, 2005. AA in General Education, Brevard Community College, 2005. Teaching specialization in Computer Networks. Williams, Kim. MS in Computer Information Systems, Boston University, 2007. BS in Computer Science, San Diego State University, 1992. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science. Willingham, Ryan. MFA Creative Writing, San Diego State University, 2010. BA English & Film Studies, UC Davis, Davis CA, 2007. Teaching specialization in General Education. Wyatt, John M. MBA in Technology Management, University of Phoenix, 2004. BS in Business/Information Systems, University of Phoenix, 2002. BS in Software Engineering, Colorado Technical University, 2007. Teaching specialization in Computer Information Science.

143

PART 11: Staff Officers

Norbert Kubilus Bruce Gilden Secretary Ronald Klingensmith Dr. Kimberly Lobera Bobbie Strohm

Interim President/CEO Vice President/ Institutional Effectiveness & ALO, Chief Financial Officer Vice President/Academics Vice President/Marketing and Admissions

Academics Dr. Kimberly Lobera Jaime Lobera Ethan Bishop Amanda Hernandez Danielle Peloquin Scott Norton John Ramos William Reid

Vice President/Academics Dean of College of Graduate Studies Dean of General Education Interdepartmental Research Assistant Associate Dean of General Education Dean of College of Graphic Design Dean of College of Computer Information Science Dean of College of Computer Networks

Accounting/Business Office Ronald Klingensmith Kieu Le Laura Sales

Chief Financial Officer Accounts Receivable Manager Senior Accountant

Admissions Bobbie Strohm Bobby Palma Michelle Cesena Janet Costa Natalia Garin Christan Maxwell Tricia Roberson

Vice President/Marketing and Admissions Admissions Officer Admissions Officer Admissions Officer Admissions Officer Director of Military and Community Outreach Admission Officer

Career Services Bob Sweigart David Camarena Julia Katawazi Brent Miller

Director of Career Services Career Services Advisor (Domestic) Career Services Advisor (International) Career Services Advisor (Domestic)

Communications Brandi Landrum

Director of Communications & Test Center

Computer Services Jason Abel Brian Morgan Eric Linder Marcus Winch Robert Stretch

Chief Technology Officer Network Administrator Assistant Network Administrator Assistant Network Administrator Learning Management System Administrator 144

Trina Robeniol

Associate Learning Management System Administrator

Development Rodney P. Weiss

Director of Development

Facilities Terry Glynn Ignacio Caballero Frank Dixon Maria Gonzalez John Skoby

Director of Facilities Facilities Associate Facilities Associate Facilities Associate Facilities Associate

Financial Aid Axel Hernandez Melissa Marini Bridget Riggert Elaine Richards Ana Corral

Director of Financial Aid Financial Aid Administrator Financial Aid Administrator Financial Aid Administrator Financial Aid Administrator

Front Desk Lisa Contreras Belinda Beech

Director of First Impressions First Impressions Associate

Human Resources Maria Hamzavi TJ Glenn

Director of Human Resources Interdepartmental Administrative Assistant

Institutional Effectiveness Bruce F. Gilden Dr. Ngao Mamuya

VP, Institutional Effectiveness Senior Institutional Research Analyst

Library

Manual Bernad

Librarian

Marketing Bobbie Strohm Chris Carey Midori Bond

Vice President/Marketing and Admissions Director of Digital Marketing and Web Development Graphic Designer

Registrar Alex Wissman Brielle Sellers

University Registrar Assistant Registrar

Resource Center Amzi Franco Mariko Army

Resource Center Manager Resource Center Administrator

Student Services Jason Kranz Ariana Marrón Jonathon Ramirez

Director of Student Services Academic Advisor Academic Advisor 145

Kevin Wool Sara Pirayesh Test Center Brandi Landrum Laura Soto Brielle Sellers Marisa Morales

Academic Advisor Academic Advisor Director of Communications and Test Center Test Center Supervisor Test Center Coordinator Test Center Coordinator

146

Index Domestic Applicants (UNDG), 36 Drugs, Narcotics, and Alcohol, 86

A

E

Academic Advising, 99 Academic Calendar, 96 Academic Code of Conduct & Ethics, 90 Academic Dishonesty, 90 Academic Freedom, 11 Academic Life, 12 Academic Policies, 90 Academic Status, 98 Acceptable Use Policy, Computing Resources, 85 Accessibility Services, 47 Accreditation Information, 8 Address Change, 104 Administrative Policies, 82 Admissions, 33 Graduate Requirements, 42 Affiliations, 8 Alumni (CAPS), 49 Attendance, 96 Auditing, 99

Email and Internet Access, 50 Exceptions to Academic Regulations, 110 Expenses, 67

F

Faculty, 135 FERPA, 82 Financial Aid, 50, 74 Application Process for Federal Programs, 75 Cost of Attendance, 76 Course Load Guidelines, 77 Dependency Status, 74 Disbursem*nt), 77 Eligibility, 74 Financial Need, 76 Loan Repayment, 77 Other Sources, 81 Programs, 75 Refunds/Return of Title IV Funds, 77 Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), 76 Financial Statements, 69 Firearms, 86 Food and Drink, 86

B

Board of Trustees, 12

C

Cancellation, 70, 87 Career Services, 47 Certification Testing Center, 48 Change of Degree Program, 104 Changes in Degree Requirements, 104 Class Levels, 98 Classroom Expectations/Conduct, 98 Co-Curricular Organizations, 48 Collections, 72 College Level Examination Program (CLEP), 109 College of Computer Information Science (CIS), 17 College of Computer Networks (CCN), 23 College of General Education (CGE), 28 College of Graduate Studies (CGS), 29 Consumer Information, 82 Contact Information, 14 Course Cancellation, 93 Course Descriptions, 111 Course Numbering System, 111 Curriculum Development, 50

G

Game Programming Development and Design Programs, 19 Governance and Management, 12 Grade Appeals, 102 Grade Levels (UNDG), 104 Grades, 100 Graduate Admissions, 40 Graduation, 105 Graphic Design, 26 Grievance Procedure, Student, 83

H

History, 9 Honors, 103 Hours of Operation, 14 Housing, 54

D

Deregistration (Failure to pay), 72 Dismissal, 88 Distance Education, 50 Diversity, Statement on, 11, 82 Domestic Applicants (GRAD), 42

147

I

Identification Badges, 89 Information Technology, 50 International Applicants (GRAD), 43 International Applicants (UNDG), 37 International Student Support, 51

L

Scholarships, 80 Sexual Harassment, 83 Smoking, 86 Software Development, 17 Staff, 140 Student Problem Solving/Dispute Resolution Guidelines, 88 Student Resources and Services, 47 Student Services, 54 Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF), 72 Suspension, 88

Leave of Absence, 106 Legal Control, 12 Library and Resource Center, 53

M

Master of Business Administration, 30 Master of Business Administration with a specialization in Health Care Management, 31 Master of Science in Information Systems Management, 29 Mission Statement, 7, 10

T

Technology Requirements and Responsibilities, 98 Telephone Calls, 86 Term Dates, 15 Term Organization/Unit of Credit, 96 Transcripts, 103 Transfer Credits/Credit for Previous Coursework, 107 Tuition and Fees, 67 Tuition Deferments, 69 Tuition Payment Plan, 72 Tuition Payment Policy, 69

N

Name Change, 104 Network Security, 23 Non-Academic Student Code of Conduct & Ethics, 84 Non-discrimination, Statement of, 12 Non-Discrimination, Statement of, 83

O

U

Objectives, University, 10 Orientation, 54

Undergraduate Admissions, 33 University Catalog, 92

P

V

Payment Due Date, 69 Payment Methods, 69 Personal Appearance, 86 Program Length, 105

Veteran Affairs, 55 Benefit Programs, 55 Called to Serve - Re-Admission Policy, 64 Debts and Over-Payments, 65 Deployments, 64 Military Applicants, 55 Military Transcripts, 55 Student Overpayments, 65 Student Responsibilities, 62 Veteran Student Support, 54 Visitors, 89

R

Refund Distribution, 71 Refund Policy, 70 Registration, 92, 99 Reinstatement, 88 Repeated Courses, 99 Residency Requirements, 99

W

S

Waiving Classes/Challenge by Examination, 110 Withdrawal, 70, 87, 93, 106

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy, 94

148

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